64 results for Scholarly text, 1960

  • The Wellington urban motorway : the parts played by the planning authorities and the Bolton Street Preservation Society

    Miller, Richard Ogilvy (1969)

    Bachelor of Arts thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The inadequacy of our present planning system to accomodate at the critical stage participation of interested citizens in the control of their environment. A case history showing how the negotiations between the various authorities and the Bolton Street Cemetery Preservation Society, the route of the motorway, concerning demonstrates the truth or otherwise of the hypothesis.

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  • Calendar 1961

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1961)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1960

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1960)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1962

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1962)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1964

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1964)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1963

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1963)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1965

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1965)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1966 Part 1

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1966)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1968 Part 1

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1968)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1968 Part 2

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1968)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1967 Part 1

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1967)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1966 Part 2

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1966)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1967 Part 2

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1967)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1969

    Victoria University of Wellington (Wellington, N.Z.) (1969)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • A History of Niue

    McDowell, David (1961)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    "In the beginning, this island now called Niue was nothing but coral rock (he punga)... There came a god, an aitu, from the south, a god sailed to and fro on the face of the waters. He looked down here and saw far below on the ocean the white punga rock. He let down his hook and hauled the punga up to the surface, and lo! there stood and island!" - John Lupo. The genesis of Niue remains conjectural. The Polynesian calls in a supernatural agency, an aitu from the south, to explain the emergence of the multiplication of corals and algae from the waters of the mid-Pacific to form an island two-hundred feet high, but the story of the god and his line and hook is a local adaptation of a very ancient and widespread fable, as are in varying degrees other Polynesian versions of the birth of the island, Cook advanced two further possibilities in 1777 when he speculated: "Has this Island been raised by an earthquake? Or has the sea receded from it?"

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  • Set in Perception

    Gribben, John Alasdair (1964)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    When a person is set, he is said to be prepared for narrowed range of possible events. Instead of being equally prepared for all possible contingencies, he expects only a few. The general notion has been variously expressed as selective attention, specific expectancies or hypotheses, relative sensitisation, abstraction, perceptual bias, and in many other ways. Set, as a result of such preparation, is said to lead to greater efficiency of perception, and to greater efficiency of any later behaviour dependent upon the perception.

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  • Laterality Differences in Perception

    White, Murray John (1969)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The subject of this thesis is laterality differences in perception. The term "laterality difference" refers to an asymmetry in report accuracy for stimuli presented about the center of a person's visual field. A discussion of the literature and experimental findings relevant to this topic is first given. This is followed by a detailed analysis of eight experiments which examine the effects of a number of variables on laterality differences. The main conclusion drawn from these experiments is that perceptual laterality differences are a function of acquired. Reading habits, the structural characteristics of the stimuli, and the order in which the stimuli are reported. To a lesser extent, they are also related to certain other factors such as differential eye sensitivity and handedness. An interpretation in terms of a "post-exposure trace-scanning" hypothesis is given to account for the experimental findings.

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  • The Metabolism of Gammekane and Related Compounds

    Clark, Alan Geoffrey (1967)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    1. A detailed kinetic study has been made of the glutathione S-aryl-transferases from the New Zealand grass grub (Costelytra zealandica) and from sheep liver. The insect enzyme behaves in accordance with a Michaelis-Menten model for two-substrate enzymes. It is inhibited by the sulphonphthaleins, phthaleins, fluoresceins and dicarboxylic acids competing with glutathione, while the sheep-liver enzyme is not susceptible to this type of inhibition. From this, and other data obtained from a study of the variation of kinetics with pH, it is proposed that two basic groups (possibly lysine residues) are involved in binding of glutathione to the insect enzyme, while only one such group appears in the sheep-liver enzyme. Binding of the aromatic substrate to the enzyme in both species may involve a histidine residue. 2. The accumulation of little significant radioactivity in diluant 2gamma-pentachlorocyclohexene (gamma-PCCH) during the in vitro metabolism of [14C]gamma-hexachlorohexane (gamma-HCH) suggests that the PCCH's are not formed as free intermediates during the metabolism of the HCH's. However, certain ambiguities introduced with the experimental techniques used preclude the complete exclusion of this possibility. 3. gamma-HCH, gamma-PCCH and delta-PCCH metabolized in vivo by M.domestica and C.zealandica and in vitro by preparations from both species, all produce as the principal metabolite a glutathione conjugate with chromatographic properties identical with those of authentic S-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)glutathione. There is, however some doubt as to the identity of the S-substituent moiety. 4. The in vitro metabolism of gamma-HCH and delta-PCCH is glutathione-dependent and is inhibited by various phthaleins and sulphonphthaleins. The in vivo metabolism of delta-PCCH in C.zealandica is profoundly affected by this type of compound, but its effects on the rate of metabolism in vivo of delata-HCH in M.domestica and C.zealandica are only marginal. 5. The enzyme concerned in the metabolism of delta-PCCH has been shown to differ from aryltransferase in M.domestica and C.zealandica by gel filtration techniques and by differences in activity in different enzyme preparations. The delta-PCCH-metabolising activity appears to be associated with a DDT dehydrochlorinase activity. In M.domestica, there appears to be, in addition, a second DDT dehydrochlorinase with only a low cross-specificity towards delta-PCCH.

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  • Conjugations of Carbaryl in Insects

    Heenan, Michael Perry (1969)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The conjugation of carbaryl and its initial breakdown products in insects has been examined. Houseflies, blowflies and grass grubs were dosed with [3 H] carbaryl and the water-soluble metabolites examined by a combination of paper chromatographic and ionophoretic techniques. These revealed the presence of 1-naphthyl dihydrogen phosphate, 1-naphtyl hydrogen sulphate and 1-naphthyl Beta-D-glucoside in the extracts, as well as at least seven other unidentified substances, probably including the phosphate, sulphate and glucoside conjugates of oxidation products of carbaryl. The conjugation of 1-naphthol, one of the primary metabolites of carbaryl, was examined in greater detail in flies and grass grubs. Isotope dilution and paper chromatographic analyses of extracts of insects dosed with [14 C]1-naphthol revealed the presence of the phosphomonoester, sulphate, and glucoside conjugate of 1-naphthol, but phosphodiester and glucosiduronic acid conjugates could not be detected. A new metabolite of 1-naphthol was present in extracts of dosed flies. This new metabolite, and also the corresponding p-nitrophenol metabolite, was isolated form extracts of flies fed with the parent phenols and characterised as a new conjugate, the Beta-D-glucoside 6-(dihydrogen phosphate). Some of the properties of this new conjugate were determined. 1-Naphthyl Beta-D-glucoside 6-phosphate probably accounted for one of the unidentified carbaryl conjugates.

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  • Reactions of Co-Ordinated Ligands: Schiff Base Complexes from Polyamine Complexes and Aliphatic Carbonyls

    House, Donald Alexander (1963)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    In 1954, Curtis(46,47) discovered that tris (ethylenediamine)nickel(II) perchlorate would react with acetone to form three different yellow, diamagnetic perchlorate complexes containing ligands coordinated by amine and azomethine donor groups and Blight(19) extended this reaction to other 1,2-diamine complexes of copper(II) and nickel(II). The object of this work has been:- (i) The synthesis of polyamine complexes of nickel(II) and copper(II)(84). (ii) The investigation of the nature, structure(50) and chemical properties of the products obtained by reaction of some nickel(II) and copper(II) polyamine complexes with acetone(83,85,85). (iii) The extension of the reaction to other aliphatic carbonyl compounds, especially aldehydes.

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