4,185 results for Report

  • Stories of Success: Mental health service users??? experiences of social inclusion in Aotearoa New Zealand: Na pukorero rangatira: Na tangata waiora i whaiora i enei tuahuatana.

    Hamer, Helen; Clarke, Shona; Butler, R; Lampshire, D; Kidd, Jacqueline (2014)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Maniapoto Upper Waipa River Fisheries Plan

    Rawiri-Watene, E; Kukutai, J; Morgan, G; Neha, E; Fisher, K; Neha, T; Tapara, C; Hikuroa, Daniel; Stockman, P; Searancke, G; Bryant, K; Neha, B (2014-12-01)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Maniapoto Fish Plan was developed by the Maniapoto Fisheries Reference Group through a series of workshops held at Te Keeti Marae in Otorohanga. The plan provides for the protection, restoration and enhancement of the fisheries resources of the Waipa River catchment. To Maniapoto, the Waipa River is a single indivisible entity that flows from Pekepeke to its confluence with the Waikato River and includes its waters, banks, bed (and all minerals under it) and its streams, waterways, tributaries, lakes, fisheries, vegetation, floodplains, wetlands, islands, springs, geothermal springs, water column, airspace and substratum as well as its metaphysical elements with its own mauri. Waiwaia is the spiritual guardian of the Waipa River and the importance of Waiwaia to Maniapoto is boundless. The Waipa River, through Waiwaia, provides for its people the necessary instruments of life. The Waipa River, its tributaries, wetlands and springs are interwoven into the fabric of the Maniapoto people and their identity, tikanga, reo and wellbeing. This sense of wellbeing and connectedness to the awa is reflected in the Plan.

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  • Opportunities and Approaches for Better Nutrition Outcomes through PNPM Generasi: A Qualitative Study Conducted in Sukabumi (West Java), Manggarai Timur (Flores, East Nusa Tenggara), and Pamekasan (Madura, East Java)

    Grayman, Jesse Hession; Anggraini, N; Ruhanawati, S (2014-02)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Developing Board Leadership and Governance in a Professional Service Firm: Frequency Project Management

    Cikaliuk, M; Erakovic, Ljiljana; Jackson, B; Noonan, Christopher; Watson, Susan (2016-07)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Environmental wellbeing of M??ori in T??maki Makaurau: Scoping Report and Implementation Plan

    Kelly, Shane; Hikuroa, Daniel (2015-06)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Now We Are Four: Describing the preschool years

    Morton, Susan; Grant, Cameron; Berry, SD; Walker, Caroline; Corkin, Maria; Ly, Kien; de Castro, TG; Atatoa Carr, PE; Bandara, DK; Mohal, Jatender; Bird, AL; Underwood, Lisa; Fa???alili-Fidow, J (2017-05-15)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Now We Are Four: Describing the preschool years provides insight into the health and wellbeing, and social and emotional functioning of New Zealand four year olds. The report also depicts changes in the children's home environment, participation in early childhood education, household mobility and socioeconomic situation over the first four years of their lives. Using information from direct observations of the children and interviews with their mothers, the report paints a dynamic picture of what it is like to be a child growing up in 21st in New Zealand.

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  • Understanding research on risk and protective factors for intimate partner violence

    Gulliver, Pauline; Fanslow, Janet (2016)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Key messages Conceptual models guide the exploration of risk and protective factors. Conceptual models help us to organise our thoughts and identify relationships between the different risk and protective factors for intimate partner violence, and other forms of violence. Some conceptual models (such as the ecological model) have helped to expand our understanding of the wider societal and community factors that impact on violence experience. Consistent findings at the international level have allowed the identification of a common set of factors that are strongly associated with violence experience, but these are not the only factors that influence the likelihood of violence occurring. There are some challenges involved with measuring some risk or protective factors Most of the research identifying risk and protective factors for intimate partner violence collect information at only one point in time. The result is that it is difficult to establish whether factors that are related to violence experience caused the violence or are a result of experiencing the violence (or both). While, the use of controlling behaviours is strongly associated with violence experience, behaviours can mean different things to different people. It is important to understand the context of an abuser???s behaviour in order to fully understanding the meaning. There is no ???one true cause??? of intimate partner violence. Violence is typically the outcome of the interaction of many different factors. Individual, relationship, community, social and cultural factors work together to enhance or reduce the likelihood of violence being perpetrated or experienced. Violence is a behaviour which is governed by choice. Decisions and subsequent actions are influenced by societal attitudes about what is considered acceptable behaviour. A comprehensive, multi-pronged approach is required to address intimate partner violence as well as other forms of family violence in New Zealand. Lessons can be learned from systematic approaches to addressing other problem behaviour patterns. For example, addressing the road toll required: Investment in infrastructure Legislation to reduce risk Social marketing campaigns Improvements in safety design Swift and sure punishment where laws were broken Increased resourcing at high risk periods Consistent and adequate funding over a sustained period of time To optimise the likelihood of success a long-term investment in policy, infrastructure and communities is required. This needs to be supported by an overall strategic government framework for addressing IPV.

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  • Assessing the effects of fishing on soft sediment habitat, fauna and process

    Tuck, Ian; Hewitt, Judi; Handley, SJ; Lundquist, Carolyn (2017-01)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Dedicated and opportunistic studies on the effects of fishing on the seabed have been collated across a range of New Zealand habitats, to determine the most useful approaches, and effects at the scale of the fishery. The magnitude of the effects varied with effort gradient, were greater for epifauna, and were greater for dedicated sampling studies. Effects included reduced diversity and number of taxa. Species that stand erect of the seabed or live on the sediment surface were most vulnerable.

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  • Characterisation and a length-based assessment model for scampi (Metanephrops challengeri) on the Mernoo Bank (SCI 3)

    Tuck, Ian (2016-10)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    A fishery characterisation and stock assessment have been undertaken and accepted for SCI 3. A three stock model was developed, based on previous studies. Models excluding trawl or photo surveys were examined. Both approaches suggest SSB is currently around 54???60% SSB0. Models excluding trawl surveys suggest stock status would improve to 70% SSB0 by 2020 with future catches at the TACC, while models excluding the photo survey stock status would decline to 42% SSB0

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  • Estimating the abundance of scampi in SCI 6A (Auckland Islands) in 2016

    Tuck, Ian; Parkinson, D; Armiger, H; Smith, M; Miller, A; Rush, N; Spong, K (2017-01)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Photographic and trawl surveys of scampi in SCI 6A were conducted in February/March 2016. The photographic survey estimates of scampi and burrows both showed an increase on the 2013 estimate. The trawl survey estimate reflects a marked reduction from 2013, but an enforced vessel change raised questions over comparability with the previous series. Almost 3900 scampi were tagged and released to investigate growth and some animals have been recaptured by industry.

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  • An assessment of the Hauraki Gulf Cableway Protection Zone (CPZ), relative to adjacent seafloor

    Morrison, M; Tuck, Ian; Taylor, Richard; Miller, A (2016-02)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Hauraki Gulf Cable Protection Area is a mapped corridor where fishing and anchoring is prohibited, protecting a major international communications cable. This report describes an ecological survey of the cable protection area and assesses impacts on seafloor communities.

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  • Feasibility study for EEZ-scale Marine Trophic Index

    Pinkerton, M; Tuck, Ian (2016-06)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Characterisation and length-based assessment model for scampi (Metanephrops challengeri) in the Bay of Plenty (SCI 1) and Hawke Bay??? Wairarapa (SCI 2)

    Tuck, Ian (2016-10)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Assessments of SCI 1 and SCI 2 stocks have been updated, and both were accepted. For SCI 1, SSB remains stable at around 75% SSB0. Fishing intensity has consistently been below F 40% B0. For SCI 2, SSB has continued to increase, and is between 89% and 113% SSB0. Fishing intensity peaked in 2002 but has declined in recent years, while SSB/SSB0 has increased. For both stocks, future catches up to 156 tonnes (SCI 1) or 200 tonnes (SCI 2) to 2021 are not predicted to reduce the SSB below 40% SSB0.

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  • Estimating the abundance of scampi in SCI 1 (Bay of Plenty) and SCI 2 (Wairarapa / Hawke Bay) in 2015

    Tuck, Ian; Parkinson, D; Armiger, H; Smith, M; Miller, A; Rush, N; Spong, K (2016-04)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Photographic and trawl surveys of scampi in SCI 1 and 2 were conducted in February/March 2015. For SCI 1 both surveys suggest that population biomass and abundance has remained relatively stable since the early 2000s. For SCI 2 both surveys suggest that population biomass and abundance has increased since 2006. About 5600 scampi were tagged and released to investigate growth, and recaptures to date have been low. Scampi emergence patterns were investigated with acoustic tags.

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  • Survey of scallops in SCA7, January 2017

    Williams, JR; Parkinson, DP; Drury, J; Roberts, CL; Bian, R; Tuck, Ian (2017-05)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This report describes a January 2017 dredge survey of scallops (Pecten novaezelandiae) in the Southern scallop stock, SCA 7 (Golden Bay, Tasman Bay, Marlborough Sounds). Estimates of scallop population distribution, size structure, and biomass derived from the survey were compared with estimates made from previous surveys to establish if changes had occurred in the population. To aid comparability, new estimates of scallop growth in key areas were generated and used in population projections.

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  • An Exact Method for Computing the Frustration Index in Signed Networks Using Binary Programming

    Arefkashfi, Seyedsamin; Mason, Andrew; Wilson, Mark (2016-11-28)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Computing the frustration index of a signed graph is a key to solving problems in different fields of research including social networks, physics, material science, and biology. In social networks the frustration index determines network distance from a state of structural balance. Although the definition of frustration index goes back to 1960, an exact algorithmic computation method has not yet been proposed. The main reason seems to be the complexity of computing the frustration index which is closely related to well-known NP-hard problems such as MAXCUT. New quadratic and linear binary programming models are developed to compute the frustration index exactly. Using the Gurobi solver, we evaluate the frustration index on real-world and synthetic datasets. The synthetic data involves Erd??s-R??nyi networks, Barab??si-Albert networks, and specially structured random graphs. We also use well-known datasets from the sociology literature, such as signed networks inferred from students' choice and rejection as well as datasets from the biology literature including gene regulatory networks. We also provide some results on the frustration index of a political network of countries over time. The results show that exact values of the frustration index can be efficiently computed using our suggested optimisation models. We find that most real-world social networks and some biological networks exhibit a relatively low level of frustration which indicates that they are close to balanced.

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  • Introduction

    Wratten, Stephen D.; Sandhu, H.; Cullen, Ross; Costanza, R.

    Report
    Lincoln University

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  • Tauira Rangatahi Numeracy and Literacy Programme: Apps in Numeracy and Literacy Research

    Calder, Nigel Stuart; Campbell, Anthony (2014)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A key aspect of tertiary education undertaken by Te Wananga o Aotearoa (TWoA) is re-establishing engagement and success in the rangatahi space through meeting the literacy and numeracy demands for programmes at levels 1–3. TWoA has Youth Guarantee programmes that deliver introductory Sport and Leisure and Contemporary Māori Arts programmes with embedded literacy and numeracy. The purpose of this research project was to investigate tauira rangatahi attitudes towards literacy and numeracy development through the application of appropriate cultural capital in conjunction with contemporary digital technologies. The research examined the influence of iPad apps on the beliefs and attitudes of Youth Guarantee tauira towards numeracy and literacy.

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  • Chief’s Mana in action; a study investigating the team’s perspective.

    Howarth, Joelene; Smith, Tiaki Brett; Galbraith, David (2016)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Team culture, and its relevance to performance behaviour and attitudes, has recently gained increased focus in sport psychology research and practice (Schroeder, 2010; Cruickshank & Collins 2012; Morgan, Fletcher & Sarkar, 2014). Cruickshank and Collins (2012) state that“high performing cultures prevail when the shared perception and action of the elite team environment members; (a) supports sustained optimal performance; (b) persists across time in the face of variable results(i.e. wins, losses, ties); and most importantly, (c) leads to consistently high performance” (p.340). Spink et al. (2013) found preliminary evidence that a positive psychological climate, as defined by the significance and meaning of the work environment to the individual, is also linked to increased athlete effort. Various researchers suggests that it is a difficult task to change, cultivate and maintain a team culture, that is the social and psychological environment, which promotes best performance (Cruickshank & Collins 2012; Schroeder, 2010).

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  • A pilot study of the application of degree apprenticeships in New Zealand: A focus on infrastructure asset management.

    Goodyer, J; Poskitt, J; Mackay, J

    Report
    Massey University

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