2,465 results for Report

  • The Determinants of Health for Children and Young People in Whanganui DHB (2009)

    Craig, Elizabeth; McDonald, Gabrielle; Reddington, Anne; Wicken, Andrew (2009-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The early years of life provide a crucial foundation for future health and wellbeing. The Determinants of Child and Youth Health in this DHB is the second report in a three part series on the health of children and young people in the region. It aims to provide an overview of the determinants shaping children and young people‟s lives during their crucial early years, and to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing the wellbeing of children and young people in the region. This report provides an overview of the key determinants of child and youth health in the DHB, and aims to assist the DHB consider some of the other agencies influencing child and youth wellbeing in the region. Such an intersectoral focus is necessary, as while addressing the large burden of avoidable morbidity and mortality highlighted in last year‟s report might at first seem a formidable task, collaborations with e.g. hous ing to improve the quality of housing stock may provide more tangible starting points. On a wider scale, while addressing broader issues such as child poverty may be beyond of the scope of the health sector alone, some of the coordinated intersectoral policy responses highlighted in this year‟s report, if implemented in New Zealand, would likely result in significant health gains for children and young people.

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  • University of Otago Open Access Publishing Survey Results

    White, Richard; Remy, Melanie (2016-11)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • Blueskin People Power - a toolkit for community engagement.

    Willis, S; Stephenson, Janet; Day, R (2012)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Report Commissioned by Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hutt Valley, Capital & Coast and Wairarapa DHBs (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Canterbury and the West Coast (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections:  Issues in infancy  Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds  Conditions of the respiratory system  Common communicable diseases  Unintentional injury  Reproductive health  Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Hawke’s Bay (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Nelson Marlborough and South Canterbury (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in Southern DHB (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the South Island (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Midland Region (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in MidCentral and Whanganui (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health Status of Children and Young People in the Northern District Health Boards (2015)

    Simpson, Jean; Duncanson, Mavis; Oben, Glenda; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Butchard, Michael; Pierson, Melanie; Lilley, Rebbecca; Gallagher, Sarah (2016-06)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report is based on an Indicator Framework1 developed in 2007 in which the indicators for each of the three reports in the series were identified. The indicators in this year’s report were developed from Craig et al’s indicators for the individual and whānau health and wellbeing stream. They are presented in the following sections: • Issues in infancy • Issues for all ages 0–24 year olds • Conditions of the respiratory system • Common communicable diseases • Unintentional injury • Reproductive health • Mental health Within each section, where possible, data are broken down by demographic factors such as age, gender, ethnicity, NZ Index of Deprivation decile, and district health board (DHB). When making comparisons between DHBs, readers should be aware that difference in disease rates may be the result of differences in DHB demographic characteristics (such as the age structure, ethnicity, and deprivation level of the population) and not assume that differences in disease rates represent differences in DHBs’ performance. In addition to providing an overview of a range of important health conditions affecting children and young people, this report also considers two issues as in-depth topics: Young people’s sexual and reproductive health by Dr Judith Adams, and Mental health issues in 15–24 year olds by Dr Michael Butchard. This report provides an overview of the health status of children and young people in New Zealand, and an entry point to the policy and evidence-based review literature, to assist with addressing child and youth health needs in a systematic and evidence-based manner. It is suggested that the Ministry of Health, DHBs and others working in the health sector use the epidemiological data in this report as a complement to knowledge of existing services and key stakeholders’ views. In addition, they should be mindful of existing Government policy, and that for any approaches developed to be effective, they need to be congruent with the evidence contained in the current literature. If there is no sound evidence base, planners should build an evaluation arm into their programmes to ensure the best use of available resources.

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  • The Health of Pacific Children and Young People with Chronic Conditions and Disabilities in New Zealand (2013)

    Craig, Elizabeth; Reddington, Anne; Adams, Judith; Dell, Rebecca; Jack, Susan; Oben, Glenda; Wicken, Andrew; Simpson, Jean (2016-08)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Pacific children and young people with disabilities and chronic conditions require a range of health and disability support services to reach their full potential, and it is undesirable that a paucity of data should preclude them featuring prominently in prioritisation, planning and resource allocation decisions. With these issues in mind, this report collates a range of routinely collected data sources with a view to: 1. Estimating the prevalence of conditions arising in the perinatal period (e.g. preterm births, congenital and chromosomal anomalies) which may lead to greater health and disability support service demand during childhood and adolescence 2. Identifying the numbers of Pacific children and young people with specific chronic conditions and disabilities, who are accessing secondary healthcare services 3. Reviewing the distribution of overweight and obesity and its determinants (nutrition, physical activity) in Pacific children and young people

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  • The Determinants of Health for Pacific Children and Young People in New Zealand (2014)

    Simpson, Jean; Oben, Glenda; Craig, Elizabeth; Adams, Judith; Wicken, Andrew; Duncanson, Mavis; Reddington, Anne (2016-08)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This report focuses on the underlying determinants of health for Pacific children and young people in New Zealand and aims to: 1. Provide a snapshot of progress for Pacific children in many of the areas covered by the House of Representatives’ Health Committee inquiry (2012) including: child poverty and living standards, housing, early childhood education, oral health, tobacco use, alcohol related harm, and children’s exposure to family violence. 2. Assist those working in the health sector to consider the roles other agencies play in influencing Pacific child and youth health outcomes in each of these areas. 3. Assist those working locally to utilise all of the available evidence when developing programmes and interventions to address child and youth health need.

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  • Science in the New Zealand Curriculum e-in-science

    Buntting, Catherine Michelle; MacIntyre, Bill; Falloon, Garry; Cosslett, Graeme; Forret, Michael (2012)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This milestone report explores some innovative possibilities for e-in-science practice to enhance teacher capability and increase student engagement and achievement. In particular, this report gives insights into how e-learning might be harnessed to help create a future-oriented science education programme. “Innovative” practices are considered to be those that integrate (or could integrate) digital technologies in science education in ways that are not yet commonplace. “Future-oriented education” refers to the type of education that students in the “knowledge age” are going to need. While it is not yet clear exactly what this type of education might look like, it is clear that it will be different from the current system. One framework used to differentiate between these kinds of education is the evolution of education from Education 1.0 to Education 2.0 and 3.0 (Keats & Schmidt, 2007). Education 1.0, like Web 1.0, is considered to be largely a one-way process. Students “get” knowledge from their teachers or other information sources. Education 2.0, as defined by Keats and Schmidt, happens when Web 2.0 technologies are used to enhance traditional approaches to education. New interactive media, such as blogs, social bookmarking, etc. are used, but the process of education itself does not differ significantly from Education 1.0. Education 3.0, by contrast, is characterised by rich, cross-institutional, cross-cultural educational opportunities. The learners themselves play a key role as creators of knowledge artefacts, and distinctions between artefacts, people and processes become blurred, as do distinctions of space and time. Across these three “generations”, the teacher’s role changes from one of knowledge source (Education 1.0) to guide and knowledge source (Education 2.0) to orchestrator of collaborative knowledge creation (Education 3.0). The nature of the learner’s participation in the learning also changes from being largely passive to becoming increasingly active: the learner co-creates resources and opportunities and has a strong sense of ownership of his or her own education. In addition, the participation by communities outside the traditional education system increases. Building from this framework, we offer our own “framework for future-oriented science education” (see Figure 1). In this framework, we present two continua: one reflects the nature of student participation (from minimal to transformative) and the other reflects the nature of community participation (also from minimal to transformative). Both continua stretch from minimal to transformative participation. Minimal participation reflects little or no input by the student/community into the direction of the learning—what is learned, how it is learned and how what is learned will be assessed. Transformative participation, in contrast, represents education where the student or community drives the direction of the learning, including making decisions about content, learning approaches and assessment.

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  • Matamata Piako District: Demographic Profile 1986 - 2031

    Jackson, Natalie; Pawar, Shefali (2013-03)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report outlines the demographic changes that have occurred in Matamata -Piako District, as well as what trends are expected in the future.

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  • Hawke's Bay Region: Demographic Profile 1986 - 2031

    Jackson, Natalie (2012-02)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report outlines the demographic changes that have occurred in Hawke's Bay Region, as well as what trends are expected in the future.

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  • Bay of Plenty Region and its Territorial Authorities: Demographic Profile 1986 - 2031

    Jackson, Natalie; Rarere, Moana; Pawar, Shefali (2013-12)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report outlines the demographic changes that have occurred in Bay of Plenty Region, as well as what trends are expected in the future.

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  • Interventions for a sustainable transport system for New Zealand: results from a Delphi study

    Spector, Sam; Stephenson, Janet; Hopkins, Debbie (2017-01)

    Report
    University of Otago

    A workstream of the Energy Cultures research programme, funded by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. energycultures.org

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  • Oscillation Revisited

    Beer, G; Cao, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    In previous work by Beer and Levi [8, 9], the authors studied the oscillation Ω(f, A) of a function f between metric spaces hX, di and hY, ρi at a nonempty subset A of X, defined so that when A = {x}, we get Ω(f, {x}) = ω(f, x), where ω(f, x) denotes the classical notion of oscillation of f at the point x ∈ X. The main purpose of this article is to formulate a general joint continuity result for (f, A) 7→ Ω(f, A) valid for continuous functions.

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