20 results for Thesis, 1950

  • The improvement of light land under irrigation on the Canterbury Plains

    Moore, John Leslie Neville (1957)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The paradoxes of strict implication

    Bennett, J.F. (1952)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The problem in logic with which the present work is concerned has its roots in the Principia Mathematica of Whitehead and Russell. The authors of that work define 'p implies q' as 'It is not the case that p is true and q is false’, whence arises the conclusion that a true proposition is implied by any proposition and a false proposition implies any proposition. These paradoxical results have met with protest, and C. L. Lewis of Harvard has attempted to supply a definition of 'p implies q' which is adequate to 'implies' as generally understood.

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  • Arteriosclerosis in the lower limbs: a pathological study of fifty cases with no ischaemia

    Rodda, Roland Arnold (1950)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Format: 4 v. : illus., diagrs.

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  • A history of the Canterbury Maoris (Ngaitahu) with special reference to the land question

    Evison, Harry Charles (1952)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Format: 110, xiv leaves ; 27 cm.

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  • Some new Gregarines

    Fitzgerald, Norman W (1952)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    VOLUME 1: Introduction – Techniques – Enterocystis zwetkowi n.sp. : Description; Development; Reproduction; Effect of parasite on the host; Discussion on the genus Enterocystis – Gregarina botulina n.sp. : Description; Development; Reproduction; Movement; Effect of parasite on the host; Staining reactions and microchemistry – Stenophora pinorum n.sp. : Description; Development; Reproduction – A Gregarine of uncertain systematic position – Ophryocystis marplesi n.sp. : Techniques; Historical and generic account; Attached phase; Lumen-dwelling phase – Summary – Acknowledgement – Literature Cited VOLUME 2: Plates

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  • Observations on Filariasis in Western Samoa

    Fitzgerald, Norman W (1955)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    Format: 23 leaves. Illustrated.

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  • The tin mines of the Pahang Consolidated Company Limited.

    Cowie, A. B. (1953)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    73 leaves :ill., facsims. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 71-73. University of Otago department: Mineral Technology.

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  • Soap flotation of calcite with particular reference to the upgrading of Caversham Sandstone

    MacKenzie, James M.W. (1959)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The Caversham sandstone forms a large deposit, several hundred feet thick extending over an area of the East coast of the Dunedin district. It is also found outcropping in the Lookout Point area. The high carbonate content of the deposit (40 - 65%) has caused attention to be focussed on the sandstone as a possible source of calcium carbonate. Some time prior to 1865 calcination was attempted in a sandstone quarry near the Kaikorai Valley while in 1865 specimens containing up to 68% carbonate were reported(20). The favourable location of the deposit in relation to the Milburn Lime and Cement Company's cement works at Burnside make it of economic interest to this Company as a potential raw material for cement manufacture. Before the sandstone could be used for this purpose considerable upgrading of the carbonate content would be necessary and modifications to its natural mineral content would be desirable. The two possible methods of doing this are: ( 1) to lightly grind the sandstone and size it to determine whether any of the constituents concentrate in particular size fractions (2) to float the carbonates with an anionic collector and modify the silicate, and perhaps the iron distribution, with a cationic collector. Froth flotation is widely used to produce cement raw materials of the correct chemical composition (2) and in all cases fatty acids or their derivatives are used as anionic collectors. This thesis attempts to explain the action of the more important fatty acids as collectors for calcite and to show how these reagents act as collectors for the carbonate minerals of the Caversham sandstone.

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  • The ports of Otago & Bluff : a geographic comparison and contrast

    Farrant, Alfred E (1952)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Geography seeks to describe places or areas as entities in themselves as well as in their relations to other places or areas. The complex interaction of Physical and Cultural features combining in varied ways to form dynamic functioning units can be more clearly understood and some clue can be gained as to the causes of differences by arriving at an areal differentiation. The essential geographic character of any place is made more distinctive when it is compared or contrasted with that of any other place. This study in economic geography seeks to describe and in part, account for the character of two ports in the South Island of New Zealand. It is believed that such a comparative account which compares and contrasts the differential character of the ports, thereby gives a fuller understanding of the separate character of each port and its tributary areas, than if the ports are studied separately. Important factors are emphasised when there are contrasts between places, while similarities between them frequently serve to show that they do not necessarily lead to, or are derived from, similar circumstances. Furthermore places do not in fact exist in isolation. They have reciprocal relations with other places and areas. This is undoubtably true of ports wherever they are situated, but especially where adjacent ports such as the Ports of Otago and Bluff serve a common area. There are no insurmountable physical barriers between the ports, and the effects of history, invention, politics, customs and economics are invoked to illustrate how complexes of all or some of these factors have interacted with the physical features of the landscape to give these ports their distinctive present day characters. The economy of New Zealand is directed towards the overseas marketing of a pastoral surplus. This study seeks to show how dependent upon the maintenance of a regular flow of trade are the rural and urban areas of the portion of New Zealand served by these ports. The motto of the Otago Harbour Board, “By Ships We Live”, succinctly describes this situation.

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  • The structure and stereochemistry of the diterpenes and the glycoalkaloid from solanum nigrum

    Davis, Brian Reeve (1957)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    The diterpenoids are fairly widely distributed in nature. The best known members are the resin acids obtained from the non-volatile portion of many oleoresins, especially those obtained fram conifers. Diteppenoid acids, alcohols, lactones, phenols, and alkaloids have been obtained from a variety of sources. The hydrocarbons are more restricted in occurrence; all are found in New Zealand and all but two (camphorene and cupressene) in endemic species. Their reported occurrences are almost solely limited to countries bordering on the Pacific.

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  • The crystal structure of acetamidoxime

    Claridge, G. G. C. (1955)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    The chemistry of the amidoximes (a) has long been of interest because of the possibility of tautomerism with hyroxyamidines (b)

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  • The crystal structures of the bromo and chloro derivatives of picrotoxinin / Bryan Maxwell Craven

    Craven, Bryan Maxwell (1957)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Picrotoxin is the bitter tasting convulsive poison, obtained from the cocculus berries, the fruit of the East Indian creepers, Menispermum cocculus and Anamirta paniculata. It has been used extensively in medicine as anti-barbiturate. Although picrotoxin was first isolated in 1812 by Boullay and has been the subject of exhaustive research since then, the problem of its structure is still incompletely solved.

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  • The Origins of the Maori wars of the Eighteen Sixties

    Sinclair, Keith (1954)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A thesis presented to the University of New Zealand for the Doctor of Science

    Green, Rowland Alfred Weldon (1953)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The colour isomerism and structure of some copper co-ordination compounds / T.N.M. Waters

    Waters, Thomas Neil Morris (1957)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Following the classical work of Werner whose co-ordination theory provided the first rational foundation for the study of transition metal complexes, chemists have endeavoured to discover the underlying principles involved in these compounds. Thus, while Werner noticed the directional property of the bonds between metal and ligand, it was not until Pauling (1931) and others were able to apply a wave mechanical treatment, that an explanation for the rigid stereochemical requirements of the metal was found. With this growth in fundamental knowledge the interpretation and use of the physical properties of complex compounds has become possible. For example, the magnetic susceptibility has been related to the electronic configuration of the metal atom, (Pauling loc. cit.) enabling predictions to be made about the type of metal-ligand bond.

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  • Time variations in cosmic ray extensive air showers.

    Storey, John Richard (1957)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Two motives are responsible for the investigation of cosmic rays. Firstly they provide the only source at present availabe of particles with extremely high energy. To study interactions between fundamental particles at energies greater than about 6 x 109 ev. therefore, one must turn to cosmic rays. Interest in geophysics and astrophysics provides the other motive. For example, a theory of the origin of cosmic rays must form an integral part of the astronomer's explnation of the universe. The prob1em of the origin of the cosmic radiation is still looking at satisfactory solution. Further, much information about the physics of the solar system and the earth may be obtained from a world wide distribution of cosmic ray observatories.

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  • A study of coordination compounds of nickel with some diamines.

    Curtis, Neil Ferguson (1954)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    The coordination compounds of many transition metals can exist in two form with differing magnetic moments. As the paramagnetic susceptibility arises largely from the unpaired electrons present in the molecule, this means that the two classes of compound for any metal must have differing numbers of unpaired electrons. The first satisfactory explanation of the differing magnetic moments was given by Pauling who suggested that there were two fundamentally different types of coordination compound.

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  • A study of some of the factors concerned in the natural regeneration of the kauri (Agathis australis)

    Mirams, Rex Valentine, 1925- (1951)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    New Zealand is a land with a unique and very diversified flora which, along with the great range of habitats to be found throughout the country, has given rise to some remarkable plant communities. As a result of a considerable volume of ecological research, mainly by the efforts of Cockayne, our plant associations are well known and delimited. There have, however, been few detailed analyses of their structure and of the factors operating in any of them, Cockayne's work being primarily descriptive. From the developmental point of view the general life-history of the Kauri forest has been known for many years, but nothing more detailed is known about the changes occuring. It is for the above reason that an attempt has been made in the present research to try and elucidate some of these factors while there are still considerable areas of Kauri forest in a more or less untouched state.

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  • The geology of the Maungatautari area, south-east of Cambridge, New Zealand

    Olson, Olaf Patrick (1950)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Geology of Waiheke Island

    Nicholson, Heather (1953)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Waiheke Island, the largest of the group of islands lying to the east of Auckland City, is 12 miles long from east to west, and in width varies from 2/5 mile to 6 miles. The island has an area of 36 square miles'and its coastline is approximately 83 miles long. The port of Matiatia at the western end is 12 miles east of Auckland City, and the eastern end is about 15 miles from Coromandel. To the south east lie the smaller islands of Pakatoa, Rotoroa, Ponui and Pakihi: to the west and north lie Motuihi, Rangitoto, Motutapu, Rakino and The Noisies.

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