2,480 results for Report

  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Midland Region (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hawke's Bay (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in MidCentral and Whanganui (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hutt Valley and Capital and Coast DHBS (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the South Island (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Otago and Southland (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Northern District Health Boards (2011)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Oben, Glenda; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2011-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The aim of this report is to provide an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and to assist those working to improve child and youth health to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need. In this context, the role primary care plays in preventing a range of avoidable hospital admissions and mortality is crucial, with this year’s in depth topics focusing on the role of primary care in achieving health gains for children and young people. Specifically, the issues considered in this year’s in-depth topics are: 1. Models of Primary Care for Children. 2. Models of Primary Care for Young People. The indicators in this report have been assigned to one of the following three main sections: 1. Issues more common in infancy 2. Issues more common in children, or common in both children and your people 3. Issues more common in young people

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Waitemata DHB (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people.

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  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Whanganui DHB (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people.

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  • University of Otago Open Access Publishing Survey Results

    White, Richard; Remy, Melanie (2016-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • Blueskin People Power - a toolkit for community engagement.

    Willis, S; Stephenson, Janet; Day, R (2012)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Report Commissioned by Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hutt Valley, Capital & Coast and Wairarapa DHBs (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Canterbury and the West Coast (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections:  Issues in infancy  Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds  Conditions of the respiratory system  Common communicable diseases  Unintentional injury  Reproductive health  Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hawke’s Bay (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Nelson Marlborough and South Canterbury (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Southern DHB (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the South Island (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Midland Region (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in MidCentral and Whanganui (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Northern District Health Boards (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

    View record details