2,484 results for Report

  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Southern District Health Board 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Northern District Health Boards 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Midland Region 2016

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Morris, Simon; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Chronic conditions and disabilities often affect people for life. Having a good quality of life and flourishing to your best ability is dependent, at least in part, on what happened as you were growing up. Understanding the dimensions of chronic conditions and disabilities among children and young people is essential to planning and developing good quality health services for New Zealand’s children and young people. Two issues were selected by participating DHBs for review and inclusion in this report: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) by Judith Adams, and the Health needs of children and young people in State care by Mavis Duncanson. This report reviews the prevalence of a range of disabilities and chronic conditions experienced by children and young people living in New Zealand. These conditions place demands on health and disability support services. This report provides information on the secondary health service utilisation patterns of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities. It is unable to provide data on all health service use as these data are not collated nationally. It does, however, aim to provide some insights into two quite different perspectives of disability and chronic conditions: the consequences and management of children with fetal alcohol syndrome, and a review of the health needs of children in care.

    View record details
  • Te Ohonga Ake The Health Status of Māori Children and Young People in New Zealand Series Two

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-04)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections:  Issues in infancy  Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds  Conditions of the respiratory system  Common communicable diseases  Unintentional injury  Reproductive health  Mental health

    View record details
  • The Health Status of Pacific Children and Young People in New Zealand 2015

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Pierson, Melanie; Gallagher, Sarah (2017-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Despite some recent improvements, Pacific peoples in New Zealand continue to experience greater disadvantage across a range of socioeconomic indicators. Improving incomes, education, employment and housing is critical to improving health outcomes. The report aims to provide an overview of the health status of Pacific children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to use collated recent data when they are developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health needs. Within each section data are provided for Pacific children and young people aged 0–24 years with comparative national data for selected indicators. This report provides an overview of the health status of Pacific children and young people in New Zealand to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic way. The Ministry of Health, district health boards, Pacific health providers and others working in the health sector may use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views.

    View record details
  • Fa'atuatuaga Kerisiano ma Sauaga i totonu o Aiga: Ripoti mo Tagata Lautele o Samoa i Niusila

    Ah Sir-Maliko, Mercy (2016-08)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is available in both English and Samoan

    View record details
  • Christian Faith and Family Violence: A Report for Samoan communities in New Zealand

    Ah Siu-Maliko, Mercy (2016-08)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The report is available in both English and Samoan.

    View record details
  • Listening to Male Survivors of Church Sexual Abuse

    Figueroa Alvear, Rocío; Tombs, David (2016-12)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is available in English and Spanish

    View record details
  • Escuchando a sobrevivientes masculinos de abuso sexual en la Iglesia

    Figueroa Alvear, Rocío; Tombs, David (2016-12)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is available in English and Spanish

    View record details
  • Care and Protection Orders and CYFS

    Atwool, Nicola; Gunn, Tracey (2012)

    Report
    University of Otago

    View record details
  • On the Edge: Shifting Teachers’ Paradigms for the Future

    Gilbert, J; Bull, A

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This project was designed to explore the conditions needed for New Zealand teachers to experience the transformational learning we argue is needed for future-oriented schooling. Its focus was teachers’ thinking. The research looked at how a group of teachers’ thinking changed as they participated in a professional learning and development (PLD) programme. This PLD had two parts: a university course on educational futures, and a workshop designed to support cognitive growth.

    View record details
  • Evaluating a Shared Spaces Intervention. A Case Study of Street Users in Auckland, New Zealand

    Oliver, M; Badland, HM; Duncan, S; Wooller, L; Wright, R; Miner-Williams, W

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    The environmental qualities of urban spaces have the potential to influence peoples’ behaviours, including mode of transport and physical activity patterns, shopper spending habits, and social engagement and behavioural characteristics. Increasingly, urban planners and transport engineers are integrating concepts such as self -­‐ explaining roads and shared spaces into environmental design approaches, for improved driver behaviour, pedestrian safety, and health behaviours. Despite this, research focusing on the effects of such interventions is limited, largely due to the substantial expense of implementing built environment infrastructure, and a general disconnect between researchers and regulatory bodies responsible for intervention implementation. Greater focu s needs to be on understanding the effects these interventions can have on the general population, to inform future infrastructural initiatives and investment. This study compares the profiles and perceptions of street users immediately post and sixteen mo nths after a major streetscape upgrade to a shared spaces mode in the the Fort Street precinct (central business district), in Auckland, New Zealand. A convenience sample strategy was employed for data collection and participants completed in -­‐ person survey s . Descriptive data treatment and inferential statistical analyses were undertaken to compare user profiles and opinions pre and post streetscape upgrades. In total , 373 street users in the Fort Street precinct participated in this research. Overall, findi ngs indicate positive perceptions of the Fort Street upgrades and positive impacts on health -­‐ related behaviours. Recommendations for further improvements to the area predominantly focused on improving pedestrian safety, including reducing traffic speeds, r educing car usage of the area, and providing better clarity on appropriate driver behaviours.

    View record details
  • Entrepreneurial Actors in Transport Systems. An Energy Cultures Perspective

    Walton, Sara; Hyde, Abbe; Patel, Vibhuti (2016)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Moving to a low carbon economy in New Zealand requires a considerable shift in the current transport system as a whole (Carrington et al, 2014). Indeed, the New Zealand transportation system in has a number of key issues including old vehicle stock, old inefficient ICE engines, lack of rail infrastructure investment, low petrol taxes relative to OECD countries and a focus on road building (Vivid Economics & University of Auckland Business School, 2012). Given the complexity involved, shifting the current transport socio-technical systems (with the reliance on the ICE) will be difficult. Starting a business that relies on shifting such an embedded regime can thus be a hard journey. This report looks at the entrepreneurs operating businesses that challenge the mainstream and dominant transportation regime in New Zealand. They can be considered brave people by introducing new products and services into the market that challenge the reliance on fossil fuels in transportation. This report explores each entrepreneurial venture to understand their operations, what alternatives is being offered and what the barriers are to that venture. With barriers comes opportunities and these entrepreneurs are seeing and seizing opportunities that may have the potential together to shift the regime from its current form into something that is more sustainable for the future.

    View record details
  • Networks of support for Māori mental health: The response and recovery of Tangata Whaiora through the Ōtautahi earthquakes

    Lambert, Simon J.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This report presents the experiences of Tangata Whaiora (Mental health clients) through the disastrous earthquakes that struck Otautahi/Christchurch in 2010-11. It further analysis these experience to how show the social networks these individuals, their whānau, supporting staff respond and recover to a significant urban disaster. The disaster challenged the mental health of those individuals who are impacted and the operations of organisations and networks that support and care for the mentally ill. How individuals and their families navigate a post-disaster landscape provides an unfortunate but unique opportunity to analyse how these support networks respond to severe disruption. Tangata Whaiora possess experiences of micro-scale personal and family disasters and were not necessarily shocked by the loss of normality in Ōtautahi as a result of the earthquakes. The organic provision of clear leadership, outstanding commitment by staff, and ongoing personal and institutional dedication in the very trying circumstances of working in a post-disaster landscape all contributed to Te Awa o te Ora’s notable response to the disaster.

    View record details
  • New Zealanders with Disabilities and their Internet Use

    Smith, P

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This report presents the findings from a series of interviews conducted with New Zealanders with disabilities who talked about their experiences of Internet use. For people with disabilities in New Zealand, living in the digital age has much wider implications when it comes to their access and accessibility. This report presents the findings from interviews conducted with 11 New Zealanders with a range of disabilities about their Internet use. A description of the study design is outlined in Section One, followed by the presentation of the findings of the research in Section Two. These findings look at firstly, how the participants engage in certain strategies to enable their Internet use in relation to their disability or impairment; secondly, the various online activities they like to participate in; thirdly, the range of barriers they have encountered in their Internet use; and, fourthly, participants’ attitudes towards the Internet and how it has impacted on their lives in terms of technology and independence, identity and socialisation. The conclusion in Section Three reflects upon the findings of the research, offers recommendations and makes suggestions for future research

    View record details
  • News, Politics and Diversity in the 2014 New Zealand General Election

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

    View record details
  • Challenges and Recommendations for the Design and Conduct of Global Software Engineering Courses: A Systematic Review

    Beecham, S; Clear, T; Barr, J; Noll, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This SLR we are conducting traverses the many options available to Computer Science (CS) educators teaching CS courses involving global collaboration. The challenges and solutions in conducting global software engineering courses will be addressed. While there is a rich source of literature covering this topic, there is limited consolidated guidance available for CS educators wishing to implement a global course, in collaboration with other institutions. So building upon the existing knowledge in the literature in the area will help to produce a report that will serve as a broad ranging resource for global software engineering educators. The SLR focusses on two areas: 1. Learning GSE Theory: Developing courses based on GSE theory. I.e. How to teach students about developing software across multi-site teams (to include things like cultural training – i.e. how to build trust amongst a team that hasn’t met face to face, etc.). AND 2. Learning GSE by doing: Developing courses that show how to apply GSE methods in the classroom. E.g. where students develop software in multi-site teams (where the software developed is not really the focus, but ‘how’ to develop the software is what we would be looking at). We also include studies that take a hybrid approach by including a combination of theory and practice. I.e. research that presents experiences of running hybrid courses aimed at developing student capabilities in working as global professionals which have varying degrees of cross-site collaboration, and theorypractice balance.

    View record details
  • The Te Hoe Shore Whaling Station Artefact Assemblage

    Harris, Jaden; Smith, Ian (2005-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report presents an analysis of the Te Hoe Shore Whaling Station artefact assemblage, exclusive of faunal remains, wood and charcoal. The Te Hoe site, located on the East Coast of the North Island of New Zealand, was excavated in January/February 2005 as part of a larger project investigating early European communities in New Zealand. Shore whaling was a prominent extractive industry in New Zealand in the 1830s and 1840s and in many areas whalers were the first European settlers to arrive in this country. The primary aim in documenting their material culture is to get a more detailed picture of how whalers adapted to life in New Zealand, and to understand what influences if any they had on the subsequent development of European settlement. To this end the present paper attempts to give detailed descriptive analysis of the artefacts and place them within both a spatial and temporal context.

    View record details
  • Artefacts from the Oashore Shore Whaling Station

    Harris, Jaden; Smith, Ian (2005-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report presents an analysis of the artefactual assemblage from the Oashore whaling station and is largely a revision of a work originally submitted as a Masters Thesis (Harris 2005). Shore whaling was a brutally efficient industry for a short period in the 1830s and 1840s and represents some of the earliest European settlement in New Zealand. The excavation of the Oashore whaling station, located on Banks Peninsula, South Island of New Zealand, in January/February 2004 represents the first part of a major research orientated project on shore whaling in New Zealand. The present paper aims to document the range of material culture available to the Oashore whalers to help shed some light on what life was like for a shore whaler and to investigate how these communities compare or contrast with other contemporaneous European sites. To this end the Oashore artefactual material, exclusive of faunal remains and charcoal or wood, has been described, quantified, and dated where possible.

    View record details
  • Excavations at the Oashore Whaling Station: (M37/162) Banks Peninsula January–February 2004

    Smith, Ian; Prickett, Nigel (2006)

    Report
    University of Otago

    View record details