2,414 results for Report

  • Oscillation Revisited

    Beer, G; Cao, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    In previous work by Beer and Levi [8, 9], the authors studied the oscillation Ω(f, A) of a function f between metric spaces hX, di and hY, ρi at a nonempty subset A of X, defined so that when A = {x}, we get Ω(f, {x}) = ω(f, x), where ω(f, x) denotes the classical notion of oscillation of f at the point x ∈ X. The main purpose of this article is to formulate a general joint continuity result for (f, A) 7→ Ω(f, A) valid for continuous functions.

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  • Pricing Variance Swaps in a Hybrid Model of Stochastic Volatility and Interest Rate With Regime-switching

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this paper, we consider the problem of pricing discretely-sampled variance swaps based on a hybrid model of stochastic volatility and stochastic interest rate with regime-switching. Our modeling framework extends the Heston stochastic volatility model by including the CIR stochastic interest rate and model parameters that switch according to a continuous-time observable Markov chain process. A semi-closed form pricing formula for variance swaps is derived. The pricing formula is assessed through numerical implementations, and the impact of including regime-switching on pricing variance swaps is also discussed.

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  • Three Open Problems on the Wijsman Topology

    Cao, J

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Since it first emerged in Wijsman's seminal work [29], the Wijsman topology has been intensively studied in the past 50 years. In particular, topological properties of Wijsman hyperspaces, relationships between the Wijsman topology and other hyperspace topologies, and applications of the Wijsman topology in analysis have been explored. However, there are still several fundamental open problems on this topology. In this article, the author gives a brief survey on these problems and some up-to-date partial solutions.

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  • Our Futures. Te Pae Tawhiti. The 2013 census and New Zealand's changing population

    Hawke, G; Bedford, R; Kukutai, T; McKinnon, M; Olssen, E; Spoonley, P

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    Our Futures: Te Pae Tawhiti brings together data and analysis from the 2013 census and other sources, together with input from a wide range of researchers, to provide evidence-based pointers to the future of New Zealand society. It covers seven key themes: diversity, population change, tangata whenua, migration, households and families, regional variation, and work.

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  • Clusters and Hubs: toward a regional architecture for voluntary adaptive migration in the Pacific

    Burson, B; Bedford, R

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Mid-term evaluation of the Strengthening Pacific Partnerships project

    Nunns, H; Roorda, M; Bedford, C; Bedford, R

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    This report presents the findings of an independent, mid-term evaluation of the Strengthening Pacific Partnerships (SPP) project for the 18 month period October 2011 to March 2013. The main report presents the valuation findings about the SPP project, including general observations about the seven Pacific States involved in SPP. Appendix A includes the specific findings for each of the States.1 In this report, the term “respondent” refers to a person who was interviewed for the evaluation. The term “official” refers to a Government employee in a Pacific state unless otherwise stated.

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  • 2014 Fieldays in Hamilton: Economic impacts for the Waikato Region and New Zealand

    Hughes, Warren (2014)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The 2014 Fieldays event over 11 –14 June attracted 119,892 gate entries which was 4.2% lower than in 2013. For the 2014 event, a total of 942 firms exhibited their goods and services (up 4.9% over 2013) including 71 overseas firms (+109%) using a total of 1366 exhibitor sites (+4.8%).

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  • An Evaluation of Clinical Supervision of Allied Health Professionals from Two District Health Boards: A preliminary summary report

    O'Donoghue, KB

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Postgraduate education for sustainability at Lincoln University, New Zealand

    Spicer,, A.; Barthelmeh, Michael R.; Montgomery, Roy L.; Spellerberg, Ian F.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    Sustainability is an inexact and contested term: – Jacobs (1999) places it in the same category as ‘social justice’ and ‘liberty’ i.e. concepts that are elusive but nonetheless vital to political functioning. Despite the drawbacks of the term, sustainability is part of our everyday language. Research in this area, for instance, is increasing (Schoolman et al., 2012) and so are employment opportunities (Atkisson 2011; Sainty, 2007). This provides tertiary institutions with some interesting questions. How can they include sustainability in the curriculum given that there are multiple ways of assessing its meaning and importance, and given that the topic is highly interdisciplinary and that it involves a different world view (i.e. a network, systems approach) from currently dominant views (e.g. an individualistic approach)? This report looks at the options for teaching sustainability at the postgraduate level at Lincoln University, New Zealand. It may be helpful to read this report in conjunction with LEaP Report 25 (Spicer et al. 2011) which considered the options for including Education for Sustainability in the undergraduate curriculum of the same University. However all material relevant to an Education for Sustainability at the postgraduate level that is common to both reports has been reproduced here.

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  • State of the tourism industry 2016

    Wilson, Judith; Simmons, David G.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This report examines the last ten years of tourism in New Zealand and gives a snapshot of the current state and performance of the tourism industry. It is the sixth publication in an annual series produced by Lincoln University and Tourism Industry Aotearoa (TIA).

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  • Māori farming trusts - A preliminary scoping investigation into the governance and management of large dairy farm businesses.

    Phillips, Tom; Woods, Christine; Lythberg, Billie

    Report
    Massey University

    This preliminary scoping study investigates areas for possible improvement in the governance and management of large Māori dairy farm businesses. Building on the innovative practices of their tūpuna – including Rawiri Taiwhanga, the country’s first commercial dairy farmer – Māori are defining their own aspirations, realities and goals in the dairy farming world (Durie 1998, 2000). This report outlines these, and their accompanying challenges, as expressed by individuals and collectives currently engaged in Māori Dairy farm businesses. The Māori way of doing business is described in this study as having a ‘Quadruple Bottom Line of Profit, People, Environment and Community’ business objectives. More specifically, ‘Māori farms often have an inverted Quadruple Bottom Line. People, Environment and their Community often come before Profit….but without Profit none of it happens.’ Māori strategic plans and business values place emphasis on relationships, responsibilities, reciprocity and respect. These are exemplars of a Māori world-view, which explicitly acknowledges particular historic and cultural contexts (Tapsell and Woods 2010). The strategic management plans of the Māori Farming Trusts illustrate the spiral or matrix of values ‘He korunga o nga tikanga’ envisaged by Nicholson, Hēnare and Woods (2012). They prioritise the development of social capital to create competitive advantage. Such strategic plans reflect Māori vision and aspirations. These are to sustain and grow the land base; to provide leadership and guidance for the whānau; to develop capacity and resources within the Trusts and to perform better as businesses.

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  • Active music

    Rickson, Daphne; Evans, Axel; Claydon, Natasha Ratitihuia; Dennis, Patrice; Dovey, Kate; Francis, Tess Kiernan; Pollock, Janiece; Sos, Shafiq; Erin, Upjohn-Beatson; Williams, Kwame; Dombroski, Jacob; McMahon, Sarah; Haanen, Tessa; Watkins, Edward

    Report
    Massey University

    We are a group of eleven young people with intellectual disability and three music therapists. We did action research at a university. We wanted to find out how a music group might be helpful for young people with intellectual disabilities. We wanted to tell our own story and use our own words because we have a lot to say. We wanted people to read our story and to use our ideas to help young people with intellectual disabilities to have good lives. We went to twenty sessions of music research, and five more sessions of research analysis. We also did a lot of research work in between sessions. We found out that music groups can be fun. They can also be hard work. They help us develop skills like listening and waiting. They are places where we can be independent. But music groups are also good places to practice working as a team. They can be safe places for people to express emotions. Music helps us to know people. It brings us together. Playing musical instruments can also help physical development. A good life for us would include having the chance to play music with others or to have music lessons. But it is not always easy for us to go to ordinary lessons or music groups. It might be important for young people with intellectual disability to have support from people who understand them at first. We want to be independent but we need help to develop our dreams in practical ways. We found that doing research is fun and interesting. We were all researchers but we had different things to do. The adults had to be the organisers, setting up the research. We knew from the start the research would be about what young people think about music. The adults had done their reading and had written the literature review. The young people decided on other questions, and gathered data in lots of different ways. They also did some of the analysis, and decided on the findings of each cycle. The findings of each cycle, with more of the young people’s words, are in the appendices. Later, the adults wrote the main findings, the discussion and conclusion. We all discussed the things we wrote along the way and at the end of the research. The adults have tried to help the young people understand what has been written. The research took a lot of time and it was hard work for everybody. To be a good researcher you need to learn research skills. It is important that young people with intellectual disabilities are not exhausted by research. They need to be able to enjoy the things they are doing. We all liked being involved in research even though it was hard work. We think that research is important and helpful. Young people should be involved in research that is about them. We learnt that young people with intellectual disabilities can go to university. Going to university was scary at first but we got used to it and we started to enjoy it. We need to do more research to make sure universities are ready to welcome students with intellectual disabilities. We can use our research to show universities that it can be a good idea to support people with intellectual disabilities to go to university. We can also use our research show people what we can do; what we like to do; and what we want to do in the future. Most of us would like to do more music and research in future.

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  • Lifelong literacy: Issues of strategy

    Sligo, F; Watson, B; Murray, N; Comrie, M; Vaccarino, F; Tilley, E

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • The Dunedin Energy Study 2015-2016

    Dippie, Olive; Stephenson, Janet; Jack, Michael (2017-04)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The Dunedin Energy Baseline Study is a joint research project between the Dunedin City Council (DCC) and the Centre for Sustainability at the University of Otago. The study takes stock of and analyses energy inputs to the city of Dunedin for the 2015 calendar year and 2016 financial year. This report builds on the Dunedin Energy Baseline Study which took stock of the year 2014. This study is an action under the DCC’s Energy Plan 1.0, which recognises the need to encourage research that will enable monitoring of Dunedin's energy uses and inputs. This study will also help inform and assist with implementing other Energy Plan 1.0's actions, such as the Night City action (improve lighting efficiency) and Cosy Homes action (improving heating of homes). The study was conducted between December 2016 and February 2017. The data collected was for inputs of consumer energy to Dunedin from 1 January 2015 to 30 June 2016. The findings provide an estimation of the total amount of each fuel type used within the city, with some indication of the main end uses of energy, and energy-related greenhouse gas emissions. Precise data was not available for some fuel types and where this is the case we explain the method of estimation and reason for the uncertainty. The project relied heavily on the willingness of many businesses and organisations to supply data. The project partners are extremely grateful to all participating individuals and organisations who dedicated a considerable amount of time to sourcing, compiling and providing relevant data. Throughout the report, 2015CY refers to calendar year (1 January – 31 December 2015) and 2016FY refers to financial year (1 July 2015 – 30 June 2016).

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  • Lincoln Hub data and Information architecture project: DATA²: Data architecture transforming access & analysis

    Carnaby, Penny; Charters, Stuart; Staincliffe, P.; Cahalane, R.; Laurenson, M.; Gibb, R.; McGlinchy, A.; Sutherland, S.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The vision for the DATA² project is to enable the intellectual capital produced by researchers and scientists in the Lincoln Hub to be better managed, curated and shared for reuse. This will facilitate the production of new knowledge and innovation of direct benefit to New Zealand’s economic, environmental, social and cultural aspirations over time.

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  • Interest groups, vested interests, and the myth of apolitical administration : the politics of land tenure reform on the South Island of New Zealand

    Brower, Ann L.

    Report
    Lincoln University

    This report explores the political history, property rights, and administrative politics of the land tenure reform process to ask why the Crown has paid farmers millions of dollars to convert land from leasehold to freehold. Since 1992, runholders have received collectively 58% (or 165,446 hectares) of the reformed pastoral estate as fee-simple, and $15.5 million. The report documents the results of research in the South Island of New Zealand during Fulbright grant year 2004-05. Land tenure reform is a process of dividing up the Crown pastoral estate into freehold and public conservation land. The pastoral estate constitutes about one-tenth of NZ's landmass. The Crown holds all 2.4 million hectares of the pastoral estate; and it has alienated, or leased out, certain use rights to the lessees. Now the Crown is in the process of purchasing pastoral and occupation use rights and land improvements back from the lessee, on the hectares shifting into DOC custody. And the lessees are in the process of purchasing a whole bundle of Crown-held use rights on the hectares passing to freehold. This Crown-held bundle of use rights includes subdivision, condominium construction, ski field development, viticulture, safari park development, and automobile tyre testing centre development. The Crown-held bundle even includes such mundane use rights as planting grass seeds without prior consent of the Commissioner of Crown Lands. Chapter 2 deconstructs the numerical results - hectares and dollars - of the land reform policy endeavour so far, and reveals that these numbers are contested. Quite simply, it depends on what you count and how you count them. And those methodological counting decisions, while appearing dry and clinical, most certainly are not. Numbers are the stuff of public policy, and decisions on how to count them are the stuff of politics. Further, the number of hectares is misleading, as it is use rights being exchanged here, not the hectares themselves. Chapter 3, "Interest Groups, Property Rights, and States' Rights: The Sagebrush Rebellion and New Zealand Land Tenure Reform", examines the political history of South Island public grazing land, from first establishment of pastoral licenses in 1856 to the 1998 passage of legislation governing the disestablishment of the pastoral lease system. It takes a comparative perspective, using the Sagebrush Rebellion launched by ranchers in the American West as a lens. It concludes that NZ farmers' push for freehold succeeded while the American ranchers' campaign failed, for three reasons: 1) property rights arrangements in NZ pastoral leases allow lessees to exclude recreationists and other trespassers, while not in the US; 2) the lack of legally-sanctioned reliable recreation access and conservation provisions in the leases led NZ's most prominent conservation and recreation advocacy groups to join the farmers' campaign for land tenure reform, while similar US groups opposed the Sagebrush Rebellion; 3) NZ farmers were able to use administrative and institutional momentum from the state sector reforms of the 1980s in their campaign for reform. Next chapter 4, "Trading Sticks with the Crown: Redistributing Property Rights to Effect Land Use Change" explores the current distribution and redistribution of property rights in the Crown pastoral estate, in order to examine the merits of using property rights as a tool to create land use change. It deconstructs property rights arrangements in pastoral leases into their constituent parts and finds that there is some uncertainty surrounding the relationship between the lessee-held exclusive occupation right and the Crown-held non-pastoral use rights. It concludes that this uncertainty is a matter to be addressed by the Courts, not by government contractors or even government officials. Finally, it offers alternative policy tools to achieve the desired changes in land use with an eye to reducing the cost to the government. The last chapter, "Who is sticking up for the Crown? The myth of apolitical administration in New Zealand land tenure reform" evaluates the results of land reform on the national scale by looking at the administrative politics within the process managed by Land Information New Zealand (LINZ). It observes that the numerical results of tenure review are strongly biased in favour of the farmer, with the farmers receiving 58% of the land as freehold, fee simple private property, and receiving millions of dollars in "equalization payments". It concludes that LINZ's subscription to the myth of apolitical administration is leading the agency that represents the Crown's vested interest in the land to take a position of neutrality in negotiations instead of one of advocacy. LINZ relies on a functional split between policy and operations, which in turn relies on the oldest trick in the book of public administration - the politics-administration dichotomy. These two models share a common goal - avoiding agency capture in policy implementation - and administrative tool - neutrality. But in this case, striving for neutrality is neutralizing the Crown's vested interest in the land. LINZ cannot be neutral and advocate for the Crown's interest at the same time. Thus over-reliance on the myth of apolitical administration is leading to a result that out-captures agency capture theories of interest group politics. This report does not paint a rosy picture of land tenure reform. It concludes that the myth of apolitical administration supercedes interest group politics and property rights, and leads the Crown to take a neutral stance in the face of powerful special interests motivated to diversify land use, be it for venison farming, viticulture, or lifestyle blocks. It is impossible to remove politics from inherently political decisions such as redistributing valuable resources. And it can be a dangerous endeavour. In this case, striving for neutrality in order to achieve a fair, unbiased, and uncaptured result is doomed to fail on all counts, no matter how well-intentioned the attempt. The Crown is asserting neither its property rights nor its bargaining powers. Instead, the Crown's position of neutrality leads it to give away valuable property rights and pay constituents to take it. In short, the myth of apolitical administration makes the Crown complicit giving away freehold title to New Zealand's iconic high country, and paying the lease-holders to take it. To sum up, the politics of land tenure reform remain win-win as long as the Crown agrees to lose. This is not an indictment of LINZ. I have no data to support a claim that the agency's attempts at neutrality are anything but honest, competent, and well-intentioned. But placing "neutral" and "vested interest" in the same task description will not work. One will lose. In this case, it is the vested interest, the Crown, and ultimately the NZ people.

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  • Technical report one: Methods for the creation of terms for indexing social work education in Aotearoa New Zealand (TISWEANZ).

    Ballantyne, N; Beddoe, L; Hay, K; Maidment, J; Ngan, L; Walker, S

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Technical report three: TISWEANZ taxonomy.

    Ballantyne, N; Beddoe, L; Hay, K; Maidment, J; Ngan, L; Walker, S

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Climate Change 2014 - Synthesis Report

    Sims, REH

    Report
    Massey University

    An overview report of the Contributions of Working groups 1,2 and 3 to the 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

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  • The wider voice: Wanganui community perspectives on adult literacy and employment 2005-2006

    Comrie, M; Tilley, E; Neilson, D; Murray, N; Sligo, F; Vaccarino, F

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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