90 results for Thesis, 1960

  • The development of Otago's main road network

    Baker, Neill Reginald (1969)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 112 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geography.

    View record details
  • W. E. Gudgeon : his contribution to the annexation of the Cook Islands.

    Currie, Ernest Rowland (1963)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 90 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaf iv-v.

    View record details
  • Aspects of the biology of some New Zealand echinoderms : feeding, growth and reproduction in the asteroids, Patiriella regularis (Verrill, 1867) and Coscinasterias calamaria (Gray, 1840).

    Crump, Robin (1969)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    192 leaves :illus. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: p.138-147. The author's "The flight response in Struthiolaria papulosa giges Sowerby", reprinted from the New Zealand journal of marine and freshwater research, v.2, no.3, Sept., 1968, in pocket. University of Otago department: Zoology

    View record details
  • Mach's principle in general relativity, and other gravitational theories

    Johnson, David Louthwood (1968)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 292 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 281-289. Typescript. University of Otago department: Mathematics.

    View record details
  • The natural history of autoimmune disorders in mice and its modification by therapy

    Casey, Thomas Patrick (1964)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    3 volumes; illustrations; diagrams. Thesis (M.D.) - University of Otago.

    View record details
  • Trichosurus vulpecula and rattus norvegious in the epidemiology of two arboviruses.

    Dempster, Alexander George (1964)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 70 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

    View record details
  • Some aspects of molybdenum halide chemistry

    Gainsford, G.J. (1969)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Chemical and X-ray crystallographic studies of molybdenum(II) halides, which are based on the well-known (Mo₆Cl₈)⁴⁺ cluster, have been carried out. Contrary to previous reports, the reactions of 2,2'-bipyridyl with the halides (Mo₆Cl₈)Cl₄ and (Mo₆Cl₈)I₄ yield, even under mild conditions, bipyridylium salts of chloromolybdic(II) and iodomolybdic(II) acids respectively: (BipyH)₂((Mo₆Cl₈)X₆) where X = Cl, I and Bipy = 2,2'-bipyridyl. The reactions are complicated by the formation of mixtures of products, which are mainly various crystalline forms of the bipyridylium salts. An amorphous product may be a true mono-bipyridyl complex. An unusual oxidation occurs during the reactions of triphenylphosphine (Ph₃P) and triphenylarsine (Ph₃As) with (Mo₆Cl₈)Cl₄ and (Mo₆Cl₈)I₄. Infra-red spectral and X-ray powder photographic studies show that the oxidized ligand complexes, (Mo₆Cl₈)X₄(Ph₃Z0)₂ (X = Cl, I; Z = As,P), are formed except under conditions in which both molecular and chemically-bound oxygen is rigorously excluded. The conditions required to coordinate more than two neutral unidentate ligands to the (Mo₆Cl₈)⁴⁺ cluster have been examined. It proved possible to obtain new ionic complexes under a range of conditions. The six-fold coordination of the (Mo₆Cl₈)⁴⁺ cluster is maintained in these compounds (e.g. ((Mo₆Cl₈)I₃(triphenylphosphine oxide)₂(pyridine))⁺I⁻) by the ionization of one or more of the terminal halogen atoms in the molybdenum(II) halide starting material (e.g.(Mo₆Cl₈)I₄). The X-ray single crystal structures of two isomorphous salts, (BipyH)₂(( (Mo₆Cl₈)X₆) (X = Cl,I), have been solved using the difference Patterson method. To solve another crystalline modification of the chloro-salt, the (Mo₆Cl₈) cluster was constrained to its established geometry with its centroid fixed at the origin of the unit cell. This rigid group of atoms was then rotated by the least-squares refinement of the three orientation-defining angles. The three structures contain discrete ((Mo₆Cl₈)X₆)²⁻(X = Cl,I) and (C₁₀H₉N₂)⁺ (bipyridylium) ions. The anions consist of highly-symmetric (Mo₆Cl₈) clusters (Mo-Mo = 2.606, Mo-Cl = 2.48 Ao), with six terminal halogen atoms (X) bound by single covalent bonds to the molybdenum atoms (Mo-Cl = 2.423, Mo-I = 2.737 Ao). The bipyridylium cations are twisted from perfect cis conformations in all three structures. The average dihedral angle between the two rings is 13 degrees. Further details of the geometries of the anion and cation are discussed. The ionic packing in the three crystals is dominated by the bulky anions. These are arranged in expanded "hexagonal close-packed" layers with the cations centred on approximately trigonal holes in this array. The two crystalline modifications of the chloro-salt differ in the orientation of the bipyridylium cations in these layers.

    View record details
  • Uranium luminescence

    Nicholas, J.V. (1966)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    View record details
  • Lower ionospheric irregularities

    Vincent, R.A. (1967)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis is a study of the structure of that part of the ionosphere lying between 60 and 120 km. In the usual terminology the ionized parts of the atmosphere in this altitude range are called the ionospheric D and E regions, the boundary between them occurring at a height of 90 km. Above this height the E region extends upwards to 140 km, the base of the F region. Since the ionization below 50 km is not enough to effect the propagation or radio waves this height effectively marks the bottom of the D region. There is also another system of nomenclature based on the neutral gas temperatures of the atmosphere. The mesosphere lies in the altitude range 50 to 85 km, which is a region of decreasing temperature with height. Because they refer to the same height range the terms mesosphere and D region are often used synonymously in the following work. Above 90 km the temperature increases, rapidly at first and then more slowly, in the thermosphere.

    View record details
  • Studies in the solid state : optical spectra of IrCl62- and PtCl62- complexes

    Douglas, I.N. (1969)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The optical absorption spectra of the complexes IrCl62- and PtCl62- in single crystals of Cs2ZrCl6, Cs2HfCl6 and K2SnCl6, and PdCl62- in Cs2ZrCl6 have been studied at liquid helium temperature. Both molecular orbital theory and ligand field theory are used to interpret the results. The rich vibrational structure observed in many of the bands is analysed in terms of the vibrational modes of the complexes. Several long progressions involving up to twelve quanta of the totally symmetric vibration, ylg, were observed throughout the spectra, indicating that the transitions are to states in which the bond length has changed. Luminescent bands due to transitions from the triplet states of the 5d6 configuration of Pt4+ in crystals of the type K2PtCl6 have been found in the red and green regions of the spectrum. A study of the temperature dependence of the band width of the red luminescence in K2PtCl6 powder has been made and fitted to a coth function. At liquid helium temperature both bands showed vibrational progressions, involving several quanta of the totally symmetric vibration.

    View record details
  • The geomorphology of the Kawarau gorge

    Stroud, Alastair Thomas (1968)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Interloan access to Geology theses must first be approved by the Geology Department. Format: x, 100, xi-xv leaves : illus., maps (1 in pocket) ; 26 cm.

    View record details
  • The geology of an area surrounding Hyde, Central Otago

    MacPherson, James Malcolm (1969)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    Interloan access to Geology theses must first be approved by the Geology Department. Format: ix, 87 leaves : illus., fold. maps (in pockets) ; 28 cm.

    View record details
  • Some aspects of prostatic cytology

    Fitzgerald, Norman W (1961)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Format: 2 v.: illustrations.

    View record details
  • The Hakataramea valley : a reconnaissance survey.

    Cant, Louise Rhoda (1967)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 217 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geography. Maps: Geological map of New Zealand, 1:250,000, sheet 23, Oamaru; and New Zealand, 1:63,360, sheet S118, Hakataramea.

    View record details
  • Structural analysis in the middle Shotover valley, North West Otago

    Barry, John Michael (1966)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Interloan access to Geology theses must first be approved by the Geology Department. Description: vii, 95 leaves : illus., diagrs., map (in pocket) ; 27 cm. Notes: University of Otago department: Geology. Bibliography: p. 79-85.

    View record details
  • Sir Arthur Hamilton-Gordon - Governor of New Zealand and High Commissioner for the western Pacific, 1880-1882

    Mitchell, Robert Wyndham (1963)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Long essay presented for the degree of Master of Arts in history. The post of Western Pacific High Commissioner established by the Order in Council of 17th. August 1877 continued to exist until 1952, and, except for one short period (1880-82) it was held by the Governor of Fiji. During the period 1880-82 the post was held by the Governor of New Zealand, Sir Arthur Gordon who had previously been the first Governor of Fiji (1875-80) and the first Western Pacific High Commissioner.

    View record details
  • Solid state studies : transition ions in zinc oxide

    Anderson, R.S. (1967)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Furnace control facilities have been developed and crystals of ZnO with Mn, Co, Ni and Cu as impurities grown from a PbF2 flux. Visible spectra of Ni- and Co- ZnO in a variety of concentrations have been taken at temperatures from 1°K to 300°K. Sharp lines have been studied using high resolution to avoid slit effects. Temperature, polarisation and concentration dependence have been analysed to determine the nature of the transitions involved. Trigonal crystal field calculations have been performed to fit the observed electronic levels. Evidence has been found for the assignment of the visible band of Ni - ZnO to two electronic transitions and their phonon sidebands. An extra level, which may be due to some form of Jahn-Teller interaction, has been observed. Several parts of the spectrum show characteristics of a reduction of off-diagonal matrix elements by vibronic coupling. Lines due to pair interactions have been identified on the low energy side of the visible bands in Ni- and Co - ZnO. For Ni - ZnO the interaction cannot be due to spin, which is quenched in the ground state.

    View record details
  • Studies of the upper atmosphere

    Fraser, G.J. (1965)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    In an attempt to make synoptic observations of winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere, a simplified version of the correlation method for analysing spaced receiver ionosphere drift observations was developed. The new method makes possible the use of much simpler recording methods and eliminates the manual reduction of records. Drift observations made at noon between altitudes of 65 and 100 km, for summer 1963-4 and winter 1964 are presented. It is concluded that the mean monthly drift is a good estimate of the winds at these heights. The most prominent feature of the seasonal circulation is the upward progression of the height of reversal from westerlies (below) to easterlies (above) from 80 km in April to 100 km in July. The reversal height falls to 90 km in August and September.

    View record details
  • Solid state studies : Raman spectroscopy and the lattice vibrations of CdCl2 and CdBr2

    Lockwood, D.J. (1969)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The fundamental lattice vibrations of the trigonal CdC12 structure (D3d5 ) have been analyzed group theoretically, and symmetry coordinates have been constructed. The primitive cell has nine normal modes of vibration. All six optical modes are either infrared or Raman active, so a complete vibrational analysis is possible. Results of far-infrared measurements on a Fourier-transform spectrometer together with Raman spectra recorded by argon laser excitation are presented for both CdC12 and CdBr2. Symmetry assignments of the observed frequencies are made on the basis of the shift in frequency in going from chloride to bromide and the polarization behaviour. Peaks in the second-order axial infrared absorption spectra are assigned to allowed fundamental combinations. The lattice frequencies of CdC12 are consistent with those of the isomorphic crystals of CoC12 and MnC1 2, which have also been investigated by infrared absorption. An unsuccessful attempt was made to measure the electronic Raman spectra of Fe2+ and Co2+ ions in CdC12 and CdBr2. The Raman spectra were measured on a Raman system comprising a 5 watt argon laser and a double monochromator, with photoelectric detection. The construction of the Raman spectrometer, and the associated signal processing electronics, is described in detail. Special emphasis has been placed on the use of on-line computer techniques in processing the Raman signal. A signal averaging system has been developed that is superior to both photon counting and lock-in amplification when measuring very weak signals.

    View record details
  • Studies of magnetic micropulsations with special reference to discrete emissions in the vicinity of one cycle per second

    Fraser, B.J. (1965)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The work on magnetic micropulsations described in this thesis falls into two parts. The first part considers micropulsations associated with meteoric phenomena, a high-altitude thermo-nuclear explosion, and man-made electromagnetic interference. In the study on the association of micropulsations with meteors, both the effects of hourly meteor rates and individual meteor occurrences on micropulsation activity in the 1.5 cps band recorded at the same site, are considered. It is found that the variation in hourly meteor rates, plotted through a succession of nights, is not significantly related to the corresponding micropulsation activity. Most individual meteors do not have any associated micropulsation activity, but the number of coincidences is greater than random, and it remains possible that some of the larger meteors do produce magnetic effects. Observations of the magnetic disturbance produced by the July 9, 1962 thermo-nuclear explosion above Johnston Island are described and the characteristic oscillation periods are interpreted. In the second part of the thesis, the development of recording and data analysis instrumentation, suitable for observing the frequency-time properties of signals in the Pc1 band (0.2 - 5 cps), is described and the characteristics of eight months of recorded data are interpreted in order to gain insight into the origin of the discrete Pc1 emissions generally known as pearl-type micropulsations or hydromagnetic emissions. Special attention is given to the design of a galvanometer-photocell preamplifier and it is shown that the frequency response of a standard laboratory galvanometer may be extended, by the application of feedback, to cover a considerable portion of the Pc1 band. The fine structure properties of hydromagnetic emissions are found to be in qualitative agreement with recently suggested theories for emission propagation by hydromagnetic ion cyclotron wave packets in the magnetosphere. Significant diurnal variations in hydromagnetic emission fine structure parameters are established, and it is shown that these are not associated with the daytime attenuation of hydromagnetic waves in the ionosphere, but with the emission source in the magnetosphere. The diurnal variations indicate that the emission source is located near the L=4 field line between 03 - 06 hr LT, and near the L=6.5 field line between 12 - 15 hr LT. The diurnal movement in the emission source position provides a simple explanation for the variation in hydromagnetic emission diurnal occurrence with latitude, and is also consistent with the variation in average emission frequency with latitude. It is suggested that the diurnal movement in the source position may result from the magnetospheric convection of low energy trapped particles. A preliminary analysis of the effects of geomagnetic activity on hydromagnetic emissions shows that the average nighttime location of the emission source is in the vicinity of the L=5 field line on extremely quiet days, and the L=3.7 field line on moderately disturbed days.

    View record details