1,675 results for Scholarly text, 2000

  • Impact of changes in cartography and mapping on the selection of cartographic materials in New Zealand map libraries

    Bagnall, Mark James MacLaren (2002)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Changes to cartography and mapping in New Zealand have had impacts on map library identification, evaluation and selection of maps and other tools that convey spatial data. In semi-structured interviews, five map librarians gave their views on how changes to cartography and mapping affects the selection of cartographic materials. Data gathered from managers/technicians of geographic information systems laboratories were also used in the research. The results indicate that New Zealand's specialist map libraries are developing their collections and services to include electronic cartographic resources. This collection development tends not to be the result of forward looking collection policies that outline a vision and strategies for integrating hardcopy and electronic cartographic materials into collections and services. The results also indicate that map librarians are adapting their selection practices to cater for the special requirements of new cartographic information resources and to overcome some of the difficulties related to the reshaping of the mapping industry in New Zealand.

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  • Possible selves and career transition: It's who you want to be, not what you want to do

    Plimmer, G. (2007)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Desire for career change is the driver behind much adult study. Career change and going back to school as an adult are often stressful. For the individual, the experience often begins with a state of dissatisfaction about who you are and who you are becoming. Dissatisfied adults who make major career changes generally become more satisfied than those who did not, suggesting that the associated struggle is usually worthwhile (Thomas, 1980). Career transition often represents a radical break from earlier goals and plans. It may conflict with family obligations; it may involve trying out new roles and identities and revisiting past obstacles and fears (Schlossberg, 1984). Beneath the carefully written resume, the reasons for seeking career change may be fraught with emotion, uncertainty, and the desire to be someone different. Possible selves theory, when applied to new approaches to career development and adult education, helps us understand how adults manage transition and move toward being the selves that they want to become. This chapter outlines how possible selves theory is used in career development, and how these uses might apply to adult learning. It draws on theory, practice, and, for illustration, vignettes from a study of mature students’ experiences in a New Zealand polytechnic college (Schmidt, Mabbett, and Houston, 2005). It includes some personal conclusions taken from our experience of using possible selves with clients and presents a five-step process to use with learners in developing effective possible selves. Each section ends with some practical career development techniques that may be of use to adult educators. Being a mature adult in career transition is different from being a younger person, though younger people are the chief concern of traditional learning and career theories (Taylor and Giannantonio, 1990). Mature adults interpret themselves and the world with more complexity than the young (Hy and Loevinger, 1996), while also having a more narrow and specialized sense of self. Mature adults are less guided by social comparison and more guided by comparison with how they ideally want to be (Ouellete and others, 2005). Usually, they are less malleable than younger people, and may be experiencing an intense search for meaning (Zunker, 1990). Their sense of opportunity is often limited by obligations to others, like Kim, a middle-aged woman who comments that “The biggest obstacle for me is my home commitments because I have four children and a family to run”. Adult learners may also have a sense of running out of time. William, a mature part time student, is dispirited by what he calls his “protracted process” and is daunted by his realisation that “I’ve got a six year process before I’m even qualified … at that stage I’ll be 51 years old.” When an adult returns to study, it can be an attempt to break out of a sense of limited opportunities and restricted roles. Back in an education setting, adults may find their deeply held assumptions, beliefs and expectations threatened. Further, mature adults can feel like impostors, culturally alien and isolated (Brookfield, 1999). Older people in career transition often see themselves as having fewer psychological resources; they may experience more stress and less progress, and may perceive more barriers to change than younger people (Heppner, Multon, and Johnston, 1994). These themes of stress, circumscription, search for meaning, complexity, and narrowing and consolidating the self are well traversed in the adult learning and adult careers literatures (Brown and Brooks, 1996; Knowles, 1990; and Zunker, 1990).

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  • Responses to censorship issues at Auckland Public Library 1920-1940

    Walker, Pauline Jean (2001)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This report examines how historical responses to censorship issues have influenced the development of contemporary intellectual freedom ideology through an analysis of censorship challenges and responses at Auckland Public Library during the years 1920-1940. Sociological theories related to the development of public libraries and to the development of librarianship as a profession are considered. The Remarque case of 1929 is identified as a pivotal moment in the development of contemporary intellectual freedom ideology among New Zealand librarians. Three key conclusions are made. Some librarians in New Zealand during the 1920s and 1930s saw censorship as part of their role. There was tension between a public expectation that entertaining fiction should be provided by the public library and the librarian's belief that the public library's primary purpose was education and cultural advancement. Although there was some opposition to librarians as censors, New Zealand librarianship had not yet advanced towards a definite understanding that the public library should be for all. This is evidence that New Zealand librarianship was developing in much the same way as its British and American counterparts, who at this time were also negotiating the librarian's role in selection and censorship issues.

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  • New Zealand Trade Marks Act 2002 and it's References to Māori : a critical discussion

    Rustler, Marie-Christine (2005)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    New Zealand established the Trade Marks Act 2002 to meet the substantial changes in trade mark matters over the past 50 years. Particular focus was placed on improving the protection of trade mark rights for business and economic interests. As Māori groups' concerns regarding the former Trade Marks Act intensified, the Governments also began extensive consultation of Māori, revealing the dilemma for Maori cultural property when forced under Western-oriented trade mark law systems. This research paper analyses the new Act with respect to its references to Māori. It focuses on the unique sections 17(1 )(b)(ii) and 177 to 180 and the Governments' aims and intentions that underpin these regulations. Analysis of the paper aims to show the meaning of the law in trade mark practice, with regard to Māori and business people. The paper is based on the thesis that the Act is dishonest legislation. It argues that the Government presented the law as a significant improvement in all relevant matters; in particular, as law that for the first time provides Māori knowledge and cultural heritage with legal protection. It is shown, however, that the Act neither provides business/economic interests, nor Māori with satisfying law. The paper concludes that the Governments were not interested in revealing their actual intentions in trade mark matters. The Governments' political interests did not allow them to exclusively focus on business and economic interests. Therefore, the Governments introduced a few Māori regulations.

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  • Effects of constant incubation regimes on eggs and hatchlings of the egg-laying skink, Oligosoma suteri

    Hare, Kelly Maree (2001)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The conditions under which reptilian eggs are incubated affect survival probability and physiological attributes of the progeny. The egg-laying skink, Oligosoma suteri, is the only endemic oviparous lizard in New Zealand. No controlled laboratory incubation had previously been undertaken, and thus no information was available on the requirements for successful captive incubation. I studied the effects of incubation regime on the eggs and hatchlings of O. suteri to four months of age. Oligosoma suteri eggs (n = 174) were randomly distributed among three constant incubation temperatures (18°C, 22°C and 26°C) and two water potentials (-120 kPa and -270 kPa). Hatching success and hatchling survival were greatest at 22°C and 26°C, with hatchlings from 18°C incubation suffering from physical abnormalities. Incubation regime and maternal influence did not affect sex of individuals, with equal sex ratios occurring from each incubation treatment. Hatchlings from the 22°C and -120 kPa incubation treatments were larger, for most measurements, and warmer incubation temperatures resulted in increased growth rates. Juveniles from 22°C and 26°C and individuals with greater mass per unit length (condition index) sprinted faster over 0.25 m. Sprint speed was positively correlated with ambient temperature. At four months of age sprint speed decreased in 18°C individuals and individuals incubated at 26°C and -270 kPa compared to their performance at one month. The results suggest that the most successful captive incubation regime for O. suteri is 22°C and -120 kPa. This study also shows that temperature-dependent sex determination does not occur in O. suteri, but that fitness traits are influenced by incubation temperature.

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  • Policy formulation in Malawi : case of police reform 1995-2000

    Luhanga, Ivy Jullie (2001)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper reviews the process of policy formulation in Malawi with particular reference to police reform between 1995 and 2000. After a long period of one party government, Malawi from 1994 made the transition to a multiparty parliamentary democracy. The Malawi Police is an important institution in the new regime. Within the frameworks of interest group theory and stakeholder theory the paper explores the way in which various interests influenced the reform of the police organization and management from 1995 to 2000. Reviews were undertaken of the literature on the policy process and the scholarly writing on interest group and stakeholder theory. Field research was carried out in the public documentation available in Malawi and by face to face interviews with senior officials and other participants in the reform process. The findings confirmed the utility of both interest group and stakeholder theory in explaining how public policies are formulated.

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  • Constructing childhood for children : an analysis of 1970s award-winning children's literature from the Children's Model Collection at Auckland City Libraries

    Baker, Sanya Karen (2004)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Childhood is not simply a personal experience of an individual human in their early years of life. It is also a social construct which governs the way a society treats its youngest members – if they are considered to be members yet at all. Children’s literature is an acknowledged source of information about the ideologies adults have both intentionally and unintentionally offered children to help them understand the world and their place in it. This research involved both content analysis and discourse analysis of award-winning children’s books from the 1970s, which form part of the Children’s Model Collection held at Auckland City Libraries. These books, considered by local librarians to be ‘model literature’ for New Zealand children to read, were used as a window onto the constructions of childhood in this society at that time. Traditional children’s literature in English supported particular relations of domination through certain ‘institutions’ of childhood – family, friendship, gender, race and religion. The 1970s books also imparted ideologies through these institutions along with themes of land, coming of age and war; all interacting under a humanistic umbrella. Through their treatment of these themes or ‘institutions’, texts in this sample often deliberately challenged traditional relations of domination – with varied levels of success. Children were constructed as leaders in waiting, the hope for the future; a future where tolerance and respect would overcome prejudice, thinking for one’s self would replace conformity and the individual could be the best they could be. However, underlying linguistic mechanisms and ideologies transformed many of these texts into conservators of the very relationships they were intending to change. The methods of analysis used in this project were successful in locating the ideologies in books created for young people and revealing the degree to which these are agents of their time. These methods then are both eminently suitable for future research and would be a valuable addition to the multi-literacies with which we equip young people

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  • How could family group conferences be used as decision-making forum for custody and access decisions under the Guardianship Act 1968?

    Aeschlimann, Sabine. (2001)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Recognising prisoner's rights : the physical treatment of prisoners in New Zealand

    Berry, Fiona. (2001)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • From Hawke to Rekohu : an analysis of the recommendations of the Waitangi Tribunal

    Becher, Natalie. (2001)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Redundancy post Employment Contracts Act 1991 : an analysis of the effect of the Employment Relations Act 2000 on redundancy law

    Ballara, Guido. (2001)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Privacy and the Internet : how to rescue the fly from the tangled web?

    Alderdice, Joanna. (2000)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Digital rights management : a promising and threatening tool to protect copyright in the digital era : an international perspective

    Bennek, Marco. (2003)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Does the sentence of preventive detention in New Zealand infringe the human rights of dangerous offenders?

    Bostedt, Frederic Pierre. (2003)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Employment dispute resolution by mediation : does good faith apply?

    Borchardt, Anja. (2003)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Freedom of expression and privacy : an appropriate balance?

    Bennett, Nicola Jean. (2008)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Efficacy of the Broadcasting Standards Authority in determining privacy complaints

    Baber, Catherine Hannah. (2000)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • The Press Council : is it an effective control on New Zealand print media

    Basile, Janine Alexandria. (2000)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Under the spotlight : private lives of public people in Germany and New Zealand

    Bellitto-Grillo, Massimo. (2009)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Impact of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act on the freedom of expression before the Courts

    Becker, JöRg Karsten. (2005)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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