4,185 results for Report

  • Modelling of Charles Darwin earthquake reports as catastrophic wave phenomena

    Galiev, Shamil Usmanovich (2009)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    As it is the 200th anniversary of Darwin’s birth, 2009 has also been marked as 170 years since the publication of his book Journal of Researches, commonly referred to as The Voyage of the Beagle. During the voyage Darwin landed at Valdivia and Concepcion, Chile, just before, during and after a great earthquake which demolished hundreds of buildings, killing and injuring many people. It was a giant natural catastrophe. He saw the land rise before his eyes. Land was waved, lifted and cracked, volcanoes awoke and giant ocean waves attacked the coast. There are two main goals of this book. The first is emphasising the priority of Darwin in the description and the analysis of the results of the severe earthquakes (Chapter I). Extracts from Darwin’s Diary and Narrative 2 , ‘Journal of Researches’ and ‘The autobiography of Charles Darwin’ are presented. In the extracts Darwin described a few days of his work. Perhaps, those days were among the most important days of his life. We group the material of the extracts so that a reader can trace the evolution of Darwin’s thoughts. The key observations and ideas of Darwin, presented in the material, are shortly formulated. Then these ideas are analysed and compared with modern experimental and theoretical data. In particular, Darwin wrote ‘… the whole body of the sea retires from the coast, and then returns in great waves of overwhelming force...’, ‘ …Santa Maria was upheaved nine feet…’ (Santa Maria is the island), ‘… the displacement at first appears to be owing to a vorticose movement beneath each point thus affected;…’. Taking into account Darwin’ key ideas we construct the mathematical models of natural catastrophic phenomena. Chapter II is devoted to catastrophic ocean waves. The Lagrangian description is used. Highly nonlinear wave equations are derived, which describe the evolution of the waves propagating over a variable depth. An attention is focused on the transresonant evolution of periodic ocean waves, catastrophic waves and tsunami. An appearance of extreme waves is explained by resonant effects. The theory of uplift, loosening and rupture of weakly cohesive geomaterials, gassy soils and magma under sharp decompression within tension seismic waves is developed in Chapter III. In particular, our attention was attracted by Darwin’ words ‘… a severe earthquake, may, I think, be attributed to the disturbance of mud containing organic matter…’. Because of the global warming the mathematical description of properties of gassy liquids and soils becomes more and more timely. The last Chapter is devoted to Nonlinear Science problems, in particular, to the evolution of initially smooth wave motion into vortex motion, and turbulence. This evolution can take place in many layered systems: ground, ocean, air and plasma. The generation of elastica (mushroom)-like waves, surface drops and jets, vortices and turbulence is simulated by the same highly nonlinear wave equation. The transresonant evolution of highly nonlinear waves is studied. The transition to turbulence of these waves is modelled. It is emphasised that respectively simple nonlinear wave equations can describe wide spectre of catastrophic wave phenomena.

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  • A polymath anthropologist : essays in honour of Ann Chowning

    Gross, Claudia; Lyons, Harriet D.; Counts, Dorothy (2005)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    This volume honours Ann Chownings contributions to anthropology as a whole and to the anthropology of Melanesia in particular. It reflects the scope of her interests by bringing together a wide range of scholars and topics. A biographical narrative (by Judith Huntsman) of her life to date traces her career and there is a comprehensive bibliography of her works (Kathryn Creely). The essays deal primarily with issues in Oceania, except for two addressing one of her favourite pasttimes detective fiction, as a source of innovative word formation (Laurie Bauer) and its parallels to ethnography (Claudia Gross). Three archaeology essays discuss stone artefacts in Papua New Guinea (Pamela Swadling, Jim Specht, Susan Buhner), and one essay surveys dental morphology in Oceania (Daris R. Swindler). Essays in linguistics range from surveys of Oceanic plant names (Malcolm Ross), Proto Micronesian (Ward II. Goodcnough) and Proto Oceanic (Andrew Pawley) to detailed analyses of the languages of Tokelau (Robin Hooper) and Aneityum (John Lynch). The largest section consists of essays in socio-cultural anthropology, combining themes that have been the focus of Ann Chowning's work: marriage and social organisation, gender and sexuality, social and economic change, leadership, religion, myth and human-animal relations. These essays include a survey of anthropology in Oceania (Harriet D. and Andrew P. Lyons) and cover Polynesia (Phyllis Herda, Judith Huntsman, Penelope Schoeffel), New Zealand (Joan Metge, Julie Park), the Solomon Islands (Christine Dureau) and Papua New Guinea (John Barker, Mark Busse, Michael Monsell-Davis, Mark Mosko, Maev O'Collins, Marilyn Strathern). There are also essays recollecting Ann Chowning as a teacher, colleague and friend (Jane C. Goodale, Virginia Greene, Harriet D. Lyons, Luisa Margolies, James Urry, Michael W. Young).

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  • Social Ecology of New Technologies and Haemophilia in NZ — A Bleeding Nuisance revisited

    Park, Julie; York, Deon (2008)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    This research builds on previous studies conducted by the “Living with haemophilia” researchers over the past decade in New Zealand. The current study investigates the implications of new treatments, new technologies, and changes in health care for people and families with haemophilia and those who care for them, in the context of everyday living with haemophilia. The research design used semi-structured face-to-face interviews and/ or telephone interviews with 37 people, and participantobservation at a range of haemophilia gatherings. We asked people to share with us their perceptions and/ or experience of prenatal genetic diagnosis, preimplantation genetic diagnosis, gene therapy, and new treatments for hepatitis C, as well as their everyday experiences with haemophilia. The study design and the reasons we undertook it are described in the introduction. The first substantive section highlights the everyday issues of living with haemophilia as a bleeding disorder. The second discusses the organisational ecology of haemophilia. The third traverses issues concerning haemophilia as a genetic disorder, passed down the generations, and the final section explores the presence of hepatitis C in the haemophilia community. In the conclusions we note that there are still some difficulties around the timely diagnosis of haemophilia. However, treatment for many people has changed from on-demand to prophylaxis and from the provision of blood products to recombinant products. These technologies have had significant effects on perceptions of the seriousness of haemophilia, on the safety of products, on daily living, and on relationships with the treatment sources: from products made from donations, to those manufactured by multinational pharmaceutical companies. There was a high level of awareness of the costs of treatment, compared to the earlier studies. The formation of a National Haemophilia Management Group, which was a result of years of work between the Haemophilia Foundation of New Zealand (HFNZ), medical experts, and Ministry of Health officials, was a very welcome development in 2006. The HFNZ continues play an important part in many people’s lives. Despite a continuing emphasis on women as carriers, there is a greater realisation that men, too, pass on haemophilia, and that women can suffer from bleeding problems. Parents were exercised by the timing of when to tell their daughters about their carrier status, but carrier testing very seldom incurs the long delays of earlier years. Issues around carrying haemophilia on and reproductive choice are handled with great care in this community. A wide range of views were encountered, tempered by respect for the positions of others. Discussion of gene therapy was a little passé in this community, as it had been on an ever-moving horizon for many years, and because new alternative treatments were seemingly offering considerable benefits. However, gene therapy was not dismissed as a future possibility. Hepatitis C has had important effects on this community and on the individuals within it: effectively there is a hep C generation and a post-hep C generation. It was heartening that those undergoing the most recent form of treatment appeared to be experiencing better outcomes, although the treatment itself was gruelling. At the end of this research period, a Government announcement of acknowledgement, compensation and treatment was made, fulfilling a decade and a half of struggle for recognition of harm.

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  • Consuming identity : modernity and tourism in New Zealand

    Taylor, John Patrick (1998)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    What do visitors to New Zealand seek to gain from their travels, and in what ways are such expectations shaped? This work assesses the relationship between tourism-related discourse and identity, and ideas about distance and difference, by exploring aspects in the promotion and production of tourism products in New Zealand. Travellers to New Zealand often seek the "unspoilt" in nature, that which represents a beauty and "authenticity" seen to be lacking "at home". Likewise, infused with ideas regarding "ethnicity" and the traditional (as well as residual notions of the primitive or noble savage), images of Maaori in tourism are situated in relation to the "modern" tourist's self. For many travellers to New Zealand, alongside physical travel with its timetables and ticket stubs is a parallel symbolic journey through Time. Reversing Western narratives of progress and the Fall, the travellers' quest is to "unwind" the coils of technological - and often "intellectual" - Time. This work traces the fundamental ideological components of this world-view from the colonial period through to present-day tourism. What emerged in the early period of tourism development was the production and propagation of a pseudo-knowledge surrounding New Zealand's natural heritage and Maaori population. Although the last century has seen changes in styles of tourism, promotion, production, travel and tourist behaviour, it is argued that this prevailing system of representation continues to influence tourist perceptions of New Zealand and Maaori in negative ways. The ideas put forward by colonial writers concerning Otherness in nature and culture have remained as essential features of present tourism discourse. These have taken concrete form in a range of tourism related products which tend to promote a specifically modernist perception of place. Such works not only provide potential tourists with practical information about New Zealand as a holiday destination, but they also circulate within wider discursive fields that seek to legitimate ideological projects and further their cause.

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  • Oceanic music encounters : the print resource and the human resource : essays in honour of Mervyn McLean

    Moyle, Richard (editor) (2007)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    Mervyn Evan McLean, teacher, mentor, researcher and archivist, is the worthy recipient of this set of essays. Oceanic Music Encounters - the Print Resource ano" the Human Resource. The authors include colleagues and former students of an academic who was a practising ethnomusicologist only three years after the term was coined. Although most of his university career was spent at the University of Auckland, Mervyn's influence in the fields of Pacific music research and archiving were such that the contributions in this volume arc the result of both distant reputation and personal acquaintance. The volume is the product of the Study Group on Musics of Oceania within the International Council for Traditional Music, of which Mervyn has been a member for many years. The volume title is intended to encompass the span of Mervyn's professional interests, which include the role of archives in Oceanic music research and performance; material culture collections in music research and performance; the role of transcription in music research and performance; the importance of bibliographic research in tracing the connections between the past and the present; the significance of collaboration in research, particularly with scholars in other disciplines, and its significance to performance; and the colonial encounter and its implications for historical and contemporary performance.

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  • A two-phase algorithm for the biobjective integer minimum cost flow problem

    Raith, Andrea; Ehrgott, Matthias (2007)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    We present an algorithm to compute a complete set of efficient solutions for the biobjective integer minimum cost flow problem. We use the two phase method with a parametric network simplex algorithm in phase 1 to compute all supported non-dominated extreme points. In phase 2, the remaining nondominated points (non-extreme supported and non-supported) are computed using a k best flow algorithm on single-objective weighted sum problems. We implement the algorithm and report run-times on problem instances generated with a modified version of the NETGEN generator and also for some networks with grid structure.

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  • The role of the board of directors in ensuring the involvment of key influence figures in strategic management

    Paddy, Rex (1981)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    The Problem Stated - 'How to involve the most senior decision makers in a regular strategic appraisal which results in a written strategy capable of guiding all major decisions of the company'. Since the early 1960's the basic concepts of corporate planning, strategic planning or strategic management have been well documented in both the academic and popular literature. The theory has not changed a great deal although the language used to express the theory has changed, the timespan has shortened (oil crisis) and the amount of quantification has decreased.

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  • Bibliography. Cultural Diversity: Issues for Social Work in New Zealand 1990-2010

    Bingham, Patricia (2011)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    This bibliography attempts to bring together research and literature relevant to multicultural and indigenous social work practice in New Zealand.

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  • Bibliography. Social Work Pertaining to Maori in New Zealand: Ngā Mahi Toko I Te Ora O Te Iwi Māori 1990-2010

    Bingham, Patricia (2011)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    This bibliography is an attempt to bring together research and literature of interest to social work professionals working with Māori in New Zealand.

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  • Social Work Bibliography. Working with Asian Clients in New Zealand 1990-2010 (2nd edition)

    Bingham, Patricia (2011)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    This bibliography is an attempt to bring together research and literature of interest to social work professionals working with Asian clients in New Zealand.

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  • Quality ECE for under-two year olds: What should it look like? A literature review.

    Dalli, C; White, EJ; Rockel, Jean; Duhn, I (2011)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    Recent years have seen increasing participation of under-two-year-olds in early childhood education. This literature review draws together relevant research evidence to better understand what quality early childhood education for children under-two-years of age should look like.

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  • An investigation of pedagogically and technically appropriate virtual learning and collaboration environments

    Paton, Christopher (2007)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    There are many terms that describe the employment of assorted technologies via the internet (or local intranet) in order to assist and better learning, both in terms of performance and knowledge. This integration of ICT with learning theory has been popularly coined 'e-learning or 'web based learning', (WBL). The effective use of these novel technologies should optimise learning and should also justify the considerable investments in time and money that are required to properly establish them. To achieve this it follows that our use of educational technologies must be guided by established educational theory. E-learning has been heralded as a unique tool that can assist in the establishment of modern pedagogical models in particular by enabling individualised learning while promoting an interactive role for the educator. In a web based learning environment the educator can act as a facilitator of learning, as opposed to a mere disseminator of content that is the role sometimes ascribed to instructors in more traditional models. While there is much discussion regarding how best to implement the various new tools that e-learning offers, the increasing number of publications relating to educational technologies highlights the need for evidence relating to when, how and which option to employ. This report will address these issues. We will present the existing research or empirical data available that gives evidence to guide informed decisions and support definitive protocols regarding the use of these technologies in medical education. In addition similar data from outside of a medical environment gives breadth to our understanding of the problem.

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  • Guava moth, Coscinoptycha improbana (Lepidoptera: Carposinidae)in New Zealand - larval identification, biology, distribution, hosts and phenology.

    Jamieson, LE; Seldon, David; Dawson, T; Gibb, AR; Suckling, DM; Dymock, JJ; Froud, KJ; Hoare, RJB (2003)

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    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Identification in Regression Discontinuity Designs with Measurement Error

    Yu, Ping (2011)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper studies the identification of the treatment effect by the local polynomial estimator in regression discontinuity designs with measurement error. In the sharp design, when the measurement error is fixed, the treatment effect can be identified in some special cases if the treatment is based on the contaminated forcing variable, and cannot be identified if the treatment is based on the genuine forcing variable. If the measurement error is shrinking to zero, the treatment effect can be identified with a small extra bias and without efficiency loss if the treatment is based on the contaminated forcing variable; the treatment effect can be identified with efficiency loss and a large bias if the treatment is based on the genuine forcing variable and the treatment status can be observed; the treatment effect cannot be identified if the treatment is based on the genuine forcing variable and the treatment status cannot be observed unless the measurement error is extremely small. We extend the results to the fuzzy design. The Monte Carlo results confirm the theoretical analysis.

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  • Non-separability and complete reducibility: $E_n$ examples with an application to a question of Külshammer

    Uchiyama, Tomohiro (2015)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    Let $G$ be a simple algebraic group of type $E_n (n=6,7,8)$ defined over an algebraically closed field $k$ of characteristic $2$. We present examples of triples of closed reductive groups $Hulshammer on representations of finite groups in reductive groups. We also consider a rationality problem for $G$-complete reducibility and a problem concerning conjugacy classes.

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  • An evaluation of sample adequacy for the Lapita-style ceramic assemblages from three sites located in the Reef/Santa Cruz group, Outer Eastern Islands of the Solomons.

    Green, R. C. Roger Curtis 1932- (2009)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    Emeritus Professor Roger Green is an archaeologist in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Auckland. His interests include the anthropological history of the Pacific derived from detailed study of the archaeology, linguistics and ethnography of the region developed over 50 years of research. The Reef/Santa Cruz Lapita sites discussed in this volume were excavated by Roger Green as part of the Southeast Solomons Culture History project in the early 1970s. These three sites were, and continue to be, central to the development of our understanding of the Lapita phenomenon, situated as they are in the first island group east of the Near/Remote Oceania boundary. Given their status these key sites have been the focus of considerable review and debate. This volume provides commentary on aspects of that debate, and makes available detailed analysis of variation in ceramic decorative motifs which is used in the support of a model of chronological change and continuity for these sites.

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  • Raurimu frontier town 1900-1925 : a social archaeological perspective

    Hill, Kate (1999)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    Sites associated with railway construction have received little attention in New Zealand historical archaeology, partly because their transient nature has left virtually no mark in the archaeological record, and partly through poor or lost documentation. In the case of the camps associated with the building of the central portion of the North Island Main Trunk Line, some were 10 evolve into thriving sawmilling towns. However, the finite nature of this extractive industry and the change from a rail to a road centred transport system eventually condemned many such towns to obscurity. This volume aims to reconstruct, through the usc of archival evidence and archaeological reconnaissance, the trajectory of the settlement of Raurimu from its origins as a Main Trunk construction camp to its eventual establishment as a sawmilling / railway town which was devastated by fire in IlJ25. Situated in the immediate vicinity of the highly publicised Raurimu Spiral, the construction camp embodies the problem of bias inherent in much archaeological or historical research that involves the juxtaposition of the transient and the monumental. Typically. the monument has been privileged at the expense of the mundane. I consider a multitude of social issues with a specific focus on gender as well as briefly addressing transient communities, the private enterprise that accompanied them, and relations between the co-operative workers and the Public Works Department. As a microcosm of the established town's economic vicissitudes, the Spiral Refreshment Rooms provide the material for a short case slUdy. The destructive and "preservative" role played by fire in the settlement is also considered. The functional transition from railway construction to sawmilling is found to be parallelled by a physical transition from one locality to another. Indicators of permanence are traced through changes in the occupational base of the population, increasing numbers of women, an increase in permanent housing and the establishment of Government facilities and community institutions.

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  • Protecting historic places in New Zealand

    Allen, Harry (1998)

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    The University of Auckland Library

    The government should create a new heritage agency to purchase Crown heritage services, provide policy advice to the Crown, take responsibility for national heritage strategies, policies, methodologies and standards, identify nationally significant heritage through a Register and finally, protect and manage nationally significant heritage through a balance of voluntary incentives (national heritage fund) and regulation. Given the totality of Acts administered by local and central government which have a direct impact on Maori heritage, a new stand alone Maori heritage body is needed, one that is charged with the advancement of Maori heritage interests both within and outside of government.

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  • Changes in Aged Care Residents’ Characteristics and Dependency in Auckland 1988 to 2008. Findings from OPAL 10/9/8 Older Persons’ Ability Level Census

    Boyd, Michal; Connolly, Martin; Kerse, Ngaire; Foster, Susan; von Randow, Martin; Lay-Yee, Roy; Chelimo, Carol; Broad, Joanna; Whitehead, Noeline; Walters-Puttick, Sarah (2009)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    Are older people in aged care facilities frailer and more dependent now than in previous years? Many aged residential care (ARC) providers in New Zealand report that the dependency levels of their residents have increased considerably in recent years, yet there is little longitudinal evidence to support this perception (Kiata, Kerse, & Dixon, 2005). The purpose of the 2008 Older Persons’ Ability Level (OPAL 10/9/8) study was to evaluate the demographics and dependency of the current generation in aged residential care. Since 1988, four dependency census surveys provided data describing all ARC residents in the Auckland region. These studies were conducted in 1988, 1993, 1998, and 2008. They were performed by the Academic Section of Geriatric Medicine (1988, 1993, & 1998) and the Freemasons’ Department of Geriatric Medicine (2008) from The University of Auckland (Bonita, et al., 1990a; Bonita, et al., 1990b; Broad, et al., 1995a; Wood, et al., 1998a; Wood, et al., 1998b). The same assessment tool and similar protocols were used for each of the studies providing a 20-year span of comparable resident dependency data.

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  • Charles Darwin's Geophysical Reports as Models of the Theory of Catastrophic Waves

    Galiev, Shamil Usmanovich (2010)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

    As it is the 200th anniversary of Darwin’s birth, 2009 has also been marked as 170 years since the publication of his book Journal of Researches, commonly referred to as The Voyage of the Beagle. During the voyage Darwin landed at Valdivia and Concepcion, Chile, just before, during and after a great earthquake which demolished hundreds of buildings, killing and injuring many people. It was a giant natural catastrophe. He saw the land rise before his eyes. Land was waved, lifted, and cracked, volcanoes awoke and giant ocean waves attacked the coast. There are two main goals of this book. The first is emphasising the priority of Darwin in the description and the analysis of the results of the severe earthquakes (Chapter I). Extracts from Darwin’s Diary and Narrative 2, ‘Journal of Researches’ and ‘The autobiography of Charles Darwin’ are presented. In the extracts Darwin described a few days of his work. Perhaps, those days were among the most important days of his life. We group the material of the extracts so that a reader can trace the evolution of Darwin’s thoughts. The key observations and ideas of Darwin, presented in the material, are shortly formulated. Then these ideas are analysed and compared with modern experimental and theoretical data. Taking into account Darwin’s key ideas we construct the mathematical models of natural catastrophic phenomena. Chapters II and III are devoted to catastrophic ocean waves. The Lagrangian description is used. Highly-nonlinear wave equations, which describe the evolution of the waves propagating over a variable depth, are derived. Attention is focused on the transresonant evolution of periodic ocean waves and tsunami. It was found that the height of the catastrophic waves changes from two to four of the height of the significant waves. The theory of uplift, loosening and rupture of weakly-cohesive geomaterials, gassy soils, and magma under sharp decompression within tension-seismic waves is developed in Chapter IV. The last Chapter is devoted to Nonlinear Science problems, in particular, to the transresonant evolution of initially smooth wave motion into vortex motion and turbulence. This evolution can take place in many layered systems: ground, ocean, air, and plasma. The generation of elastica (mushroom)-like waves, surface drops and jets, vortices and turbulence is simulated by the same highly-nonlinear wave equation. The results were used so that to describe the vortex generation in the Bose-Einstein condensate and plasma of early Universe.

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