2,496 results for Report

  • The Bootstrap in Threshold Regression

    Yu, Ping (2008)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper shows that the parametric bootstrap is consistent, and the nonparametric bootstrap is inconsistent for inference on the threshold point in discontinuous threshold regression. An interesting phenomenon is that the asymptotic nonparametric bootstrap distribution of the threshold point is discrete and depends on the sampling path of the original data. This is because the threshold point is essentially a boundary of the sample space, and only bootstrap sampling on the data in the neighborhood of the threshold point is informative. The results are compared with Andrews (2000) where a parameter is on the boundary of the parameter space rather than the sample space. The remedies to the nonparametric bootstrap failure in the literature are also summarized.

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  • Coastal Receiving Environment Assessment (CREA): Future Scenarios

    Croucher, Adrian; Bogle, Miles; OSullivan, Michael (2009)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    In 2005 the Coastal Receiving Environment Assessment (CREA) project was carried out to model the likely deposition of sediment and zinc from stormwater and wastewater in the Auckland City coastal environment over the next 150 years (Croucher et al., 2005). More recently, the CREA models were recalibrated to take into account revised estimates of contaminant loads and additional ??eld data (Croucher et al., 2009). This report describes the use of the recalibrated CREA models to make updated predic- tions of future coastal benthic zinc concentrations, under a range of possible load scenarios. The original CREA modelling (Croucher et al., 2005) also included predictions of future zinc concentrations, but only under a set of very simple load scenarios (with loads held constant in time). Subsequently, future predictions of zinc concentrations were made for Tamaki Estuary (Croucher et al., 2007) using some more realistic load scenarios. The current work uses the same methodology employed for the previous predictions, but uses the recalibrated CREA models and a new set of load scenarios.

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  • Market Innovation ??? how to make and shape markets

    Storbacka, Kaj (2009)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    The management consultancy Vectia Ltd. was founded in 1994 around a particular management innovation, namely that competitive advantage could be built by a better understanding of how to manage existing and new customer relationships. At the outset, the company was called CRM Customer Relationship Management Ltd., in order to pinpoint the importance of a new management practice, related to the management of customer relationships. In the beginning, only the true management innovators were interested in exploring the apparent opportunities involved in viewing customers from a process point of view, rede??? ning the offering in such a way that win-win relationships could be created, and maximizing the potential shareholder value effects of customers.

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  • The Solution Business Model. Boosting Organic Growth through Cross-functional Solution Sales

    Storbacka, Kaj (2010)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper is about accelerating growth through cross-functional solution sales. The objective of this paper is to share Vectia???s views on developing an effective solution business model, especially from a commercialisation and industrialisation point of view.

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  • Gender and Urban Planning: issues and trends

    Reeves, Dorothy; Parfitt, B; Archer, C (2012)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    If policies to improve and enhance places are to address gender inequality, they must also take into account the issues and needs of both women and men. The policy implications are clear. Gender-sensitive urban planning starts with the needs of people in communities. The design of places and spaces needs to reflect the socio-cultural needs of women as well as men, girls as well as boys. Existing policies and programmes need to be scrutinized to see how they can be adapted to become more gender aware and bring about genuine gender equality.

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  • Stories of Success: Mental health service users??? experiences of social inclusion in Aotearoa New Zealand: Na pukorero rangatira: Na tangata waiora i whaiora i enei tuahuatana.

    Hamer, Helen; Clarke, Shona; Butler, R; Lampshire, D; Kidd, Jacqueline (2014)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Evaluation of A&M, HML Telephone Triage, and St John Transport Initiatives: Evaluation Research commissioned under the ???Researching the Better, Sooner, More Convenient Primary Health Care initiative???

    Tenbensel, Timothy; Edlin, Richard; Wilkinson-Meyers, Laura; Field, Adrian; Walton, L; Appleton, S; Dowson; Lee, Rochelle; Snapp, J; Old, A (2014-08-28)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Two initiatives sponsored by the Greater Auckland Integrated Health Network (GAIHN) aim to reduce barriers of access to after-hours and urgent medical care in the community. One of these initiatives, the After-Hours (AH) Initiative was developed and implemented by the Auckland Region After-hours Network (ARAHN). ARAHN consists of 11 Accident and Medical (A&M) centres, 3 District Health Boards (DHBs), and 7 Primary Health Organisations (PHOs). These ARAHN organisations collectively fund two interventions in the Auckland region that were introduced on 5 September 2011. The first of these is the Accident and Medical (A&M) intervention. This covers: ??? Subsidisation of patient co-payments for medical visits to 11 A&M medical clinics across the Auckland region for eligible patients (under 6s, 65 and over, holders of Community Services and/or High User Health Cards; residents of low-income areas). ??? Extension of opening hours of some of these participating A&Ms to 10pm. The second ARAHN-sponsored intervention is the HML telephone triage (HML TT) intervention. This initiative involved the expansion of access to an after-hours telephone triage service offered by HomeCare Medical Limited (HML), a company owned by Auckland???s largest PHO, ProCare. A closely related initiative developed under the GAIHN business plan aims to reduce the number of patients transported to hospital emergency departments (EDs) by St John Ambulance services who can be safely managed in the community. Under the St John Transport (SJT) initiative, which commenced in December 2011, the co-payment for all patients attending specific A&M clinics (the 11in the ARAHN network plus 4 others) is met by POAC (Primary Options for Acute Care), an organisation funded by DHBs. This document reports on the evaluation research of these initiatives led by the University of Auckland. The research was funded by the Health Research Council, in partnership with the Ministry of Health, under the dedicated stream of funding for evaluation of local initiatives that are consistent with the government???s Better, Sooner, More Convenient (BSMC) policy framework for primary health care. The After-Hours and St John Transport initiatives align with the original BSMC objectives, which include: ??? The provision of a wider range of health services in primary care settings more responsive to community needs ??? Reducing acute demand on publicly-funded hospital services This evaluation also builds on a previous evaluation of the After-Hours initiative that was commissioned and funded by ARAHN, and which was published in April 2013 (Tenbensel et al 2013). Our report focuses on the implementation and impacts of the two initiatives. The report addresses five overarching evaluation questions: 1. How effective is each initiative in meeting its primary objectives? 2. How effective are the processes of implementation? 3. What are the key factors that determine effectiveness of each initiative? 4. What other intended and unintended outcomes of the initiatives are there for funders, providers, patients and other stakeholders? 5. How can the initiatives be adapted and improved to be more effective and cost-effective in achieving primary objectives, while minimising adverse consequences? The first four questions are addressed in turn for the A&M intervention, the HML TT intervention and the SJT initiative. The fifth question is addressed in the conclusion of this executive summary, and more fully in the conclusion of Section 1 of this report. Our research team adopted a mixed-methods approach to address these evaluation research questions. This approach combines utilisation analysis, economic modelling, analysis of patient surveys, and interpretation of qualitative data from patients, frontline staff and key informants. We gathered a large range of service utilisation data to build a picture answer the question ???what changed???? Other sources of data allowed us to answer how and why the desired changes did or did not eventuate.

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  • RedLib: A Lightweight Reduction Library for Java

    Mehrabi, Mostafa (2015-01-26)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    Reduction in computer science is the process of combining two or more elements into one. This process is widely used by network based applications for integrating results from di erent computers of a network. It also seems reasonable to use the same mechanism in shared memory applications that run on a single computer. That is, reducing the results that are obtained from di erent threads in a computer into the nal result. However, there are not many libraries that facilitate reduction on single computers, as the main focus has been on network based applications thus far. Considering the bene ts of reduction for improving performance on shared memory applications, developing assistant libraries in this scope is quite worthwhile. In this paper we have introduced an extensive reduction library that has been developed for Java. Moreover, the object oriented considerations of the design have been explained, and it has been clari ed how users bene t from them. Also, we have compared the features provided by our design with a few others that are available in this eld. Further examples in this paper help with clearer understanding of the logic of our design.

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  • Te R??nanga-??-Iwi o Ng??ti Kahu Charitable Trust Amended Submission on the Te Hiku Claims Settlement Bill 2014 to the Special Select Committee

    Mutu, Margaret (2015-03-02)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    Submission to M??ori Affairs Select Committee hearing on Te Hiku Claims Settlement Bill

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  • Practice-based Body of Real Estate Knowledge

    Boyd, D; Amidu, Abdul-Rasheed; Smith, M (2013)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This report explores the body of knowledge and skills required for effective and desirable real estate practice. The research will assist real estate educators and practitioners to align educational outcomes with workplace needs and industry requirements. Data was collected using a modified Delphi technique with a panel of real estate experts practicing in the UK to deliver an anonymous consensus???building process. Two rounds of questionnaire (one unstructured and one structured) were sent to the panel to first identify and later rate a set of practice-based activities. The research will assist real estate educators and practitioners to align educational outcomes with workplace needs and industry requirements.

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  • Two Countries, Sixteen Cities, Five Thousand Kilometres: How Many Housing Markets?

    Greenaway-McGrevy, Ryan; Grimes, Arthur; Holmes, M (2016-03)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    We test whether a single housing market exists across sixteen cities covering two countries, Australia and New Zealand. Distances between these cities are vastly greater than commuting distances. We define a single housing market as one in which a single stochastic trend describes the long run path of real house prices in all cities. A strong form single housing market occurs when an innovation to the stochastic trend affects house prices across all cities multiplicatively to an equal degree. A weak form occurs when an innovation to the stochastic trend affects house prices in all cities, but not to an equal degree. We find that the sixteen housing markets are characterised by a weak form single housing market. The dynamic structure of adjustment reveals three groups of cities. House price shocks are first reflected in the price dynamics of a leading group of Australian cities (including Melbourne and Sydney), then flow to a group of follower cities comprising peripheral Australian and major New Zealand cities, and then to a group of laggard cities within New Zealand. Our theoretical model demonstrates how a weak form single housing market may arise due to differences between cities in house price responses to land prices, migration responses to house prices and/or land price responses to migration flows.

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  • Brief of Evidence of Professor Margaret Mutu???in the matter of ???the free trade agreement known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement Wai 2522 et al in the Waitangi Tribunal, Wellington

    Mutu, Margaret (2016-02-10)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • He Whakaaro Here Whakaumu M?? Aotearoa: The Report of Matike Mai Aotearoa - The Independent Working Group on Constitutional Transformation

    Mutu, Margaret; Jackson, M (2016-02-05)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Affidavit of Professor Margaret Mutu in New Zealand Police v Eva Crockenberg et al in Kait??ia District Court

    Mutu, Margaret (2016-09-05)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A multivariate approach to seasonal adjustment

    Greenaway-McGrevy, Ryan (2013-04)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper suggests a new semi-parametric multivariate approach to seasonal adjustment. The primary innovation is to use a large dimensional factor model of cross section dependence to estimate the trend component in the seasonal decomposition of each time series. Because the trend component is speci??ed to capture covariation between the time series, common changes in the level of the time series are accommodated in the trend, and not in the seasonal component, of the decomposition. The seasonal components are thus less prone to distortion resulting from severe business cycle ??uctuations than univariate ??lter-based seasonal adjustment methods. We illustrate these points this using a dataset that spans the 2007-2009 recession in the US.

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  • Valuation of near-market endogenous assets

    Fixler, D; Greenaway-McGrevy, Ryan (2012-02)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    For many kinds of assets, the growth rate of the real asset stock is a nonlinear function of the economic owner???s decision whether to invest or extract the asset. Examples within the economy are primarily biological assets, both privately owned (such as those found in aquaculature and agriculture) and publicly owned or regulated (such as fish stocks, and in some case, timber stocks.) Optimal exploitation of the asset necessitates that the future possible growth rates in the assetmust be considered when determining the optimal amount of extraction today. In this sense, the level of the asset is determined by the economic owner or regulator and is thus said to be endogenous. This paper considers existing methods for the valuation of these endogenous assets when observed transaction prices are lacking. In particular, we consider valuation in a near-market context, whereby the the economist can only observe income flows from the asset. This near-market approach to asset valuation is particularly important for environmental accounting when transaction prices for the asset or the right to exploit the asset are lacking. We give sufficient restrictions on the revenue and cost structure of the firm in order to permit asset valuation based on average profits. In an emprical application, we combine economic and biomass data to value the US Bering Sea crab fisheries.

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