2,490 results for Report

  • Climate Change 2014 - Synthesis Report

    Sims, REH

    Report
    Massey University

    An overview report of the Contributions of Working groups 1,2 and 3 to the 5th Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

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  • The wider voice: Wanganui community perspectives on adult literacy and employment 2005-2006

    Comrie, M; Tilley, E; Neilson, D; Murray, N; Sligo, F; Vaccarino, F

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • MY FRIENDS Youth final evaluation report

    MacDonald, J; Bourke, R; Berg, M; Burgon, J

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Kia Piki te Ora Suicide Prevention Programme Evaluation Final Report

    Andrews, CA; Manu, H

    Report
    Massey University

    Suicide and suicidal behaviour continue to be a major public health issue in New Zealand. Each year more than 500 New Zealanders take their lives and there are over 2500 admissions to hospital for intentional self-harm. The latest statistics in 2012 show that almost one in five completed suicides were Māori suicides and the Māori youth suicide rates were 2.8 times higher than non-Māori youth. Kia Piki te Ora Māori suicide prevention service (Kia Piki te Ora), operating in nine DHB regions is one element of the social sector’s work towards longer-term goals of reduced suicides, and harm associated with suicidal behaviour in Māori communities. This recent evaluation report shows that generally stakeholders felt that Kia Piki te Ora’s contribution to Māori suicide prevention worked well when providers engaged with the community. However, the widespread of activities undertaken by the nine providers meant that in some instances stakeholders were unclear on the core role and responsibilities of Kia Piki te Ora.

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  • Energy-smart food for people and climate

    Sims, RE

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Developing Valid and Reliable Rubrics for Writing Assessment: Research and Practice

    Comer, KV

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • Technical report two: Analysis of curriculum documents.

    Ballantyne, N; Beddoe, L; Hay, K; Maidment, J; Ngan, L; Walker, S

    Report
    Massey University

    false

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  • The sustainable delivery of sexual violence prevention education in schools

    Julich, SJ; Oak, E; Terrell, J; Good, G

    Report
    Massey University

    Sexual violence is a crime that cannot be ignored: it causes our communities significant consequences including heavy economic costs, and evidence of its effects can be seen in our criminal justice system, public health system, Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC), and education system, particularly in our schools. Many agencies throughout New Zealand work to end sexual violence. Auckland-based Rape Prevention Education: Whakatu Mauri (RPE) is one such agency, and is committed to preventing sexual violence by providing a range of programmes and initiatives, information, education, and advocacy to a broad range of audiences. Up until early 2014 RPE employed one or two full-time positions dedicated to co-ordinating and training a large pool (up to 15) of educators on casual contracts to deliver their main school-based programmes, BodySafe – approximately 450 modules per year, delivered to some 20 high schools. Each year several of the contract educators, many of whom were tertiary students, found secure full time employment elsewhere. To retain sufficient contract educators to deliver its BodySafe contract meant that RPE had to recruit, induct and train new educators two to three times every year. This model was expensive, resource intense, and ultimately untenable. The Executive Director and core staff at RPE wanted to develop a more efficient and stable model of delivery that fitted its scarce resources. To enable RPE to know what the most efficient model was nationally and internationally, with Ministry of Justice funding, RPE commissioned Massey University to undertake this report reviewing national and international research on sexual violence prevention education (SVPE). [Background from Executive Summary.]

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  • Smaller scale New Zealand dairy farmers: long term plans and key challenges

    Westbrooke, Victoria; Nuthall, Peter; Phillips, Tom

    Report
    Massey University

    Farmer wellbeing has been defined as “a dynamic process that gives people a sense of how their lives are evolving” (Nimpagariste & Culver, 2010). In order to support and enhance the wellbeing of farmers in New Zealand, the farmers’ goals, future plans and challenges to their plans all need to be understood. A particular group of interest is smaller scale dairy farmers. The average size of dairy farms in developed agricultural nations is increasing and New Zealand is no different. A high proportion (62%) of NZ dairy herds are smaller scale, milking less than 400 cows at peak. Their wellbeing, now and in the future, is important to the New Zealand dairy industry as a whole. Consequently, the aim of this study is to develop an understanding of smaller-scale dairy farmers’ future goals, plans and challenges so that recommendations can be made to enhance and support their wellbeing in the future. Farms who peak milked less than 400 cows were surveyed via telephone. A total of 346 surveys were completed, in Taranaki (n=103), the Waikato (n=144) and Northland (n=99). The majority of respondents’ were owner-operators (75%), male (67%), born and bred in a rural area (79%), and between 40 and 60 years old (57%). Overall, the mean farm size was 97ha, with 240 cows producing 86,789kgMS with 0.83 of a full time employee. Respondents’ had high (67%) equity levels in their businesses and a third (35%) had non-farming investments. Farmers’ most likely future investments were related to their current farming business, that is reducing debt to very low levels and increasing production by more than 10%. Based on farmers future plans and challenges reported and discussed in this study, it is clear the smaller scale dairy farmers would like knowledge and assistance in five key areas; succession, regulation and compliance, staff, technology and cash-flow/profitability. This report concludes with suggestions for each of these areas, which has the potential to maintain or increase the wellbeing of smaller scale dairy farmers in New Zealand. [Executive summary]

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  • Te Ao Hurihuri population: Past, present & future

    Kukutai, Tahu; Rarere, Moana (2014-07)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    The NIDEA Te Ao Hurihuri series uses data from the New Zealand Census of Population and Dwellings to examine key aspects of Maori population change.

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  • Western Bay of Plenty District: Demographic Profile 1986 - 2031

    Jackson, Natalie; Rarere, Moana (2014-05)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    This report outlines the demographic changes that have occurred in Western Bay of Plenty District, as well as what trends are expected in the future.

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  • Total value of irrigation land in Canterbury

    Saunders, Caroline; Saunders, John

    Report
    Lincoln University

    The purpose of this report is to provide CDC with the ability to estimate the total benefits for Canterbury and New Zealand from irrigation scenarios under the implementation of the Canterbury Water Strategy. This report describes a series of assumptions which under pin a model for valuing irrigation. The model is built allowing different prices, uptake rates, irrigated area and different land uses of irrigated land, to be defined. The prices valuing land use are informed from both international and national data sources and use the Lincoln Trade and Environment Model (LTEM) to allow the possibility of different international policy market scenarios to be modelled. Using these sources the model assigns values to different land uses under irrigation, and projects price trends until to 2031. The model gives final outputs in total revenue and employment effects from 2014 to 2031. This includes the direct, indirect and induced effects by using the Canterbury Economic Development Model. The results presented here are based on a five year rate of uptake and predicted land uses of irrigated area as 58 per cent dairy, 18 per cent irrigated sheep and beef, 20 per cent arable and 3 per cent high-value arable. Additionally irrigated land in all scenarios is assumed to have been previously utilised for dryland sheep and beef farms.

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  • The Cookbook: A discussion on the process, pitfalls and successes of hacking an open textbook

    Pearson, Erika (2014-05-16)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This document represents the process and reflections on the creation and curation of an open source 'texthack' for a media studies textbook for students in Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific. This document is provided as a resource for anyone contemplating a similar texthack project. Suggestions on processes and issues for consideration are presented along with information about success and difficulties of this specific project. The final curated 'text' this document refers to can be found at http://mediatexthack.wordpress.com.

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  • Energy Transitions: Lighting in Vanuatu

    Walton, Sara; Doering, Adam; Gabriel, Cle-Anne; Ford, Rebecca (2014)

    Report
    University of Otago

    Lighting Vanuatu began in 2010 as a two-year project funded through The Australian Aid - Governance for Growth Programme. The primary objective of the project was to increase access of portable solar lanterns for rural Vanuatu communities in an effort to reduce their dependency on kerosene as the primary source of household lighting. To achieve this goal the project offered a supply-side subsidy for two Vanuatu NGOs (ACTIV and VANREPA) to support the distribution of 24, 000 solar lamps mainly to rural areas. The subsidy was aimed at improving bulk purchasing power by the NGO’s in an effort to reduce the price of the imported solar lights at the household level. The analysis of the Independent Completion Review (ICR), Business Case Study (Annex 1), and the Survey Data Overview (Annex 3) indicate that the Lighting Vanuatu project has been successful in enabling the uptake and awareness of portable solar lighting products. These reports highlight that the transition from kerosene lamps to solar throughout the islands of Vanuatu was both clear and ubiquitous. When framed at this descriptive level, the project certainly presents a good news story for renewable energy. The rapid transformation from a non-renewable to a renewable source of lighting within a 2 to 3 year period runs counter to many of the discussions in developed countries who struggle to disrupt the locked-in energy systems that sustain and maintain a reliance on fossil fuels. Considered alongside the slow and politically infused renewable energy debates in the developed country context, Vanuatu’s rapid adoption of portable solar lighting is precisely the kind of transitional story that many communities could only dream of achieving. However, the successful or unsuccessful acquisition and diffusion of a particular piece of technology – portable solar lamps – is only part of the story. The initial aim of the Independent Completion Review (ICR) was to identify the degree of adoption and contribution made by Lighting Vanuatu, any geographic, social or cultural trends evident in adoption patterns, any economic or social benefits, specific changes in the lighting technology used by households, changes in household practices associated with any shift in technology, and changes in householders’ perceived needs and aspirations with regard to lighting. While this descriptive analysis is essential for evaluating the success of the programme within its own terms (i.e. the ICR), the broader cultural, economic and political implications of this technological diffusion have yet to be addressed. The purpose of Annex 2, therefore, is to develop the Lighting Vanuatu story further by offering a more nuanced interpretation of the transition from kerosene to portable solar lights in rural Vanuatu communities; our emphasis and focus is different to that of the ICR, but complements and enhances the understanding of Lighting Vanuatu as an aid project. We begin by outlining the methodology used to gather and interpret the information that informs this report. We then draw on the Energy Cultures Framework (Stephenson et al., 2010) as an organising structure for describing Vanuatu’s prevailing energy culture. Next, we address four key debates to emerge from the fieldwork with the hope of encouraging a reflection on the shifting social norms and practices (economic and political) that are also ‘diffused’ with the introduction of a new piece of material culture like the portable solar lamps. The annex concludes with a comment on the implications of this analysis for future energy-related development projects in Vanuatu.

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  • New Zealand in the 21st century: A consumer lifestyles study

    Evans, Sian; Lawson, Rob; Todd, Sarah (2006)

    Report
    University of Otago

    The 2005/6 consumer lifestyles segmentation study is the fifth major survey of this type carried out by the Consumer Research Group at the University of Otago since 1979. As with previous iterations, the 2005/6 study of New Zealand consumers is intended to provide marketers and advertisers, as well as other interested observers of New Zealand society, with an insight into the psychographic patterns and behavioural trends of consumers. The survey has now established itself as one of the major studies that offers insights into New Zealand society and the changes that are taking place within the context of political and technological forces that are altering the shape of life across the globe. The Consumer Research Group is based within the University of Otago’s Department of Marketing, and this iteration of the study was jointly sponsored and funded by Loyalty NZ and NZ Post, together with funding from the University of Otago Research Grants Committee. Questionnaires comprising more than 500 individual questions were sent out to 10,000 New Zealanders in November 2005, with an effective response rate of 36% obtained. The design of the project is grounded in that of previous studies. The first of these was carried out in 1979 jointly with Heylen Research. After a period of ten years it was repeated in 1989 and, since 1995, it has been conducted at regular five yearly intervals. Throughout this time the survey has been updated to take account of new trends that have emerged in society, especially those based on technological innovations which affect our domestic, social and working lives. Innovations in this phase also include new measures designed to assess satisfaction with quality of life in New Zealand, as well as social desirability, (a personality trait that can affect responses), pet ownership and questions on commuting to work.

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  • Noise control in the wood processing industry

    McBride, David (2010-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This survey of noise in sawmilling and the wood processing industries was commissioned by ACC and carried out by the University of Otago with the aim of assessing noise within the industry and identifying simple solutions to reducing the noise. In general, noise levels were in the 90-100 dB range, regarded as very noisy. Few workplaces in New Zealand have such consistently high levels. Although the problem might seem insoluble, simple solutions at each stage could be identified. At the source of the noise, new designs of both band and circular saws can reduce the noise by up to 6 dB (a quarter of the noise). During sawmilling operations, a significant amount of noise came from timber handling, where damping of panels and reduction of “ringing” noise by filling rollers with sand could once again reduce the levels by 3 dB (half the noise). These are all critical points for action by the industry. Enclosures were quite often provided, particularly with planers and “four siders”, but periodic inspection and maintenance of these is necessary: door seals deteriorate, as does insulation around infeed and outfeed openings. Similarly, noise refuges were noisier than they should have been because of door seals and uninsulated floors. Lastly, hearing protection is not “fit and forget”. Individuals require to be trained in their use, particularly plugs which can be very effective if fitted properly. Previous reports by Welch et al (University of Auckland School of Population Health) have shown that the compressible plugs are often fitted very badly (the use of the “VeriPro” or other monitoring equipment has confirmed this).

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  • Assessment of occupational noise-induced hearing loss for ACC A practical guide for otolaryngologists

    McBride, David; Gilbert, John; Baber, Bill; Macky, Margaret; Larkin, Peter; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Skaler, Tanya (2011-01)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This Guide provides practical information for assessors providing specialist assessments for ACC occupational noise-induced hearing loss clients. It includes summaries of major literature reviews commissioned by ACC on key aspects of background information, as well as references to resources to assist assessors in providing high quality, evidence-based reports. Background information on relevant legislation and specific details of the New Zealand context, including useful guidance on carrying out assessments for third parties, are included. Current versions of key forms are presented in the Appendices – specifically the client-completed history form (ACC724) and the assessment form (ACC723). Both of these have been redesigned as part of the interaction between ACC and representatives of the New Zealand Society of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery.

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  • A report on occupational health and safety at the Fruitgrowers Chemical Company Remediation site, Mapua

    McBride, David (2012-05)

    Report
    University of Otago

    This investigation commissioned by the Department of Labour followed reports commissioned by the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment and the Ministry of Health into the clean up of this industrial site, previously used to produce and formulate agrochemicals. This report looks specifically at the occupational aspects of toxic site remediation and takes the form of an audit of compliance with the Health and Safety in Employment Act.

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  • Aquatic ecology of Lake Rotokare, Taranaki, and options for restoration

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Bell, Dudley G.; Duggan, Ian C.; Wood, Susanna A.; Tempero, Grant Wayne (2013)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Lake Rotokare is a 17.8-ha natural lake in eastern Taranaki, located 12 km east of Eltham in the 230-ha Rotokare Scenic Reserve. In 2008, the Rotokare Scenic Reserve Trust completed construction of an 8.2-km predator proof fence around the reserve. Frequent algal blooms in summer have led to long periods of lake closure to boating and contact recreation. As there are few lakes in the Taranaki region, these closures are a nuisance to the local community. The objectives of this study were to quantitatively survey the fish community of the lake and to evaluate the lake water quality for the Rotokare Scenic Reserve Trust for the purpose of advising on options for lake restoration. Water quality has not deteriorated since 1976-1980, and, if anything, has improved. Secchi disc depth in 2013 (1.95 m) was very similar to measurements in summer 1980 (mean 1.93 m on 30 January 1980). Mean dissolved reactive phosphorus (± 95% confidence interval) was greater in 1976 (190±50 mg/m³) than mean phosphate concentration in 2013 (93±31 mg/m³, p < 0.05, Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-sample test). The thermocline was deeper in 2013 at 6-7 m compared to 3-4 m in 1977. This indicates that a much greater volume of the lake was oxygenated in February 2013 than in February 1977. Also, the intensity of stratification was less in 2013, as the dissolved oxygen concentration below the thermocline was 21027% compared to just 3% in 1977. This suggests that an improvement in water quality has occurred, probably as a result of stock exclusion. To sample the fish community, boat electrofishing was used at the total of six sites. The total length fished was 1,656 m, which was 6,624 m² in area. Eighty minutes of boat electrofishing caught 234 fish (217 perch, 16 shortfin eels, and 1 longfin eel). Fishing at night showed a 16-fold increase in the catch rate of perch (125 fish/10 min of fishing) compared to fishing during the day (8 fish/10 min of fishing). Perch dominate the fish community in Lake Rotokare and the biomass and density of eels are low, which is unusual for Taranaki water bodies. The mean density of perch was 4.49 fish/100 m², and the mean density for eels was 0.29 fish/100 m². The lower eel density may be a result of impaired access for eels or may be the result of predation by perch on migrant juvenile eels. There have been changes in the zooplankton community since 1980. The North American invader Daphnia galeata was not found in 1980, and appears to have now replaced the cladoceran Bosmina meridionalis and copepod Boeckella sp. We also found a diverse rotifer community.

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  • Storm water inflow to Oranga Lake, University of Waikato Hamilton Campus

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Hamilton, David P. (2014)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    Oranga Lake is one of three constructed lakes located on the University of Waikato Hamilton campus. It has had persistent problems of high turbidity, prolific seasonal macrophyte growths and phytoplankton blooms. Recent restoration measures of pest fish removal, sediment removal and alum dosing resulted in some improvements in water clarity. But these improvements appear to have been largely temporary and water clarity is low, reducing the aesthetic value of the lake which is located in a prominent area of the campus. This study was commissioned by Facilities Management Division of the University of Waikato to determine the extent to which inputs from the main storm water inflow to Oranga Lake contribute to poor water clarity in the lake. Discharge, suspended sediment and nutrients were sampled from the main inflow on 12 occasions. These samples related to four storm events over a three-month period from November 2013 to January 2014. Sampling was conducted with the objective of capturing periods of high, medium and low flows during three separate storm events. This was achieved on two occasions during November; however, the low-intensity, short-duration storm events that occurred in January resulted in limited runoff and were not considered representative of a major summer storm event.

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