6,708 results for Scholarly text

  • Critical Friend Korero -925

    McGlashan, Alison (2010)

    Scholarly text
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • How Climate Change is Dividing the Global Environmental Community (Invited Contribution to the Routledge Sustainability Hub)

    Neef, Andreas (2014)

    Scholarly text
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Knowing Receipt in the Torrens Context.

    Toy, Alan (2006)

    Scholarly text
    The University of Auckland Library

    There has long been a tension between indefeasibility and liability in personam. Because liability in personam provides a means for the knowledge of a registered proprietor to be relevant to their liability even in the absence of statutory fraud, this diminishes the principle of indefeasibility. This situation is exacerbated by recent decisions that seek to align recipient liability with the principle of unjust enrichment.

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  • A Decolonial Turn in Anthropology? A View from the Pacific

    Uperesa, Fa'anofo (2016-06-07)

    Scholarly text
    The University of Auckland Library

    Edited by Carole McGranahan and Uzma Z. Rizvi. Part 6 of 20 in the Decolonizing Anthropology series.

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  • Artefacts of Encounter: a collaborative project at Cambridge University Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology

    Hogsden, C; Lythberg, Billie (2013)

    Scholarly text
    The University of Auckland Library

    Artefacts of Encounter was a 3-year project (April 2010 ??? March 2013) that located and examined artefacts collected on more than 40 voyages that entered Polynesia between 1765-1840, and used these artefacts as primary evidence of the nature and legacy of encounters between European explorers and Pacific islanders. A key project aim was to develop a way to collaborate with institutions holding artefacts, and the communities from whom these originated, via a digital platform. Our collaboration with Maori arts group Toi Hauiti was intended to initiate a reciprocal platform for co-creation around objects, providing access and authorship at a local level whilst simultaneously sharing information amongst project partners.

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  • Sorry to say, but pilots’ decisions were not irrational

    Perezgonzalez, JD (2016-12-16)

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    Fradera’s Digest (2016) makes for interesting reading both for aviators and cognitive psychologists alike. Fradera reports on a research article by Walmsley and Gilbey (2016) and the Digest seems pretty accurate to the contents commented upon (in a way, thus, whatever praises or criticisms are raised apply equally to the latter article). The Digest is interesting because what it says is quite relevant in principle but rather misleading in practice. That is, the actual results reported by Walmsley and Gilbey, do not seem to support the portrayal of pilots as biased and irrational, a portrayal which originates in the interpretation of those results based on a flawed statistical technique—null hypothesis significance testing, or NHST. In a nutshell, Fradera opted to summarize the interpretation of (some) outputs made by Walmsley and Gilbey instead of re-interpreting those outputs anew within the context of the methodology and the results described in the original article, as I shall argue.

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  • The fallacy of placing confidence in confidence intervals – A commentary

    Perezgonzalez, JD

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    ‘The fallacy of placing confidence in confidence intervals’ (Morey et al., 2016, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, doi: 10.3758/s13423-015-0947-8) delved into a much needed technical and philosophical dissertation regarding the differences between typical (mis)interpretations of frequentist confidence intervals and the typical correct interpretation of Bayesian credible intervals. My contribution here partly strengthens the authors’ argument, partly closes some gaps they left open, and concludes with a note of attention to the possibility that there may be distinctions without real practical differences in the ultimate use of estimation by intervals, namely when assuming a common ground of uninformative priors and intervals as ranges of values instead of as posterior distributions per se.

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  • John Banas profile

    Botes, K

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    A short profile of NZ writer and actor, John Banas, researched and written for NZ On Screen.

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  • Tim Prebble Profile, NZ On Screen

    Botes, K

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    A profile of sound designer and composer, Tim Prebble, researched and written for NZ On Screen.

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  • Latent Room: A photographer's response

    McQuarrie, CL

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

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  • Open letter to The Independent - Pilots 'very likely' to misjudge flying conditions due to irrational decisions, revisited

    Perezgonzalez, JD

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    Staufenberg’s news article (2016) comments on research reported by Walmsley and Gilbey (2016). An interview with the corresponding author also yielded extra information, especially the verbalization that practically all pilots fell prey to cognitive biases and the hint that pilots were making irrational decisions.In reality, Walmsley and Gilbey’s own results do not support much of the conclusions posed. I have further expanded on information which is specific to Staufenberg’s news article, especially information about minima meteorological conditions for visual flight rules (VFR) flying in the UK, as well as a breakdown of the percentage of pilots in Walmsley and Gilbey’s study which contradicts the information provided.

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  • Playing the Anzac Card

    Muriwai, EM

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    If dollars talk, Anzac is shouting from the roof whilst Waitangi sits quietly on the floor. In New Zealand, people are generally familiar with the key differences between two of the nation’s biggest commemorative days. We start the year with the challenging, ‘radical’ politics of Waitangi Day on February 6th and a few months later we join in with the sombre demands of Anzac Day come April 25th. As our project has uncovered, the media does most of the storytelling on these days and their versions of events come without any accountability for privileging the experiences and emotions of one of these days over the other. Through our research, we have been exploring the choreography of the days and the influence different people, social norms and practices have in perpetuating the importance attached to both of these days. There is no denying that both days symbolise loss and coming together for different people across Aotearoa. While we agree that both days solidify important events in New Zealand history, we wanted to investigate why such strong and different emotions were attached to these days. This led me to wonder if Government funding of events on these days might play a role in maintaining these differences.

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  • Position Statement: Giftedness in the early years

    White, VK; Dean, J; Delaune, A

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    This position paper has been developed by giftEDnz, the professional association for gifted education to promote evidence-based practice in the early years in supporting gifted and talented children in the early years (age birth - 8 years old).

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  • Failings in COPE's guidelines to editors, and recommendations for improvement.

    Perezgonzalez, JD

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    Letter highlighting failings in COPE's Guidelines to editors and proposing recommendations for improvement. The main recommendation is to create appropriate guidelines for dealing with fully disclosed (potential) conflicts of interest. COPE sought the topic as relevant and included a session on the topic as part of COPE's Forum (Feb 3, 2017; http://publicationethics.org/forum-discussion-topic-comments-please-7).

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  • Statistical Sensitiveness for the Behavioral Sciences

    Perezgonzalez, JD

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    Research often necessitates of samples, yet obtaining large enough samples is not always possible. When it is, the researcher may use one of two methods for deciding upon the required sample size: rules-of-thumb, quick yet uncertain, and estimations for power, mathematically precise yet with the potential to overestimate or underestimate sample sizes when effect sizes are unknown. Misestimated sample sizes have negative repercussions in the form of increased costs, abandoned projects or abandoned publication of non-significant results. Here I describe a procedure for estimating sample sizes adequate for the testing approach which is most common in the behavioural, social, and biomedical sciences, that of Fisher’s tests of significance. The procedure focuses on a desired minimum effect size for the research at hand and finds the minimum sample size required for capturing such effect size as a statistically significant result. In a similar fashion than power analyses, sensitiveness analyses can also be extended to finding the minimum effect for a given sample size a priori as well as to calculating sensitiveness a posteriori. The article provides a full tutorial for carrying out a sensitiveness analysis, as well as empirical support via simulation.

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  • John Key quits while he’s ahead

    Duncan, G

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    John Key quits while he’s ahead – so what’s next for New Zealand politics?

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  • Social work education, curriculum mapping and educational taxonomies

    Ballantyne, N; Beddoe, L; Hay, KS; Maidment, J; Walker, S

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    This literature scan is written to support the first phase of enhance R2P: an Ako Aotearoa funded project focused on developing a professional capabilities framework to clarify the capabilities of newly qualified social workers (NQSWs) and social workers at experienced and advanced levels of practice. The first phase of the project is designed to answer the following question: what is the content of the current New Zealand social work curriculum and how does it relate to the core competencies of the Social Workers’ Registration Board (SWRB)? This literature scan is written for the research team, our project participants and the wider stakeholder community of interest. Its aims are twofold: to introduce social work education in Aotearoa New Zealand and to explore the rationale for two aspects of our proposed methodology - curriculum mapping and the development of a taxonomy of Terms for Indexing Social Work Education in Aotearoa New Zealand (TISWEANZ).

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  • What will the long term impact of the Cabinet Manual be? Developments in New Zealand may hold the answer

    Duncan, G

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    Gordon Brown introduced the Cabinet Manual in 2011 in advance of what looked set to be a coalition or minority government in order to clarify the operation of government at a time when conventions and unwritten rules looked to be insufficient. The Cabinet Secretary at the time, Gus O’Donnell, who drew the document up, took inspiration from New Zealand – a country with similar politics and which also lacks a formal written constitution. Here, Grant Duncan describes the evolution of New Zealand politics since their cabinet manual came into force.

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  • Don't Let Diplomacy Down

    Amerian, S

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    Published online

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  • Retract 0.005 and propose using JASP, instead

    Perezgonzalez, JD; Frias-Navarro, D

    Scholarly text
    Massey University

    Seeking to address the lack of research reproducibility, Benjamin et al. propose a pragmatic solution: use a stricter 0.005 standard for statistical significance when claiming evidence of new discoveries. Notwithstanding its potential impact, the proposal has motivated a large mass of authors to dispute it. In reality, a simpler and better suited alternative proposal exists, perhaps the only one the authors could be entitled to make from their Jeffresian perspective: Use JASP, the stand-alone, free-to-download, R-based statistical software with user-friendly GUI for learning more about your error statistics and your beliefs.

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