4,185 results for Report

  • The wider voice: Wanganui community perspectives on adult literacy and employment 2005-2006

    Comrie, M; Tilley, E; Neilson, D; Murray, N; Sligo, F; Vaccarino, F

    Report
    Massey University

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  • MY FRIENDS Youth final evaluation report

    MacDonald, J; Bourke, R; Berg, M; Burgon, J

    Report
    Massey University

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  • Kia Piki te Ora Suicide Prevention Programme Evaluation Final Report

    Andrews, CA; Manu, H

    Report
    Massey University

    Suicide and suicidal behaviour continue to be a major public health issue in New Zealand. Each year more than 500 New Zealanders take their lives and there are over 2500 admissions to hospital for intentional self-harm. The latest statistics in 2012 show that almost one in five completed suicides were Māori suicides and the Māori youth suicide rates were 2.8 times higher than non-Māori youth. Kia Piki te Ora Māori suicide prevention service (Kia Piki te Ora), operating in nine DHB regions is one element of the social sector’s work towards longer-term goals of reduced suicides, and harm associated with suicidal behaviour in Māori communities. This recent evaluation report shows that generally stakeholders felt that Kia Piki te Ora’s contribution to Māori suicide prevention worked well when providers engaged with the community. However, the widespread of activities undertaken by the nine providers meant that in some instances stakeholders were unclear on the core role and responsibilities of Kia Piki te Ora.

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  • Energy-smart food for people and climate

    Sims, RE

    Report
    Massey University

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  • Developing Valid and Reliable Rubrics for Writing Assessment: Research and Practice

    Comer, KV

    Report
    Massey University

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  • Technical report two: Analysis of curriculum documents.

    Ballantyne, N; Beddoe, L; Hay, K; Maidment, J; Ngan, L; Walker, S

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • The sustainable delivery of sexual violence prevention education in schools

    Julich, SJ; Oak, E; Terrell, J; Good, G

    Report
    Massey University

    Sexual violence is a crime that cannot be ignored: it causes our communities significant consequences including heavy economic costs, and evidence of its effects can be seen in our criminal justice system, public health system, Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC), and education system, particularly in our schools. Many agencies throughout New Zealand work to end sexual violence. Auckland-based Rape Prevention Education: Whakatu Mauri (RPE) is one such agency, and is committed to preventing sexual violence by providing a range of programmes and initiatives, information, education, and advocacy to a broad range of audiences. Up until early 2014 RPE employed one or two full-time positions dedicated to co-ordinating and training a large pool (up to 15) of educators on casual contracts to deliver their main school-based programmes, BodySafe – approximately 450 modules per year, delivered to some 20 high schools. Each year several of the contract educators, many of whom were tertiary students, found secure full time employment elsewhere. To retain sufficient contract educators to deliver its BodySafe contract meant that RPE had to recruit, induct and train new educators two to three times every year. This model was expensive, resource intense, and ultimately untenable. The Executive Director and core staff at RPE wanted to develop a more efficient and stable model of delivery that fitted its scarce resources. To enable RPE to know what the most efficient model was nationally and internationally, with Ministry of Justice funding, RPE commissioned Massey University to undertake this report reviewing national and international research on sexual violence prevention education (SVPE). [Background from Executive Summary.]

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  • Smaller scale New Zealand dairy farmers: long term plans and key challenges

    Westbrooke, Victoria; Nuthall, Peter; Phillips, Tom

    Report
    Massey University

    Farmer wellbeing has been defined as “a dynamic process that gives people a sense of how their lives are evolving” (Nimpagariste & Culver, 2010). In order to support and enhance the wellbeing of farmers in New Zealand, the farmers’ goals, future plans and challenges to their plans all need to be understood. A particular group of interest is smaller scale dairy farmers. The average size of dairy farms in developed agricultural nations is increasing and New Zealand is no different. A high proportion (62%) of NZ dairy herds are smaller scale, milking less than 400 cows at peak. Their wellbeing, now and in the future, is important to the New Zealand dairy industry as a whole. Consequently, the aim of this study is to develop an understanding of smaller-scale dairy farmers’ future goals, plans and challenges so that recommendations can be made to enhance and support their wellbeing in the future. Farms who peak milked less than 400 cows were surveyed via telephone. A total of 346 surveys were completed, in Taranaki (n=103), the Waikato (n=144) and Northland (n=99). The majority of respondents’ were owner-operators (75%), male (67%), born and bred in a rural area (79%), and between 40 and 60 years old (57%). Overall, the mean farm size was 97ha, with 240 cows producing 86,789kgMS with 0.83 of a full time employee. Respondents’ had high (67%) equity levels in their businesses and a third (35%) had non-farming investments. Farmers’ most likely future investments were related to their current farming business, that is reducing debt to very low levels and increasing production by more than 10%. Based on farmers future plans and challenges reported and discussed in this study, it is clear the smaller scale dairy farmers would like knowledge and assistance in five key areas; succession, regulation and compliance, staff, technology and cash-flow/profitability. This report concludes with suggestions for each of these areas, which has the potential to maintain or increase the wellbeing of smaller scale dairy farmers in New Zealand. [Executive summary]

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  • Te Ao Hurihuri population: Past, present & future

    Kukutai, Tahu; Rarere, Moana (2014-07)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The NIDEA Te Ao Hurihuri series uses data from the New Zealand Census of Population and Dwellings to examine key aspects of Maori population change.

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  • Western Bay of Plenty District: Demographic Profile 1986 - 2031

    Jackson, Natalie; Rarere, Moana (2014-05)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report outlines the demographic changes that have occurred in Western Bay of Plenty District, as well as what trends are expected in the future.

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  • Total value of irrigation land in Canterbury

    Saunders, Caroline; Saunders, John

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The purpose of this report is to provide CDC with the ability to estimate the total benefits for Canterbury and New Zealand from irrigation scenarios under the implementation of the Canterbury Water Strategy. This report describes a series of assumptions which under pin a model for valuing irrigation. The model is built allowing different prices, uptake rates, irrigated area and different land uses of irrigated land, to be defined. The prices valuing land use are informed from both international and national data sources and use the Lincoln Trade and Environment Model (LTEM) to allow the possibility of different international policy market scenarios to be modelled. Using these sources the model assigns values to different land uses under irrigation, and projects price trends until to 2031. The model gives final outputs in total revenue and employment effects from 2014 to 2031. This includes the direct, indirect and induced effects by using the Canterbury Economic Development Model. The results presented here are based on a five year rate of uptake and predicted land uses of irrigated area as 58 per cent dairy, 18 per cent irrigated sheep and beef, 20 per cent arable and 3 per cent high-value arable. Additionally irrigated land in all scenarios is assumed to have been previously utilised for dryland sheep and beef farms.

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  • Aquatic ecology of Lake Rotokare, Taranaki, and options for restoration

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Bell, Dudley G.; Duggan, Ian C.; Wood, Susanna A.; Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Rotokare is a 17.8-ha natural lake in eastern Taranaki, located 12 km east of Eltham in the 230-ha Rotokare Scenic Reserve. In 2008, the Rotokare Scenic Reserve Trust completed construction of an 8.2-km predator proof fence around the reserve. Frequent algal blooms in summer have led to long periods of lake closure to boating and contact recreation. As there are few lakes in the Taranaki region, these closures are a nuisance to the local community. The objectives of this study were to quantitatively survey the fish community of the lake and to evaluate the lake water quality for the Rotokare Scenic Reserve Trust for the purpose of advising on options for lake restoration. Water quality has not deteriorated since 1976-1980, and, if anything, has improved. Secchi disc depth in 2013 (1.95 m) was very similar to measurements in summer 1980 (mean 1.93 m on 30 January 1980). Mean dissolved reactive phosphorus (± 95% confidence interval) was greater in 1976 (190±50 mg/m³) than mean phosphate concentration in 2013 (93±31 mg/m³, p < 0.05, Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-sample test). The thermocline was deeper in 2013 at 6-7 m compared to 3-4 m in 1977. This indicates that a much greater volume of the lake was oxygenated in February 2013 than in February 1977. Also, the intensity of stratification was less in 2013, as the dissolved oxygen concentration below the thermocline was 21027% compared to just 3% in 1977. This suggests that an improvement in water quality has occurred, probably as a result of stock exclusion. To sample the fish community, boat electrofishing was used at the total of six sites. The total length fished was 1,656 m, which was 6,624 m² in area. Eighty minutes of boat electrofishing caught 234 fish (217 perch, 16 shortfin eels, and 1 longfin eel). Fishing at night showed a 16-fold increase in the catch rate of perch (125 fish/10 min of fishing) compared to fishing during the day (8 fish/10 min of fishing). Perch dominate the fish community in Lake Rotokare and the biomass and density of eels are low, which is unusual for Taranaki water bodies. The mean density of perch was 4.49 fish/100 m², and the mean density for eels was 0.29 fish/100 m². The lower eel density may be a result of impaired access for eels or may be the result of predation by perch on migrant juvenile eels. There have been changes in the zooplankton community since 1980. The North American invader Daphnia galeata was not found in 1980, and appears to have now replaced the cladoceran Bosmina meridionalis and copepod Boeckella sp. We also found a diverse rotifer community.

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  • Storm water inflow to Oranga Lake, University of Waikato Hamilton Campus

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Hamilton, David P. (2014)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Oranga Lake is one of three constructed lakes located on the University of Waikato Hamilton campus. It has had persistent problems of high turbidity, prolific seasonal macrophyte growths and phytoplankton blooms. Recent restoration measures of pest fish removal, sediment removal and alum dosing resulted in some improvements in water clarity. But these improvements appear to have been largely temporary and water clarity is low, reducing the aesthetic value of the lake which is located in a prominent area of the campus. This study was commissioned by Facilities Management Division of the University of Waikato to determine the extent to which inputs from the main storm water inflow to Oranga Lake contribute to poor water clarity in the lake. Discharge, suspended sediment and nutrients were sampled from the main inflow on 12 occasions. These samples related to four storm events over a three-month period from November 2013 to January 2014. Sampling was conducted with the objective of capturing periods of high, medium and low flows during three separate storm events. This was achieved on two occasions during November; however, the low-intensity, short-duration storm events that occurred in January resulted in limited runoff and were not considered representative of a major summer storm event.

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  • Complementary pathways to sustainability

    Hunt, Lesley M.

    Report
    Lincoln University

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  • Causal mapping of ARGOS dairy farms and comparisons to sheep/beef farms

    Fairweather, John R.; Hunt, Lesley M.; Rosin, C.; Campbell, H.

    Report
    Lincoln University

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  • An analysis of Zespri's 2003 Organic Kiwifruit Database: factors affecting production

    Hunt, Lesley M.; Fairweather, John R.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    A database of many variables collected by Zespri from their organic kiwifruit growers and packhouses has been used to find any factors that might enhance the production of larger fruit or higher production volumes. The Zespri database for the 2002-2003 growing season, containing information on 185 organic Hayward Green and 35 organic Hort16A orchards was analysed to produce summaries of variables such as the percentages and production levels of fruit in each size over all orchards. These variables were also related to the spray regimes used for mineral oil and Bt spray and the geographical location. As the data were not taken from controlled and designed scientific experiments, the results demonstrating relationships between spraying regimes and location and production variables do not show cause and effect, but should be taken as indications of what might be happening in these orchards. The database makes many links about the enhancement of production by a consideration of spraying regimes and geographical location, and there are many more ways in which the data could be used to suggest future areas worthy of further exploration and research.

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  • The influence of perceptions of New Zealand identity on attitudes to biotechnology

    Hunt, Lesley M.; Fairweather, John R.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    Attitudes to specific biotechnologies may be linked to certain beliefs or perceptions individuals have about their identity as New Zealanders. Ten statements about New Zealand identity were included in a nationwide survey on public attitudes to biotechnology, carried out in 2003. This report considers the links that were found in this survey between New Zealand identity characteristics and biotechnology attitudes.

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  • 50 years of the AERU : an examination and summary of past research

    Driver, Tim; Greer, Glen

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The AERU at Lincoln University celebrates its 50th jubilee in August 2012. The fortunes of the AERU have fluctuated during the last fifty years, but it has continued to fulfil the role for which it was established; to research issues of importance to New Zealand’s agricultural sector and to the national economy. Research themes have reflected the interests and expertise of the Unit’s ten Directors and of the many staff members, associates and visitors who have contributed to its research achievements. Today the AERU undertakes a diverse range of economic, market and sociological research for an equally diverse range of New Zealand and international clients. This chronicle describes the influences on AERU research, the nature of its research, and the people who have been involved with AERU research during the last fifty years.

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  • The representativeness of ARGOS panels and between panel comparisons

    Fairweather, John R.; Hunt, Lesley M.; Cook, Andrew J.; Rosin, C.; Campbell, H.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The core of the ARGOS research design is a longitudinal panel study. Panels of 12 farms were selected to represent conventional, integrated and organic management for the sheep/beef sector, Kiwigreen, gold and organic management for the kiwifruit sector, and conventional and organic management for the dairy sector. The research involves gathering data on these farms in order to assess the nature of production from environmental, economic and social points of view and the design rests on testing the null hypothesis that there is no difference between management systems. Farms in the panels were generally typical of their sectors in terms of obvious characteristics such as size, level of production etc. Farms from a range of geographies and with different levels of intensity of production were chosen in order to achieve results that would be applicable to a broad range of farms. Behind this design is the assumption that the panels are reasonably representative of the sectors to which they belong. The analysis presented in this report tests this assumption. Survey data from both the panels and the sectors are used in order to make comparisons on a number of dimensions of farming.

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  • New Zealand farmer and grower attitude and opinion survey: kiwifruit sector

    Fairweather, John R.; Hunt, Lesley M.; Cook, Andrew J.; Rosin, C.; Benge, J.; Campbell, H.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The specific research objective addressed in this report is to assess the kiwifruit sector on a number of topical dimensions. In addition, a related objective is to assess how these dimensions may vary by management system (gold, green and organic). The core of the ARGOS research design is a longitudinal panel study. Panels of 12 farms were selected to represent conventional, integrated and organic management for the sheep/beef sector, green, gold (both employing IPM practices according to ZESPRI’s plant protection programmes) and organic management for the kiwifruit sector, and conventional and organic management for the dairy sector. The research involves gathering data on these farms in order to assess the nature of production from environmental, economic and social points of view and the design rests on testing the null hypothesis that there is no difference between management systems. Farms in the panels were generally typical of their sectors in terms of obvious characteristics such as size, level of production etc. Farms from a range of geographies and with different levels of intensity of production were chosen in order to achieve results that would be applicable to a broad range of farms.

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