4,493 results for Report

  • Shoreline changes for southeastern Matakana Island (Panepane Point) following capital dredging (2015-16)

    de Lange, Willem P.; Moon, Vicki G. (2017)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Surveys of the mean high water mark before and after the capital dredging of 2015/16 indicate minor shoreline fluctuations on the open coast of Matakana Island that are consistent with normal variations. The largest change has occurred at the Panepane Point spit tip, which eroded by ˜20 m between August 2015 and October 2016. This is most likely due to the changed alignment of the channels approaching the narrowest section of the tidal inlet, and is consistent with the predicted impacts in the Assessment of Environmental Impacts. Panepane Point is not expected to continue to erode further with the current channel alignment. The patterns of erosion and accretion observed for the ebb tidal delta (Matakana Banks) since the dredging are consistent with those reported before dredging, and are associated with the migration of swash bars over the swash platform of the delta in response to normal variations in wave and tidal currents. These is some evidence to suggest that the ebb tidal delta is starting to extend further offshore. The observed changes do not indicate that the ebb tidal delta is undergoing collapse following dredging. The patterns of erosion and accretion observed in the Lower Western Channel are consistent with channel migrations observed in the past, superimposed on continuing shoaling of the ebb shield of the flood tidal delta (Centre Bank). The contribution of dredging to this behaviour is currently being investigated.

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  • Invasive fish survey of Lake Arapuni by boat electrofishing

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Powrie, Warrick; Kim, Brian (2017)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A boat electrofishing survey of Lake Arapuni was conducted on 2 February 2017 by the University of Waikato to investigate anecdotal reports of koi carp (Cyprinus carpio) presence in the lake. Nine 10-minute electrofishing transects were conducted around the littoral zone of the lake. This resulted in a total distance fished of 3.35 km and a total area fished of 1.34 ha. A total of 100 fish were captured, comprising three species: brown bullhead catfish (Ameiurus nebu/osus), goldfish {Carassius auratus) and rudd {Scardinius erythrophthalmus); in addition, eels (Anguilla sp.) were observed but not captured. Total captured fish biomass was 14.8 kg {11. 7 kg/ha) with goldfish being the most abundant species (86 individuals), accounting for most of the biomass (86.8%). Rudd were the next most abundant species with nine individuals captured (1.0 kg/ha) followed by catfish (five individuals; 0.4 kg/ha). Rudd and catfish boat electrofishing biomass estimates should be regarded as minimal as capture rates for benthic species (catfish) and juveniles (rudd) are often lower than those of adult pelagic species. The reduced capture efficiency of benthic species is due to their preference for depths beyond the extent of the electrofishing field (approximately 2 m in extent from the anode), in addition benthic species are more likely to be missed by netters due to their reduced visibility. The smaller size (150 mm FL), many of which were highly coloured and had markings similar to those of koi carp. It is likely that these larger coloured goldfish were mistaken for koi carp in previous sightings, especially as adult goldfish form small aggregations similar to those of koi carp. If koi carp are present in Lake Arapuni they are likely to be at biomass levels too low to mount viable control or eradication programmes given the large area and depth of the lake.

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  • Energy Cultures policy briefs

    Stephenson, J.; Barton, Barry; Carrington, G.; Hopkins, D.; Lavelle, M.J.; Lawson, R.; Rees, D.; Scott, M.; Thorsnes, P.; Walton, S.; Wooliscroft, B. (2016)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Launched in 2012, the Energy Cultures Project is led by the Centre for Sustainability at the University of Otago and aims to develop knowledge and tools to achieve a sustainable energy transition across New Zealand. The Energy Cultures 2 Project focuses on efficiency transitions in three domains: households, businesses and transport systems.These policy briefs are an output of the Energy Cultures 2 research programme, funded 2012-2016 by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. The purpose of these briefs is to assist with the design of improved policies and practices to promote more efficient energy use in households, businesses and transport in New Zealand.

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  • Child poverty and mental health: A literature review (Commissioned for New Zealand Psychological Society and Child Poverty Action Group)

    Gibson, Kerry; Abraham, Quentin; Asher, Innes; Black, Rose; Turner, Nikki; Waitoki, Waikaremoana; McMillan, Natasha (2017)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Large numbers of children in New Zealand suffer from mental health problems, and large numbers of children suffer from poverty and hardship. This literature review provides information on the relationship between poverty experienced during childhood and the impact that poverty may have on the mental health of a child or young person, or later in their adulthood. It was found that: • There is an accepted relationship between poverty experienced in childhood and a greater likelihood of mental health problems through the life span. • Child poverty and its associated problems such as poor nutrition, inadequate housing, increased likelihood of adverse events and living in poor neighbourhoods put children at higher risk of having mental health problems. • The evidence strongly suggests that the incidence of mental health conditions among children and adolescents can be reduced by addressing severe and persistent poverty, particularly during the early years of a child’s life. • Intervention to address poverty and the effects of poverty on children is likely to prevent the perpetuation of inter-generational cycles of poverty and poor mental health. • The prevalence of child poverty and mental health issues is likely to be higher for Māori and Pasifika than for other children and young people. • While many Māori and Pasifika children are subject to inequities in material and socio-economic circumstances as well as institutional racism, they also experience the benefits of a rich cultural life and sense of belonging that is seldom accounted for in research reports that focus on deprivation. The evidence strongly suggests that the incidence of mental health problems throughout the lifespan could be reduced through addressing the causes of child poverty and associated factors. Any mental health strategy for children should sit alongside a comprehensive programme to alleviate poverty. Strategies aimed at addressing child poverty in Māori and Pasifika communities are more likely to be effective if these are well-resourced at an early stage and developed in a genuine partnership with local communities.

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  • Using vignettes in interviews: Exploring discourses around child sexuality

    Flanagan, Paul (2017)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    In this case study, I describe the process of data gathering using vignettes in both interview and focus group contexts. Vignettes offer multiple possibilities when researching sensitive topics in which participants may experience vulnerability. This research examines understandings of sexuality in childhood. As a child and family counselor working closely with principals and teachers in primary schools, I supported schools and families responding to children’s “sexual" activity. Parents and teachers questioned the causes and effects of these children’s actions. Many adults responded from fear, naivety, confusion, and assumptions about children’s actions. These adult reactions led toward over-reactive and punitive consequences for children. Informed by adults’ discomfort and subsequent inscriptions of children’s actions as sexual, I developed six vignettes to elicit participant knowledge. I worked alongside ...

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  • Greater Wellington-Socio-Demographic profile 1986-2031.

    Jackson, Natalie (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A socio-demographic profile prepared for Greater Wellington regional council predicts.

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  • Rural women's voices: perceptions and experiences of rural risks

    Campbell, Maxine M.; Barnes, Jo (2017)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This project was initiated in response to anecdotal evidence suggesting a tendency for rural women to be more proactive than men in matters of safety on the farm. If so, it is imperative that we learn more about the experiences, perceptions and aspirations of rural women in order to support and empower them in their efforts to reduce risks and enhance safety. This survey is an initial step in achieving that and it is hoped that it will be part of a larger, more comprehensive accounting of the perspectives and experiences of rural women. Utilising an online survey tool, rural women were surveyed to establish their primary concerns in regard to farm safety, canvassing their opinions and experiences of the most common or intractable problems and who was considered to be at the highest risk. It also sought indications of prevailing practices and attitudes to safety. The survey was distributed through the Rural Women New Zealand’s newsletter, along with allied women’s groups on social media. In total, one hundred and sixty women responded to the survey. While we may note whether the data are consistent (or not) with common perceptions, we can make no claims beyond that. We present the results here as a record of the experiences, reflections and voices of the women who responded. The survey data indicated that a full age range (18-75+) participated in the survey, though most respondents fell into the middle age ranges (25-55). All but twelve percent of respondents had at least one other adult in residence, indicating that most respondents had a partner or other significant adult for support. In total, 121 children were spread amongst thirty-eight percent of the participants. The largest group (23%) contained school-aged children (5-14 years), followed by pre-school children (19%), and young adults (15-17 years: 9%). Respondents came from throughout the country, with Waikato in the north (38%) and Canterbury in the south (40%) having the highest levels of participation. Similarly, there was a broad mix of land contours reported, with half (49%) describing it as rolling and thirty-one percent describing it as hilly. The three most common types of farm were dairy (45%), cattle (36%) and sheep (35%). Risks were initially divided into broad categories, some of which were almost universal: vehicles (95%); machinery (90%); chemicals (85%); animals (86%). Water hazards were reported by seventy-four percent of the women and workshop hazards by sixty percent. The most commonly reported risks within the vehicle category were associated with tractors (90%), light vehicles (89%) and quad bikes (85%). For animals, dogs (75%) and pests (74%) were the most common, though cattle, sheep and dairy cows each featured in more than half of the responses. Vehicles caused the women the most concern (46%). Chemicals and infectious diseases were seldom cited, while water (10%), animals (12%) and machinery (16%) were of concern to a moderate number of women. The most commonly cited vehicle was the quad bike, though tractors were also mentioned frequently. The level of risk of serious injury or death in relation to the broad categories was considered to be either medium (43%) or low (32%) by the women. Adult males were overwhelmingly considered to be the group most at risk of injury on the farm and males were considered to be more at risk in every age group except pre-school. Almost half the women (46%) thought that adult females were also at risk.Water was regarded as a risk for young children (36% for female preschoolers), but did not feature at all for young adults. School-aged males were thought to be most at risk from quad bikes (21%), slightly ahead of their female counterparts (19%). The most frequently occurring broad category of risk was vehicles, cited by 44% of the women; the second largest category was animals. Of those who thought animals presented the most frequent risk, cows were the subcategory mentioned most often. Adult males were again considered to be most at risk (83%), followed by adult females (49%). Vehicles were considered one of the most difficult hazards to overcome, at thirty-two percent. Slightly more women (34%) however, regarded animals as the hardest risk to overcome. Forty-six women had dealt with injury on the farm in the previous five years. Twenty-two reported injuries from animals, which is contrary to their views on the most frequent risk (vehicles) but consistent with their assessment of the most intractable risk (animals). Next most common were vehicles (9) and machinery (7). Most incidents required a visit to the local doctor (53%), and twenty-eight percent required hospital care. Eight people required specialist care and long term rehabilitation and one person needed ongoing full time care. Injury prevention measures in place included physical barriers such as roll bars (34%) and seat belts (57%). Contrary to the women’s perceptions, the injury data indicated that adult females (rather than males) comprised the single biggest group by main category (animals, rather than vehicles), though males were injured more frequently overall. Vehicles were regarded as high risk and hard to mitigate, but played a lesser role than expected. Animals were regarded as lower risk, but harder to mitigate due to their unpredictability. Forty-three percent of the women thought that attitudes to risk were shared on some risks but not others. Adult males (45%) and teen-aged males (39%) were overwhelmingly considered to be the greatest risk takers when the highest propensity to take risk (rank 1) was considered. The largest group recording the lowest propensity to take risks (rank 8) was adult females (18%). By comparison, just four percent thought that adult males ranked at that level. The data here suggest there may be some truth underlying the anecdotal evidence that women are more proactive in matters of safety. Some of the women expressed frustration at other adults’ lack of compliance with safety measures. Twenty-six women indicated that their children were present in areas of the farm where work was taking place and twenty of the twenty-eight women for whom it was relevant indicated that they did not have daytime childcare available at all. The paucity of childcare options makes it inevitable that some children will be present in working areas of the farm at least some of the time. We consider the provision of childcare options to be one of the elements that is more amenable to solutions (as it has been for urban women), subject to political will. A small number of women were opposed to the survey’s focus on risks and safety, advocating common sense and personal responsibility. We contend that individual responsibility and harm minimisation are not mutually exclusive. If there are practical ways of minimising risks or changing cavalier attitudes, it is illogical to ignore them. We acknowledge the frustration expressed by the women, but note that the point of balance between safety and operational efficiency has shifted over the years and will continue to do so. Rural women’s voices need to be part of the conversations that determine that point.

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  • Failure analysis of some Toyota Prius battery packs and potential for recovery

    Leijen, Peter; Scott, Jonathan B. (2011)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The Toyota Prius battery pack consists of 38 individual battery blades, each blade contains 6 NiMH cells in series. This means that each pack contains 228 NiMH cells. Each cell has the potential to fail. This report investigates the mode of failure of Prius battery packs by first analysing a number of packs in the lab, and then road testing them in a Toyota Prius. The analysis of the battery packs shows that some packs had aged “linearly”, that is in a balanced manner, such that the state of health of all blades remained similar. However, in other packs discrete blades had significantly different states of health. A pack that consists of cells that are matched in both state of health and state of charge delivers the best performance. The research also showed that the worst cell in the pack determines the overall pack performance. This was demonstrated by substituting reducedcapacity or short-circuited blades into a functioning battery pack. A vehicle with a pack consisting of 37 2400 mAh battery blades and one 1200 mAh battery blade was only able to drive 1.3 km in Electric Vehicle mode, as opposed to 2.6 km with a pack consisting of 38 2400 mAh battery blades.

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  • Strengthening responsive and reciprocal relationships in a whānau tangata centre: An action research project

    Clarkin-Phillips, Jeanette; Carr, Margaret (2009)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This project came about after discussions with the general manager of the Wellington Region Free Kindergarten Association and Jeanette Clarkin-Phillips (University of Waikato) about setting up a research partnership to support the teachers at Taitoko Kindergarten in Levin. The teachers were establishing an integrated community centre (the whānau tangata centre) as part of a parent support and development initiative funded by the Ministry of Education in conjunction with the Ministry of Social Development. This initiative in Levin includes a drop-in centre for parents, parent workshops on topics of the parents’ choice, a well-resourced whānau room, facilities for infants and toddlers, school liaison visits and liaison with local health centres. The initiative at Taitoko Kindergarten is one of six pilot parent support and development projects. These pilot projects do not include any research components to evaluate the processes and outcomes for teaching and learning, or the level of engagement of the community. This Teaching and Learning Research Initiative (TLRI) project, in one centre, researched these aspects of the initiative in an ongoing action research project. The parent support and development contracts are a relatively new initiative for New Zealand, and this research project was designed to provide information to guide this teaching and learning policy for future initiatives of this nature. The aim of the TLRI research project was to investigate the development of the whānau tangata centre at Taitoko Kindergarten with teaching and learning in mind.

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  • Choosing the right microcontroller: A comparison of 8-bit Atmel, Microchip and Freescale MCUs

    Slade, Mel; Jones, Mark Hedley; Scott, Jonathan B. (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    When choosing a microcontroller there are many options, so which platform should you choose? There is little independent information available to help engineers decide which platform might best suit their needs and most designers tend to stick with the brand with which they are familiar. This is a difficult question to answer without bias if the people conducting the evaluations have had previous experience with MCU programming predominantly on one platform. This article draws on a case study. We built three “Smart” Sprinkler Taps, small, self-contained irrigation controllers, differing only in the microcontroller unit (MCU) on the inside. We compare cost, development software quality and hardware performance from the perspective of a new user to each of the platforms.

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  • Maori & Psychology Research Unit annual report 2008

    Rua, Mohi; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2009-03)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Annual report of the Maori and Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) 2008. The unit was established in August of 1997. The unit is designed to provide a catalyst and support network for enhancing research concerning the psychological needs, aspirations, and priorities of Maori people. The MPRU is well situated to draw together skilled and experienced interdisciplinary research groups by networking and establishing working relationships with staff and students within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University, and the wider community.

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  • Maori & Psychology Research Unit annual report 2006

    Rua, Mohi; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2006)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Annual report of the Maori and Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) 2006. The unit was established in August of 1997. The unit is designed to provide a catalyst and support network for enhancing research concerning the psychological needs, aspirations, and priorities of Maori people. The MPRU is well situated to draw together skilled and experienced interdisciplinary research groups by networking and establishing working relationships with staff and students within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University, and the wider community.

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  • Maori & Psychology Research Unit annual report 2004

    Rua, Mohi; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2004)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Annual report of the Maori and Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) 2004. The unit was established in August of 1997. The unit is designed to provide a catalyst and support network for enhancing research concerning the psychological needs, aspirations, and priorities of Maori people. The MPRU is well situated to draw together skilled and experienced interdisciplinary research groups by networking and establishing working relationships with staff and students within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University, and the wider community.

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  • Maori & Psychology Research Unit annual report 2005

    Rua, Mohi; Nikora, Linda Waimarie (2005)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Annual report of the Maori and Psychology Research Unit (MPRU) 2005. The unit was established in August of 1997. The unit is designed to provide a catalyst and support network for enhancing research concerning the psychological needs, aspirations, and priorities of Maori people. The MPRU is well situated to draw together skilled and experienced interdisciplinary research groups by networking and establishing working relationships with staff and students within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the University, and the wider community.

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  • PUCM 2 Survey Results 2001-2002

    Day, Maxine; Backhurst, Michael (2002-06)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This Report contains the results from a survey of resource management consultants and resource consent applicants carried out during 2001-2002 to gain factual and attitudinal information about the plan implementation processes of respective councils. It drew on the experiences of 277 applicants and consultants representing a diversity of stakeholders, and provided a valuable check on the quality of processes and procedures of councils with respect to plan implementation and compliance.

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  • Planning and governance under the LGA: Lessons from the RMA experience.

    Borrie, Nancy; Memon, Ali; Ericksen, Neil; Crawford, Janet (2004-06-01)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this report is to identify ways in which experiences gained from the RMA as a devolved and co-operative planning mandate can enable local and central government and other stakeholders to more effectively implement the LGA. The report is based on findings from the FRST-funded research programme on Planning under Co-operative Mandates (PUCM). We argue in this report that the experiences gained from the RMA can inform effective implementation of the LGA in three important respects: Preparation and implementation of LTCCPs; The community consultation process for formulating community outcomes; and Māori participation in planning and governance.

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  • Hotspots: Exotic mosquito risk profiles for New Zealand

    de Wet, Neil; Slaney, David; Ye, Wei; Hales, Simon; Warrick, Richard A. (2005-04)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This document reports the main findings of the first systematic, spatial analyses of risks to New Zealand associated with exotic mosquitoes of current public health concern.

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  • Te Kuiti Group (Late Eocene - Oligocene) lithostratigraphy east of Taranaki Basin in central-western North Island, New Zealand

    Tripathi, Anand Ratnakar Prasad; Kamp, Peter J.J.; Nelson, Campbell S. (2008)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report presents a lithostratigraphy for the Late Eocene - Oligocene Te Kuiti Group that crops out in central-western North Island, New Zealand, between Port Waikato in the north and Awakino in the south. The Te Kuiti Group is a mixed carbonate-siliciclastic succession and includes extensive limestone development in its upper parts. The group is up to several hundred metres thick, and accumulated unconformably above indurated Triassic and Jurassic sedimentary basement. The Te Kuiti Group accumulated east of Taranaki Fault and contains a record of sequence and unconformity development that helps constrain the tectonic development of eastern Taranaki Basin. In particular, it records the timing of the mid-Oligocene transition from extension to crustal shortening. Most of the report is however concerned with rationalisation of the group’s lithostratigraphy to enable the geological signals within it to be inferred.

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  • Accidental child driveway runovers: Exploring Waikato data and the efficacy of existing responses

    Hunter, John; Poulgrain, Hayley Mills; Campbell, Maxine M. (2009)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    While the numbers of accidents are not high, there is little doubt that driveway runovers are an ongoing, often fatal and inevitably avoidable tragedy for children and their families. In many cases the driver is an immediate family member, or a neighbour or friend, which serves to compound the tragedy. This type of accident is, like other unintentional child injuries, preventable. The over-riding objective of this study is to find ways to minimise the incidence and severity of driveway runovers. We also aim to add Waikato data to the existing knowledge base. This report begins with a description of the research process utilised in this project, which combines a literature review with the collection of Waikato data and a review of available resources. Chapter Two presents the literature review, dividing the material into its different sources, then summarising the literature in terms of the three main factors contributing to driveway runovers. The following chapter provides data on Waikato driveway accidents for the period since May 2006. The type and availability of educational resources is then presented. Chapter Four evaluates existing resources and their availability, suggesting how they might be made more accessible to families. It also assesses existing recommendations and provides further suggestions for enhancing driveway safety. These again reflect the three main categories outlined in the literature – human, vehicle and environmental.

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  • Pedalling for safety: Schoolchildren and safe active transport

    Fisher, Kylie; Campbell, Maxine M. (2010)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This research will add to the international body of knowledge around safe active transport and its benefits for individuals and their communities. In order to achieve this, the report begins with a brief description of the risks associated with active transport, 3 and considers why active transport to school should be encouraged, despite the risks. Our dependence on cars is discussed in relation to the prevailing chauffeuring culture, before the objectives of the research are outlined. Chapter one concludes with an account of the methodology used to undertake this research, which combined a literature review and a search for educational resources with some participant observation field research. In chapter 2 we present a summary of the resources available to parents in Hamilton and provide a profile of the city, which is in many ways ideally suited to active transport, though participation rates are low. Chapter 3 discusses the benefits of active transport and the barriers to participation in it. Following a discussion that draws all the various strands together, we evaluate existing strategies with a view to endorsing those most likely to enhance safety, while also offering some further ideas on how to minimise the risks of active transport for children.

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