2,421 results for Report

  • Lake Rotokakahi water quality update 1990-2011

    Butterworth, Joseph (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Rotokakahi is an Iwi-owned lake administered by the Lake Rotokakahi Board of Control on Behalf of lake owners who are descendants from the Ngāti Tumatawera and Tūhourangi hapū of Te Arawa. It is mesotrophic (moderate water quality) lake with an area of 4.4 km² comprised of exotic forestry (57.1%), pasture (26.3%) and regenerating indigenous forest/scrub (16.6%).

    View record details
  • Life-history of Lake Horowhenua common smelt: analysis of otolith chemistry and vertebral counts

    Tana, Raymond; Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Horowhenua is a coastal eutrophic lake on the west coast of the North Island. A recent survey of the lake found lower than expected fish diversity but comparatively abundant native fish populations, comprising mostly shortfin and longfin eels (Anguilla australis and A. dieffenbachii). A weir on the outlet of the lake was ifentified as a potential barrier to fish migrations, reducing fish diversity and abundance in the lake. However, large numbers of common smelt (Retropinna retropinna) were collected during this survey, indicating that the population was eighter successfully reproducing in the lake or diadromous, i.e., migrating from the sea. Previous studies have shown that lacustrine common smelt can be distinguished from diadromous populations by differences in counts of vertebrae and gill rakers, and otolith microchemistry. Horizons Regional Council requested that an analysis of smelt otoliths and relevant morphological characteristics be performed to ascertain if the Lake Horowhenua population was diadromous.

    View record details
  • Assessment of fish populations in Lake Horowhenua, Levin

    Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Horowhenua (Waipunahau) is of substantial historical, cultural and recreational value to the people of the Horowhenua region. However, water quality and biodiversity within the lake has been in decline for a number of years. As part of lake restoration efforts by Horizons Regional Council and the Lake Horowhenua Trustees, a survey of fish species in Lake Horowhenua was conducted by the University of Waikato using boat electrofishing and fyke netting. A lake restoration plan had previously identified invasive fish species such as koi carp (Cyprinus carpio) and European perch (Perca fluviatilis) as being potential barriers to rehabilitation of the lake. The purpose of this survey was to determine the abundance and diversity of fish species within the lake and to ascertain if pest fish species were present at biomasses high enough to be negatively impacting on lake ecology. Recommendations would then be made as to the potential methods and necessity for pest fish removal.

    View record details
  • Fish biomass and gonad development in the Rotopiko (Serpentine) lakes.

    Wu, Nicholas; Daniel, Adam Joshua; Tempero, Grant Wayne

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The Rotopiko (Serpentine) lake complex is one of the Waikato region’s few peat lake systems that contains primarily native aquatic plants. Retaining the natural state of the lakes has been considered a high priority by the Department of Conservation (DOC) and extensive efforts have taken place to prevent nutrient leaching and to control invasive organisms in the lakes. The University of Waikato was contracted to investigate the biomass of introduced and native fish in the Rotopiko lakes in order to determine if the fish removal with rotenone, a chemical piscicide, was required as proposed by DOC. Fish were collected using a variety of traps and nets prior to making and release. Following a dispersal period, each lake was then fished a second time and fish biomass was estimated using a capture-mark-release-recapture study design; population estimates were derived using the Lincoln-Petersen method (Nichols 1992).

    View record details
  • Preliminary analysis of boat electrofishing in the Waikato River in the vicinity of the Huntly Power Station: Part 1 - fishing on 2 September 2013

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report gives a basic summary of the first sampling of a three-part monitoring project for Genesis Power Ltd (Genesis) that the University of Waikato is undertaking in close collaboration with National Institute of Water and Environmental Research Institute Atmosphere Ltd (NIWA), Hamilton, Boat electrofishing results will eventually be combined with netting undertaken by NIWA in a final report to Genesis. The boat electrofishing survey took place on 2 September, the objective of which was to undertake the first of three surveys to estimate fish distributions and abundances over key seasons: 1. Early spring 2013 (end August/early September) to target peak trout abundances and cyprinid distributions during cooler months of the year. 2. Summer 2014 (Jan/February) to capture peak summer abundances for target indigenous and exotic species. 3. Winter 2014 (June/July) to target mullet and cyprinid distributions during cooler months of the year. At the surveyed reach is about 80 km from the sea, and at this point the Waikato River is a 7th order river with at a bed elevation of about 19.1 m above sea level. The catchment area upstream is 12,188 km², and the river has a mean flow of 352.3 m³ s⁻¹ and a mean annual low flow of 123.5 m³ s⁻¹ (Freshwater Fish Database Assistant version 6.1, I.G. Jowett).

    View record details
  • Te Raupatu o Tauranga Moana = The confiscation of Tauranga lands. [Volume 1]

    Stokes, Evelyn (1990)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A report providing a historical and geographical overview on the confiscation of Tauranga lands. In two volumes, volume one comprises a narrative of the events described as the raupatu, the confiscation of lands in the Tauranga Moana tribal area under the New Zealand Settlements Act 1863. Volume two is a collection of documents, edited and annotated which were compiled in support of the report. These documents include personal accounts, tribal history, land purchases, lands returned and crown transactions.

    View record details
  • Te Raupatu o Tauranga Moana : Volume 2, Documents relating to tribal history, confiscation and reallocation of Tauranga lands.

    Stokes, Evelyn (1993)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    A report providing a historical and geographical overview on the confiscation of Tauranga lands. In two volumes, volume one comprises a narrative of the events described as the raupatu, the confiscation of lands in the Tauranga Moana tribal area under the New Zealand Settlements Act 1863. Volume two is a collection of documents, edited and annotated which were compiled in support of the report. These documents include personal accounts, tribal history, land purchases, lands returned and crown transactions.

    View record details
  • Debriefing following seclusion and restraint: a summary of relevant literature

    Sutton, D; Webster, S; Wilson, M

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This report provides a summary of current debriefing practices that have been shown to support strategy six in the Six Core Strategies© and supports seclusion or restraint reduction programmes, drawn from a review or relevant literature. The document provides a foundation for services to develop or modify current debriefing practices in line with evidence-informed guidelines.

    View record details
  • Research, Analysis and Insight into National Standards (RAINS) Project. Second Report: Understanding New Zealand’s Very Local National Standards

    Thrupp, Martin (2013-04)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This is the second report of the Research, Analysis and Insight into National Standards (RAINS) project, a three-year study of the introduction of National Standards into New Zealand primary and intermediate schools.

    View record details
  • Research, Analysis and Insight into National Standards (RAINS) Project Final Report: National Standards and the Damage Done

    Thrupp, Martin; White, Michelle (2013-11)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This is the final report of the Research Analysis and Insight into National Standards (RAINS) project, a three-year study of the enactment of the National Standards policy in six diverse primary and intermediate schools. This report provides an overview discussion of the pros and cons of the National Standards policy as experienced by staff, children and parents in the RAINS schools. It summarises the policy and methodological background to the research and the findings of the two previous RAINS reports. The report is also being accompanied by online case studies and other data files.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Counties Manukau (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Capital and Coast DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Canterbury and the West Coast (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Hawke's Bay (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Hutt Valley DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Midcentral DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Lakes DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Southern DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Taranaki (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in Whanganui DHB (2010)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2010-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report reviews a range of routinely collected data on children and young people in the DHB, with a view to identifying the numbers of children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities accessing health services within the region. In addition, given a trend towards deinstitutionalisation and a greater emphasis on community care, this year‟s in-depth topics consider common areas of unmet need for families caring for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities, as well as the impact health and disability support services may have on their wellbeing. This report provides an overview of secondary health service utilisation for children and young people with chronic conditions and disabilities in the DHB. While the data presented is at times imperfect, and at best only provides a glimpse of the health needs of these children and young people, the current paucity of data should not preclude the DHB reviewing the disability support services available locally, with a view to considering whether any of the issues identified nationally are an issue within the region. Further, while high quality evidence (e.g. from randomised control trials) is lacking, there is nevertheless sufficient information to direct future initiatives towards the areas of greatest need, which potentially may include access to respite care, continuity and coordination between services, and the adequate resourcing of caregivers (both paid and informal) looking after children and young people with disabilities. Attention to ongoing quality improvement in these areas will ensure that over time, the health sector is better able to respond to the needs of these children and young people, who are amongst some of the most vulnerable in New Zealand.

    View record details