4,185 results for Report

  • Using quantitative analytical techniques when researching real estate – applied example

    Garner, Gary

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The acquisition of live data through case study analysis and subsequent application of econometric modelling techniques can often prove effective in the pursuit to explain trends in real estate values, despite characteristically limited availability of data sets (observations) especially in the case of larger property developments. Both linear and non-linear (polynomial and other forms) regression analysis techniques are typically utilised for this purpose. Such regression models describe and evaluate the relationship between a dependant variable , and other variables (independent variables).

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  • Super City? State of Auckland report

    Neill, CM; Crothers, C; McGregor, J; Hanna, K; Fletcher, M; Wilson, D (2013-12-12)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Auckland is New Zealand’s bold experiment in local government. Is the Super City a success, a disappointment or something in between? The local government elections in 2013 provide an opportunity to assess the state of Auckland. How is New Zealand’s largest city measuring up three years on from the unique governance reforms that created it? This report examines various areas of living in Auckland; its people and communities, democratic participation, the economy, the state of the built and natural environment, transport and other infrastructure, public services, confidence in Auckland’s regional and local governance and value for money. It aims to help citizens make informed decisions when they vote in the 2013 local government elections. It also allows them to be involved in a continuing research project that assesses the city they live in.

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  • Strengthening engagements between schools and the science community

    Gilbert, J; Bolstad, R; Bull, A; Carson, S; MacIntyre, W; Spiller, L (2013-12-05)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This research aimed to generate evidence-based recommendations for strengthening partnerships between schools and the science community to support students’ science learning and engagement. It was underpinned by a future-oriented perspective, framed by larger questions about the purpose of science education in the context of a rapidly changing 21st-century world. The report digs beneath assumptions about why learners’ and teachers’ engagement with the science community is considered important, and examines what kinds of approaches and supports might sustain future-oriented science education for New Zealand learners.

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  • The Internet in New Zealand 2013

    Gibson, A; Miller, M; Smith, P; Bell, A; Crothers, C (2013-12-16)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Executive Summary The fourth survey of the World Internet Project New Zealand (WIPNZ) was conducted between late July and early September 2013. For the first time, the sample in 2013 used both telephone and internet surveys. This report presents an analysis of the usage of and attitudes to the internet of the resulting sample of 2006 New Zealanders. As internet use approaches saturation in New Zealand, our focus turns from ‘how many people use the internet?’ to ‘how do people use the internet?’ and ‘why do some not use the internet at all?’ To answer these questions, the sample has been divided into five categories: never-users (5% of sample), ex-users (3%), low level users (14%), first generation users (40%) and next generation users (38%). Usage For a large number of people the internet is used daily. Four out of five spend an hour or more online at home every day. Almost everyone under 40 is online, so that only 1% of our under-40 sample are non-users. Accessing the internet ‘on the go’ is prevalent. Seven out of ten users access the internet from a hand-held mobile device such as a smartphone or an iPad. Almost half of the internet users surveyed (48%) said that they had accessed the internet through a tablet, while an even higher proportion (68%) connected through their mobile phone in the past year. Activities Most internet users say they surf or browse the web (96%) or visit social networking sites (81%). 34% of internet users report that they use the cloud, 41% purchase apps and almost two thirds (65%) download free apps. Most users check their email daily (89%). Just over 60% of men aged 30–44 said they have looked at sites with sexual content. Māori and Pasifika internet users, especially those in lower income households, take the lead in subscriptions to music streaming services like Spotify. More than one in five Māori (21%) and Pasifika (23%) users in households with annual incomes of less than $50,000 have paid for a subscription to a music streaming service in the past year. The internet is used as a tool for consumer decision making, with 94% of users looking for information about products online – more than half of users do this at least weekly. For 85% of users, this kind of online research includes comparing prices. Almost half of our users (47%) have logged in to secure areas on Government or Council websites, and 51% have paid taxes, fines or licences online in the past year. Comparing the importance of media Comparing the importance of various forms of media as information sources, 81% of all our respondents rated the internet (including online media such as streamed radio) as important or very important. This was very much higher than the proportion who rated offline media as important: television (47%), radio (37%) and newspapers (37%). One of the most dramatic differences according to age group is the importance of the internet as a source of entertainment and leisure. While watching (offline) television is an important leisure activity for people across all ages, using the internet as a form of entertainment is a young-person phenomenon: 80% of respondents aged 16–29 rate it as important or very important. This 2013 survey has a different sample structure than previous years in order to include New Zealanders without a landline. The questionnaire has also undergone substantial updating to keep pace with changing digital technologies. For these reasons, the present report focuses solely on the findings for 2013, and longitudinal analyses will be presented in a subsequent report next year.

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  • Comment on: Cross-border portfolios: assets, liabilities and wealth transfers

    Berka, Martin (2015-10)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • National Health Emergency Plan: A framework for the health and disability sector

    Johal, SS; MacDonald, C; Mitchell, J (2015-10-15)

    Report
    Massey University

    This edition of the National Health Emergency Plan has been revised and updated to reflect current thinking on the health aspects of emergency management in New Zealand and internationally. It reflects the sophistication of a second-generation, risk-based plan developed by emergency management specialists under the leadership of the Joint Centre for Disaster Research in partnership with the Ministry of Health. The plan was developed in consultation with local and international specialists in the field of emergency management, emergency managers and planners in the health and disability sector, and other key stakeholders. A collaborative, consultative approach has been taken throughout the development of the plan, including holding workshops with health emergency management stakeholders across the nation. Constant contact has been maintained with the concurrent review of the National Civil Defence Emergency Management Plan Order 2015 (National CDEM Plan) to ensure consistency between the two plans. In acknowledgement of the importance of evidence-based policy and practice, an extensive international literature review formed the basis for much of the plan’s content. To maintain its alignment with the National CDEM Plan, the National Health Emergency Plan will be reviewed by the Ministry of Health within five years of its adoption. The plan will also be reviewed and updated as required following any new developments or substantial changes to the operations or organisation of New Zealand health and disability services, as a result of lessons from a significant emergency affecting the health of communities or the health and disability sector itself, if new hazards and risks are identified, or by direction of the Minister of Health or Director-General of Health. Annexes at the back of the plan are intended to provide a short document format that can be rapidly updated with new or revised guidance on specific issues as they are identified. The Ministry of Health welcomes submissions of good practice that can be incorporated into future editions.

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  • Enhancing financial and economic yield in tourism: yield associated with different tourist types

    Becken, Susanne; Lennox, J.; Fitt, Helen M.; Butcher, G.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The programme “Enhancing Financial and Economic Yield in Tourism” has completed a range of investigations into various dimensions of private sector yield of tourism businesses, as well as public sector yield of tourism at local and national levels. Results from the earlier studies raised the question whether different types of tourists would differ with respect to their yield generated in the private sector and their costs posed to the public sector. Yield in this report is understood as net benefit – financial, economic, environmental or social. For the private sector yield, the measures of Value Added, Free Financial Cash Flow and Economic Value Added will be used, and for public sector yield the ratios between costs and revenue will be derived as a yield measure. The research objectives were to: 1. Understand tourist activity patterns in relation to impacts on the private and public sectors; 2. Derive yields for different types of visitors; and 3. Assess visitor satisfaction as one aspect of (social) yield.

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  • Managerial factors in primary production: data from a sample of New Zealand farmers with an emphasis on experience as a factor in success

    Nuthall, Peter L.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This report presents the data collected from a postal survey of a wide ranging sample of all types of New Zealand farmers. The survey schedule was designed to collect information enabling models to be developed explaining the variables giving rise to a farmer’s managerial ability, and to determine and explore farmers’ Locus of Control and its relationship to a farmer’s managerial ability. The detailed results of these studies have been published elsewhere (see the reference list), but these research articles do not present the full details of the data collected. This report was prepared to ensure these details are available for researchers who choose to further explore these and other issues. The survey was conducted in late 2006 and achieved a very satisfactory 41 per cent response rate from the stratified sample of 2300 farmers. The data collected included both farm and, especially, farmer data covering both personal information (age, education and the like) and farm management and skill information. Question sets to discover the farmer’s management style (personality), locus of control, objectives, self rated intelligence, managerial ability, cash surplus, asset value changes, physical output, experience both as a young person, and as a farmer, and information on a farmer’s forebears were all included. The data was analysed in various ways including producing distributions by farm type and other categories. Factor analyses were also carried out to isolate some of the basic factors explaining farmers’ personal features (objectives, managerial style….). The results, and the important conclusions, are all presented. Various regression equations were explored in explaining managerial ability. It was clear that experience was an important contributor to ability, particularly a farmer’s early life experiences. Aspects of a farmer’s managerial style (personality) also proved to be important as well as aspects of the farmer’s objectives. These results are important for directing efforts to improve the general level of ability in the nation’s farm managers. Improvement of, say, 5 per cent would have a marked impact on the efficiency of resource use and the nation’s wealth.

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  • Impacts of oil prices on New Zealand tourism : an economic framework

    Becken, Susanne; Nguyen, M.; Schiff, A.

    Report
    Lincoln University

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  • Further sensitivity analysis of simple evolving connectionist systems applied to the Lincoln aphid data set

    Watts, Michael J.; Worner, Susan P.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This report presents two further experiments over the Aphid data set. The first is a more detailed investigation of the sensitivity of Simple Evolving Connectionist System (SECoS) networks to the exclusion of various combinations of inputs. This is in contrast to the previous work, where only the effect of excluding single variables was investigated. The second experiment investigates a hypothesis that attempts to explain the results found in the first experiment.

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  • Using multi-layer perceptrons to model the Lincoln aphid data set

    Watts, Michael J.; Worner, Susan P.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This document is the initial report on a systematic approach to the application of MLP to the aphid prediction problem. The aims of this initial work are three-fold; to investigate the effectiveness of a particular representation of the data, to identify the approximate optimal topology for MLP applied to this problem, and to identify the approximate optimal training parameters for MLP applied to this problem.

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  • Comparison of multi-layer perceptrons and simple evolving connectionist systems over the Lincoln aphid data set

    Watts, Michael J.; Worner, Susan P.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This report presents two further experiments over the aphid data set. The first is an evaluation of the adaptive abilities of backpropagation of errors trained MLP and a comparison of these capabilities with the Simple Evolving Connectionist System (SECoS). The goal of the first experiment is to compare both the performance and the adaptive abilities of the two models. The second experiment is an investigation of the sensitivity of the SECoS to the exclusion of various input variables. The goal of the second experiment is to determine which of the thirteen input variables contributes the most to the modelling of the problem, that is, which variable the network is most sensitive to.

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  • Computers and information management in Canterbury dairy farming

    Alvarez, Jorge; Nuthall, Peter L.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    For providing systems to support decision making it is important to understand how farmers collect and manage decision information. Using data from a mail survey a ""three-information-area"" and ""four-system-type"" model was tested to describe Canterbury dairy farmer's information management structure. Those using computerised systems in every area were the largest group, but representing only 12% of farmers. Farmers using computerised systems in different information areas show similar characteristics in contrast to non-users, such as having farmed less years, being younger, having larger herds and bigger farms, being more educated, spending more time doing office work, involving more both farm adviser and accountant time, and being more profit oriented. Those who own computers, but do not use computerised information systems, are not statistically different from those not owning computers. The use of computers for managing feed and pasture information seems to be more restricted than for finance and livestock. The relationships among farm management computer use and the farmer's characteristics were checked using single statistical tests, regression and cluster analyses. The research findings are relevant for those aiming to improve farmer information management and also for farm software developers.

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  • Computer use and attitudes for a sample of Canterbury, New Zealand dairy farmers

    Alvarez, Jorge; Nuthall, Peter L.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    With the objective of collecting data for assessing research hypotheses about information management, a mail survey was carried out on Canterbury dairy farmers between July and August of 2000. From a total of 537 questionnaires sent, 300 were received, resulting in 290 usable responses. This report describes the average farm, farm sizes, the manager's dairy farming experience and age, tenancy, education, management teams, non-family people giving a reasonable input into farm decision making, farm office equipment used, computer use, software utilisation, information sources, internet use, farmer goals, and farmer opinions about information management. While almost three quarters of the farmers own a computer, 61% are using computerised systems to manage farm information. Financial management was the most common use of computers with 54.48% of the farmers using them in this way, followed by the livestock area with 35.17%, while only 16.9% of the farmers were using software to support their feed management. Farmers using computerised systems were younger, more educated, and more profit oriented than non-users. This group managed bigger farms, they have been farming less time both in Canterbury and in total, and they also used farm advisers more extensively in their decision making, and they spent more time doing office work.

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  • Canterbury dairy farmers' opinions about using computerised farm information systems

    Alvarez, Jorge; Nuthall, Peter L.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    Canterbury dairy farmers' opinions about computerised systems used for managing farm information were collected through 39 stratified, randomly selected interviews. Farmers who are using software note they can save time, the software supports their farm management work, and it also enables them to use management approaches requiring more detailed information. Farmers who are not using computerised systems, but are considering this possibility, explain they are facing other priorities relative to improving their information systems. They are aware of the computer and software advantages, and they have a positive feeling towards computing technology. Some of them, however, feel insecure about their ability to use computers. Farmers not considering computerised systems believe computer technology is useless for their particular situations. Some farmers think computerised systems are unable to solve their actual farm problems, others feel themselves too old to learn the new technology. The interviews have confirmed ""earlier"" findings from a former mail survey. Key factors associated with the adoption of computer technology are farmer age, directly and through its relationship with farmer education; farmer education itself; the size of the herd; and consultant use intensity and involvement in farm management decision making.

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  • Factors affecting farmer adoption and use of computerised information systems : a case study of Florida, Uruguay, dairy farming

    Alvarez, Jorge; Nuthall, Peter L.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    With the objective of collecting data for assessing research hypotheses about information management, a survey was carried out on Florida, Uruguay dairy farmers between October and November of 2000. A total of 61 farmers were interviewed and asked to fill a survey questionnaire and three psychological test forms. While more than a quarter of the farmers own a computer, 17% are using computerised systems to manage farm information. Livestock management was the most common use of computers with 15% of the farmers using them in this way, followed by the finance area with 5%, while no farmers were using software to support their feed management. Farmers using computerised systems were more educated, and more "success in farming"" oriented than non-users. This group managed bigger farms, and they spent more time doing ofice work. Unwillingness to use computerised systems can be explained according to the farmer's computer technology alienation feelings (""knowledge gap""), incompatible information management skills, and poor economic benefit perceptions. The first two factors may reflect farmers' learning and problem solving styles being incompatible with computerised systems, which may originate from the interaction of basic personality traits and the educational and life process (family and community environment). Given certain learning and problem solving styles, farmers may form positive or negative economic benefit perceptions. The size of the farm, among other farm variables, clearly influences this perception through both the economies of scale of software use, and the scale of the management work. The lack of (computer) operational skills can delay sofiare adoption, but can be removed through training if the above factors support a positive attitude toward computerised system use. If feasible, actions promoting information technology change should focus on building farmer information management skills, and in making available knowledge relevant to developing positive economic benefit perceptions, assuming they exist. Advisors can play a significant role in this process. An additional strategy, particularly where non-users not considering the use of computerised systems represent important segments in the farming community, is the development of information management tools more compatible with these farmers' current information systems.

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  • How to write a research proposal : guidelines for Lincoln University students preparing for postgraduate research

    Fairweather, John R.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The present document has been developed with input from the following people (in order of their contribution): Dr Harvey Perkins, Human Sciences, Professor Steve Wratten, Soil, Plant and Ecological Sciences, Dr Bruce Curtis, AERU, Dr David McNeil, Soil, Plant and Ecological Science, Bob Gidlow, Human Sciences.

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  • Carbon capture and storage: Designing the legal and regulatory framework for New Zealand

    Barton, Barry; Jordan, Kimberley Jane; Severinsen, Greg (2013-09)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this Report is to identify the best possible legal framework for carbon capture and storage (CCS) in New Zealand. The Report is of a study funded by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment under research contract UOWX1204. The aim of the research was to provide a comprehensive framework for the development of law and policy to govern CCS in New Zealand. The methodology involved an analysis of the existing law and policy as it applies to CCS, assessment of any barriers, and a comparison with law in selected other jurisdictions. That analysis was followed by discussion of different policy options and evaluation of the possibility of addressing CCS in the existing legal framework. Recommendations were made for law reform on each aspect of the subject. The Report is concerned with the legal framework for geological storage or sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO₂). It does not address biosequestration, where CO₂ is accumulated, temporarily or permanently, in forests or other vegetation. Nor is it concerned with the sequestration of CO₂ in oceans, or with climate engineering.

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  • E koekoe te tūī, e ketekete te kākā, e kūkū te kererū: Indigenous methods of naming native and introduced bird species of Aotearoa

    Whaanga, Hēmi; Scofield, Paul; Raharuhi, Urukeiha; Green, Lynda; Matamua, Rangi; Temara, Pou; Roa, Tom (2015)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Naming in Māori society is a relationship of mana. It is a relationship formulated on establishing and reinforcing connections, identity, and place through whakapapa, between the person or group doing the naming and the thing being named. Māori have always named our world and therefore our realities. The overall goal of this Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga-funded extension of excellence project was to research and investigate indigenous methodologies of naming native and introduced bird species of Aotearoa and to develop a naming protocol for the naming of birds in Aotearoa/New Zealand. In addition to semi-structured interviews and a wānanga, reviews of scientific, archival and oral Māori resources, were undertaken.

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  • Women's career progression in Auckland law firms: views from the top, views from below

    Pringle, J; Giddings, L; Harris, C; Jaeger, S; Lin, S; Ravenswood, K; Ryan, I (2014-03-17)

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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