2,420 results for Report

  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the South Island (2013)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2013-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report collates a range of routinely collected data sources with a view to: 1. Estimating the prevalence of conditions arising in the perinatal period (e.g. preterm births, congenital and chromosomal anomalies) which may lead to greater health and disability support service demand during childhood and adolescence 2. Identifying the numbers of children and young people with specific chronic conditions and disabilities, who are accessing secondary healthcare services 3. Reviewing the distribution of overweight and obesity and its determinants (nutrition, physical activity) in children and young people In addition, two issues were selected for more in-depth review by participating DHBs at the beginning of the year, with one of these issues, the treatment of obesity in children and adolescents, being split onto two parts due to the large volume of literature in this area. This year’s in depth topics are thus: 1. The Determinants and Consequences of Overweight and Obesity 2. The Treatment of Obesity in Children and Adolescents Children of Parents with Mental Illness and Alcohol and Other Addictions (COPMIA) This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed by the NZ Child and Youth Epidemiology Service, with all of the indicators in the Chronic Conditions and Disabilities stream being updated in this year’s edition. These indicators have been grouped into four sections, as outlined below, with an in-depth topic on the children of parents with mental health issues and alcohol and other addictions (COPMIA) forming the fifth and final section. Section 1: Conditions Arising in the Perinatal Period Section 2: Other Disabilities Section 3: Chronic Medical Conditions Section 4: Obesity, Nutrition and Physical Activity Section 5: Children of Parents with Mental Illness and Alcohol and Other Addictions (COPMIA)

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Nelson Marlborough and South Canterbury (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Health of Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in the Southern District Health Board (2013)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2013-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report collates a range of routinely collected data sources with a view to: 1. Estimating the prevalence of conditions arising in the perinatal period (e.g. preterm births, congenital and chromosomal anomalies) which may lead to greater health and disability support service demand during childhood and adolescence 2. Identifying the numbers of children and young people with specific chronic conditions and disabilities, who are accessing secondary healthcare services 3. Reviewing the distribution of overweight and obesity and its determinants (nutrition, physical activity) in children and young people In addition, two issues were selected for more in-depth review by participating DHBs at the beginning of the year, with one of these issues, the treatment of obesity in children and adolescents, being split onto two parts due to the large volume of literature in this area. This year’s in depth topics are thus: 1. The Determinants and Consequences of Overweight and Obesity 2. The Treatment of Obesity in Children and Adolescents Children of Parents with Mental Illness and Alcohol and Other Addictions (COPMIA) This report is based on an Indicator Framework developed by the NZ Child and Youth Epidemiology Service, with all of the indicators in the Chronic Conditions and Disabilities stream being updated in this year’s edition. These indicators have been grouped into four sections, as outlined below, with an in-depth topic on the children of parents with mental health issues and alcohol and other addictions (COPMIA) forming the fifth and final section. Section 1: Conditions Arising in the Perinatal Period Section 2: Other Disabilities Section 3: Chronic Medical Conditions Section 4: Obesity, Nutrition and Physical Activity Section 5: Children of Parents with Mental Illness and Alcohol and Other Addictions (COPMIA)

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in MidCentral and Whanganui (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Canterbury and the West Coast (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Northern District Health Boards (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Hawke's Bay (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Midland Region (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Hutt Valley and Capital and Coast DHBs (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the Southern District Health Board (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in the South Island (2012)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Dell, Rebecca; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2012-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    In exploring the underling determinants of health for New Zealand’s children and young people, each of the indicators in this report has been assigned to one of four sections: 1. The Wider Macroeconomic and Policy Context: Indicators in this section consider the wider economic and policy environment and include gross domestic product (GDP), income inequality, child poverty and living standards, unemployment, children reliant on benefit recipients and young people reliant on benefits. 2. Socioeconomic and Cultural Determinants: This section is divided into two parts, with the first considering factors related to household composition, including children living in sole parent households, and household crowding. The second considers education as a determinant of health, with indicators including early childhood education, enrolments in kura kaupapa Māori, educational attainment at school leaving, senior secondary school retention, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions, and truancy and unjustified absences. 3. Risk and Protective Factors: This section is also divided into two parts, with the first considering issues relevant to the Well Child/Tamariki Ora Schedule, including immunisation coverage and the uptake of Well Child/Tamariki Ora contacts (via Plunket and B4 School Checks). The second part considers a range of issues associated with substance use, including smoking in pregnancy, exposure to secondhand cigarette smoke, smoking in young people, and alcohol-related harm. 4. Health Outcomes as Determinants: This section is divided into three parts, with the first considering hospital admissions and mortality from a range of socioeconomically sensitive conditions. The second part considers children and young people’s exposure to family violence and assault, with indicators including injuries arising from the assault, neglect or maltreatment of children, injuries arising from assault in young people, notifications to Child Youth and Family, and Police Family Violence investigations. Part three then reviews mental health issues, including children and young people’s access to mental health services and suicide and self-harm. The first of this year’s in-depth topics thus focuses on services and interventions to improve outcomes for women experiencing multiple adversities during pregnancy. The early years are also a crucial period of personal, social and emotional development, with the second of this year’s in-depth topics considering mental health issues in children.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Canterbury and the West Coast (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Nelson Marlborough and South Canterbury (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Midland Region (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hawke's Bay (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in MidCentral and Whanganui (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hutt Valley and Capital and Coast DHBS (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the South Island (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Otago and Southland (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Northern District Health Boards (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

    View record details