16 results for Thesis, 1930

  • A history of the political labour movement in New Zealand, 1850-1913

    Robinson, K.W. (1937)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    A typically modern trend in democratic countries has been the entry of labour representatives into the political arena. New Zealand has proved no exception to the rule, but the history of her own labour movement, particularly in its earlier years, is still rather disconnected in the eyes of the general public. This thesis therefore attempts to recount the origins of that movement with the object of presenting a clearer idea of the nature of the beginnings of the party which constitutes the present government. It was at first intended to write of the Labour Party in later years, but preliminary investigation was sufficient to show that no such treatment could be adequate without a knowledge of the origins of the Party. Further investigation showed those origins to be worthy of separate study in themselves, and the history of the Labour Party is therefore left for other pens to write. The aim throughout has been to trace, not a party, but a movement, and to discover how much that movement was influenced by contemporary events and how much it was a natural and inevitable development. A thorough study of the subject, giving an exhaustive survey of opinions and incidents, individuals and groups in every centre of population, would have required intensive and prolonged research which the writer was not in a position to carry out. The extra work would doubtless have made the history more comprehensive, but it is certain that the general conclusions arrived at would not have been modified seriously. Newspapers are generally regarded as an unreliable source of evidence, but in this case exception can perhaps be claimed for making extensive use of one paper, since it gave expression to working-class opinions without displaying the fanaticism of purely labour publications. Thanks are due to the Central Office of the Labour Party in Wellington for the courtesy of the officials in placing material at my disposal. It is unfortunate that some of this material, which may have been of considerable value, went astray in the post, and was not traced. Thanks must also be expressed to the Hon. John Rigg, who was helpful in supplying newspaper cuttings and reminiscences dealing with the Political Labour League, and to Mr. E.J. Howard, M.P. for valuable advice. In some cases likely people who were approached, while showing keen interest, seemed unable to rely on their memories for anything definite; one supplied suggestions which were of no use; another, from whom much was expected, did not reply at all. During the whole period of research what impressed one most was the dearth of published material on the subject and the scant attention paid to the movement in general in comprehensive works. This made the task of constructing general outlines as a basis for work very difficult. The investigation has suggested that the early organised labour parties in New Zealand were striving not so much for something they did not possess as to maintain certain privileges which they felt were slipping from their grasp. Their aim appears to have been not so much an emancipation from the present as a safeguard for the future. This, at least, is apparent to the mind of the writer, and it is hoped that his efforts may be of some use in clearing the mist which shrouds the infancy of labour in this country.

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  • A study of eighty New Zealand dietaries

    Jackson, Phyllis Rosalind (1937)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    78 leaves :ill., ports. ; 31 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leave 72-78). University of Otago faculty : Home Science

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  • Introductory work for the standardisation and preparation of local norms for Burt's spelling tests.

    Mack, Charles Wilbur (1938)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    121, [20] leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Education. Typescript. At head of title: Thesis for honours and M.A. in education.

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  • The Chinese in New Zealand

    Moore, Margaret Jean McNeur (1930)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    146 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • The military defence of New Zealand, 1850-1914

    Borrie, Wilfred David (1936)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 104 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript.

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  • Thesis on the Briseis Mine, Derby, Tasmania.

    Alexander, J. M. (1936)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    194 [1] leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaf 192-[195] University of Otago department: Mineral Technology.

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  • The life and work of Charles Henry Kettle.

    Martin, Marguerite Jopp (1934)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    363 p. :ill. (some col.), chart, map ; 30 cm. Includes bibliography.

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  • A study of fifty New Zealand family dietaries

    Chalmers, Enid Charlotte (1936)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 84 leaves :col. ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago faculty: Home Science.

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  • A thesis on the property of the Blackwater Mines Ltd., Waiuta.

    Jones, Lloyd Samuel (1938)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    45 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago : Otago School of Mines

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  • Contributions of Germans and Scandinavians to the history of New Zealand.

    Charlton, Frank Alan (1935)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xiv, 171 leaves :col. ill., col. maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Thesis on the Blackwater Mine, Reefton District, New Zealand.

    Service, Harold (1934)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    79 leaves, [32] leaves of plates (some folded) :ill. ; 27 cm. Univeristy of Otago : Otago School of Mines. 2 diagrams in pocket.

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  • Te Puoho and his South Island raid : or, from Taranaki to Tuturau.

    Ross, Angus (1933)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    ix, 95 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Dr. Edward Shortland and his work in northern New Zealand, 1841 to 1847.

    Campbell, George Hunter (1935)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    139 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • The history of railway unionism in New Zealand until the passing of the "Government Railways Superannuation Fund Act" 1902

    Roscoe, Shona Alice (1937)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The industrial legislation of the present Labour Government of New Zealand has had the effect both of increasing the numerical strength of existent unions and of simulating the foundation of new ones in previously unorganised vocations. Some students of economic problems in the Dominion seek a solution in a properly directed development of trade union. Indeed, from the earliest days of settlement New Zealand, the workers have been influenced by the trade union principles, which they brought with them from the Mother Country. It has, however, not been true to say that New Zealand has been ruled by trade union enthusiasts or principles. This seeming paradox can be explained when one realises that even today New Zealand is not a highly industrialised country; therefore the chief stimulus to trade union organisation has been lacking. I have endeavoured to show, in passing, how greatly the Industrial Revolution and all that it involved affected labour problems in England. Conditions in New Zealand have not been identical and therefore the developments have been different. Nevertheless, the New Zealand working man has been influenced by developments in the trade union world in England and elsewhere. New Zealand unions have developed on new lines in a new country, from a starting point, which was the result of centuries of slow growth in an older land. The railway servants have made up an important section of the working population of the Dominion. The railway system and its management has always been a subject of the utmost importance to New Zealanders. So much has depended on the system of communications and transport of which, through the greater part of the Dominion’s history, the railways have possessed the monopoly. The chief railway lines have been, from the date of their construction, the property of the State; except for two periods, when the control was in the hands of almost irresponsible boards, management was through Ministers of Public Works and of Railways. Any major question of railway control and management has been decided upon in Parliament. Public interest in railway affairs, more especially in the days of construction, was a lively one. When members of the staff attempted to organise trade unions, news-paper battles raged quite fiercely over the colony. Opponents of state control and of unionism foretold inevitable anarchy as the result of the existence of unions of railwaymen. With new conditions opinions changed. By 1890, when a Government with a progressive programme of economic and social legislation was elected, the right of railwaymen, as of other workers, to combine to secure a decent standard of life, was generally recognised.

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  • The economic life of the present-day Māori.

    Jansen, Elwyn George (1935)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Summary: In order to gather material and to fit himself generally for the writing of this thesis, the writer, in company with a companion, devoted a portion of the Summer Vacation to an extended tour of the Māori field. Time did not permit of a visit to the North Auckland Peninsula, but with this exception, a complete circuit of the North Island was made. Visits to different parts of the South Island field had been made at an earlier date and had brought forth valuable experience in methods of approach and in the kind of enquiries that should be pursued. Letters of introduction were secured from Officials of the Native Department in Wellington, and from other Māori leaders, to prominent local personalities at different points in the journey. Under the sponsoring of such local leaders, avenues of enquiry were opened up that would otherwise have been closed. Care was taken, however, not to see only those things to which the leaders directed our attention. We travelled by car and carried camping equipment, so that it was possible to pause where inclination prompted. Many nooks and corners were thereby investigated. Living conditions, attempts at farming, the lately-instituted Land-development Schemes, and the Māori at work and at play, were all seen at first hand. Such observations were supplemented by interviews and casual conversations with scores of people, both Māori and European, in all walks of life:- Officials of Māori Land Boards, County Clerks, School Teachers, Medical men, Clergymen, Lawyers, Policemen, Storekeepers, Hotel Proprietors, Picture Theatre Managers of Dairy Factories, Farmers of all grades, labourers, tramps and many other such. From the wealth of material gathered, selection and elimination, for the purpose of keeping the thesis within reasonable bounds, have been difficult processes. The principle adopted has been to include such material as was calculated to give the most representative presentation of the whole Māori field. The tour has been valuable more in the way it has brought an appreciation of general trends than in the provision of exact information. Exact quantitative material has been gleaned largely from other sources - mostly from official publications and from direct correspondence with Government Departments. The contribution of the tour lies in the way it has illuminated all subsequent reading on the subject and in the way it has provided both general conclusions for enunciation and concrete examples with which to back them up.

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  • The Poverty Bay massacre of 1868

    Black, Marjorie Edith Stuart (1935)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Digital copy stored under Section 55 of the NZ Copyright Act.

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