2,462 results for Report

  • Entrepreneurial Actors in Transport Systems. An Energy Cultures Perspective

    Walton, Sara; Hyde, Abbe; Patel, Vibhuti (2016)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Moving to a low carbon economy in New Zealand requires a considerable shift in the current transport system as a whole (Carrington et al, 2014). Indeed, the New Zealand transportation system in has a number of key issues including old vehicle stock, old inefficient ICE engines, lack of rail infrastructure investment, low petrol taxes relative to OECD countries and a focus on road building (Vivid Economics & University of Auckland Business School, 2012). Given the complexity involved, shifting the current transport socio-technical systems (with the reliance on the ICE) will be difficult. Starting a business that relies on shifting such an embedded regime can thus be a hard journey. This report looks at the entrepreneurs operating businesses that challenge the mainstream and dominant transportation regime in New Zealand. They can be considered brave people by introducing new products and services into the market that challenge the reliance on fossil fuels in transportation. This report explores each entrepreneurial venture to understand their operations, what alternatives is being offered and what the barriers are to that venture. With barriers comes opportunities and these entrepreneurs are seeing and seizing opportunities that may have the potential together to shift the regime from its current form into something that is more sustainable for the future.

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  • Networks of support for Māori mental health: The response and recovery of Tangata Whaiora through the Ōtautahi earthquakes

    Lambert, Simon J.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This report presents the experiences of Tangata Whaiora (Mental health clients) through the disastrous earthquakes that struck Otautahi/Christchurch in 2010-11. It further analysis these experience to how show the social networks these individuals, their whānau, supporting staff respond and recover to a significant urban disaster. The disaster challenged the mental health of those individuals who are impacted and the operations of organisations and networks that support and care for the mentally ill. How individuals and their families navigate a post-disaster landscape provides an unfortunate but unique opportunity to analyse how these support networks respond to severe disruption. Tangata Whaiora possess experiences of micro-scale personal and family disasters and were not necessarily shocked by the loss of normality in Ōtautahi as a result of the earthquakes. The organic provision of clear leadership, outstanding commitment by staff, and ongoing personal and institutional dedication in the very trying circumstances of working in a post-disaster landscape all contributed to Te Awa o te Ora’s notable response to the disaster.

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  • New Zealanders with Disabilities and their Internet Use

    Smith, P

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This report presents the findings from a series of interviews conducted with New Zealanders with disabilities who talked about their experiences of Internet use. For people with disabilities in New Zealand, living in the digital age has much wider implications when it comes to their access and accessibility. This report presents the findings from interviews conducted with 11 New Zealanders with a range of disabilities about their Internet use. A description of the study design is outlined in Section One, followed by the presentation of the findings of the research in Section Two. These findings look at firstly, how the participants engage in certain strategies to enable their Internet use in relation to their disability or impairment; secondly, the various online activities they like to participate in; thirdly, the range of barriers they have encountered in their Internet use; and, fourthly, participants’ attitudes towards the Internet and how it has impacted on their lives in terms of technology and independence, identity and socialisation. The conclusion in Section Three reflects upon the findings of the research, offers recommendations and makes suggestions for future research

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  • News, Politics and Diversity in the 2014 New Zealand General Election

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Challenges and Recommendations for the Design and Conduct of Global Software Engineering Courses: A Systematic Review

    Beecham, S; Clear, T; Barr, J; Noll, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This SLR we are conducting traverses the many options available to Computer Science (CS) educators teaching CS courses involving global collaboration. The challenges and solutions in conducting global software engineering courses will be addressed. While there is a rich source of literature covering this topic, there is limited consolidated guidance available for CS educators wishing to implement a global course, in collaboration with other institutions. So building upon the existing knowledge in the literature in the area will help to produce a report that will serve as a broad ranging resource for global software engineering educators. The SLR focusses on two areas: 1. Learning GSE Theory: Developing courses based on GSE theory. I.e. How to teach students about developing software across multi-site teams (to include things like cultural training – i.e. how to build trust amongst a team that hasn’t met face to face, etc.). AND 2. Learning GSE by doing: Developing courses that show how to apply GSE methods in the classroom. E.g. where students develop software in multi-site teams (where the software developed is not really the focus, but ‘how’ to develop the software is what we would be looking at). We also include studies that take a hybrid approach by including a combination of theory and practice. I.e. research that presents experiences of running hybrid courses aimed at developing student capabilities in working as global professionals which have varying degrees of cross-site collaboration, and theorypractice balance.

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  • The Hurunui Waiau Zone Implementation Programme as a collaborative planning process: A preliminary review

    Memon, A.; Duncan, R.; Spicer, A.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The objective of this report is to provide a preliminary assessment of the development of the Hurunui Waiau Zone Implementation Programme as a collaborative planning exercise to progress the implementation of the Canterbury Water Management Strategy (CWMS) in the Hurunui Waiau catchments. This report builds on an earlier study (Lomax, Memon and Painter, 2010) on the development of the CWMS as an innovative collaborative regional strategy to address exacerbating conflicts over the allocation and management of freshwater resources in the Canterbury region in New Zealand. Past attempts to satisfactorily address these concerns within the framework of the Resource Management Act 1991 statutory planning regime have encountered significant barriers. The formulation and implementation of the CWMS is expected to overcome these barriers by having adopted a collaborative governance model. This report reflects upon and presents observations of the Hurunui Waiau Zone Implementation Programme process. As such, it flags for the Canterbury Regional Council a number of issues which have emerged from this valuable learning experience and concludes with a number of questions drawn from our observations for consideration by the CRC with zone committees and other stakeholder groups and recommendations for research.

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  • Deer carcass breakdown monitoring

    Ross, J. G.; McCoskery, H.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This research project monitored 1080 residue breakdown in muscle, skin, bone and stomach samples for two sika deer (Cervus nippon) carcasses during the period October 2010 to May 2011. These deer were located immediately following a possum control operation undertaken on the 23/10/2010 using aerially-delivered 1080 bait.

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  • Conservation and biology of the rediscovered nationally endangered Canterbury knobbled weevil, Hadramphus tuberculatus

    Iles, J.; Bowie, M. H.; Johns, P.; Chinn, W.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    Three areas near Burkes Pass Scenic Reserve were surveyed for the presence of Hadramphus tuberculatus, a recently rediscovered endangered weevil. The reserve itself was resurveyed to expand on a 2005/2006 survey. Non-lethal pitfall traps and mark and recapture methods were used. Six H. tuberculatus were caught in pitfall traps over 800 trap nights. Day and night searching of Aciphylla aurea was conducted. Four specimens were observed on Aciphylla flowers between 9 am and 1.30 pm within the reserve. No specimens were found outside of the reserve by either method. Other possible locations where H. tuberculatus may be found were identified and some visited. At most locations Aciphylla had already finished flowering, no H. tuberculatus were found. Presence of H. tuberculatus at other sites would be best determined by searching of Aciphylla flowers during the morning from late October onwards.

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  • Establishing a baseline: Ecological monitoring for Panama Rock and Stones remnant, Le Bons Bay, Banks Peninsula

    Bowie, M. H.; Smith, M.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The eastern side of Banks Peninsula was created by eruptions and subsequent erosion of the Akaroa volcano which was active between 9 and 8 million years ago. Banks Peninsula was completely forested but due to human settlement approximately one percent of the forested area was left by the early 1900s. This large-scale removal of forest and the introduction of exotic mammals created a mass extinction of New Zealand’s native biota. The present day landscape is a mixture of bush occupying gullies which either escaped clearance or have regenerated due to more ideal moisture conditions and less disturbance from farming stock. The forested areas consist of either kanuka canopy or a mixed canopy of Fuchsia, mahoe, fivefinger, lemonwood, lacebark, ribbonwood, pigeonwood, kowhai and kaikomako. Within the eastern side of Banks Peninsula, inland from Le Bons Bay, is an area called Panama Rock, also known as Keller’s Peak. This peak is a trachyte dome with a feeder dike trending away south westwards. An invertebrate study on 19 covenant and reserves on eastern Banks Peninsula found that the Panama Rock remnant had high diversity compared to the others. The Panama Rock remnant was bought by the Joseph Langer Trust to conserve the native flora and fauna of the area and to make it available for the public to enjoy. This research aims to identify the native and pest fauna of the area. Monitoring will assist with management decisions by identifying: which native species are present, species in need of conservation, and exotic pests that need to be eradicated. Baseline surveys will allow the Trust to compare with future years and be able to gauge if their management actions are working. If the Trust is planning to trap introduced mammals at Panama Rock and/or the Stones remnant, monitoring will help to determine whether trapping is helping the native biodiversity.

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  • The Te Hoe Shore Whaling Station Artefact Assemblage

    Harris, Jaden; Smith, Ian (2005-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report presents an analysis of the Te Hoe Shore Whaling Station artefact assemblage, exclusive of faunal remains, wood and charcoal. The Te Hoe site, located on the East Coast of the North Island of New Zealand, was excavated in January/February 2005 as part of a larger project investigating early European communities in New Zealand. Shore whaling was a prominent extractive industry in New Zealand in the 1830s and 1840s and in many areas whalers were the first European settlers to arrive in this country. The primary aim in documenting their material culture is to get a more detailed picture of how whalers adapted to life in New Zealand, and to understand what influences if any they had on the subsequent development of European settlement. To this end the present paper attempts to give detailed descriptive analysis of the artefacts and place them within both a spatial and temporal context.

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  • Artefacts from the Oashore Shore Whaling Station

    Harris, Jaden; Smith, Ian (2005-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report presents an analysis of the artefactual assemblage from the Oashore whaling station and is largely a revision of a work originally submitted as a Masters Thesis (Harris 2005). Shore whaling was a brutally efficient industry for a short period in the 1830s and 1840s and represents some of the earliest European settlement in New Zealand. The excavation of the Oashore whaling station, located on Banks Peninsula, South Island of New Zealand, in January/February 2004 represents the first part of a major research orientated project on shore whaling in New Zealand. The present paper aims to document the range of material culture available to the Oashore whalers to help shed some light on what life was like for a shore whaler and to investigate how these communities compare or contrast with other contemporaneous European sites. To this end the Oashore artefactual material, exclusive of faunal remains and charcoal or wood, has been described, quantified, and dated where possible.

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  • Excavations at the Oashore Whaling Station: (M37/162) Banks Peninsula January–February 2004

    Smith, Ian; Prickett, Nigel (2006)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • Excavations at Te Hoe Mahia Peninsula

    Smith, Ian; Prickett, Nigel (2008-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • Meat Weight, Nutritional and Energy Yield Values for New Zealand Archaeofauna

    Smith, Ian (2011-01)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • Codfish Island/Whenua Hou Archaeological Project: Preliminary Report

    Smith, Ian; Anderson, Atholl (2007-08)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • Data for an Archaeozoological Analysis of Marine Resource Use in Two New Zealand Study Areas (Revised edition)

    Smith, Ian; James-Lee, Tiffany (2010-12)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Dunedin Energy Baseline Study

    Gabriel, Cle-Anne; Stephenson, Janet; Carrington, Gerry (2015-09)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Copyright The Authors

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  • Fishing activity in the Waikato and Waipa rivers

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Allan, Dave G.; Kilgour, Jonathan T.; Watene-Rawiri, Erina M.; Stichbury, Glen; Walsh, Cameron (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this research project is to collate information regarding the recent use of fisheries resources in the Waikato River and Waipa River catchment areas. In particular, the project sought to summarise the commercial, customary, and recreational fishing activity in the catchments of the Waikato and Waipa rivers in the spatial context of recently introduced co-governance areas. These fisheries include, but are not exclusive to, the broad range of aquatic life managed under the Fisheries Act 1996. Such information is required to support management which includes a co-management framework. The research describes the commercial, customary and recreational fisheries including species and quantities taken, fishing methods, and seasonal influences.

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  • Barrett Bush management plan

    Bryan, Catherine Louise (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The current vegetation pattern of Barrett Bush is the result of complex landscape changes of both recent and historic times. The most recent natural landscape changes occurred as the Waikato River meandered across the region, changing course over many years and depositing the alluvial plain that Barrett Bush grows on. More recent landscape changes have been the result of human activity as vegetation clearance and agricultural development has occurred throughout the district. Fortunately, Barrett Bush was set aside and the reserve now provides insight into original vegetation patterns as well as a refuge for biota characteristic of forests dominated by kahikatea. Barrett Bush sits a shallow depression of an alluvial plain with a podocarp vegetation composition that is classed as a kahikatea semi-swamp forest (Clarkson et al. 2007). Clarkson et al. (2007) describe the typical natural vegetation of kahikatea semi-swamp forest: “Semi-swamp forest dominated by kahikatea grew on the poorly drained shallow depressions. Several other species were present in varying amounts, including rimu, matai, pukatea, swamp maire, tawa, pokaka, and occasional cabbage tree. Prominent in the understorey were silver fern, mapou, hangehange, Coprosma areolata, and turepo, and sedges including Hymenophyllum demissum, hen and chicken fern, Astelia fragrans, A. grandis, and Microlaena avenacea.”

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  • Lake Rotokakahi water quality update 1990-2011

    Butterworth, Joseph (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Rotokakahi is an Iwi-owned lake administered by the Lake Rotokakahi Board of Control on Behalf of lake owners who are descendants from the Ngāti Tumatawera and Tūhourangi hapū of Te Arawa. It is mesotrophic (moderate water quality) lake with an area of 4.4 km² comprised of exotic forestry (57.1%), pasture (26.3%) and regenerating indigenous forest/scrub (16.6%).

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