622 results for Thesis, 1990

  • Interpretation of some Paleocene fluvial sediments from the Upper Pakawau and Kapuni groups, Pakawau Sub-basin, North-West Nelson

    Stark, C.J. (1996)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Fifteen key measured sections form the basis for detailed facies analysis of Paleocene upper North Cape Formation (Pakawau Group) and Farewell Formation (Kapuni Group) sediments, northwest Nelson. Based on structural, textural and compositional variations, the sediments were divided into eight lithofacies associations (LAA3, LAA4, LAA5, LAA6, LAA7, LAB1, LAB2 and LAB3). Associations A3 to A7, North Cape Formation, represent a progradational sequence of floodplain (LAA3), lacustrine (LAA4), low energy meander (LAA5 and LAA6), and braided river deposits (LAA7). LAB1, LAB2 and LAB3 are interpreted as meander, gravel dominated and sand dominated braided systems. The conformable boundary between LAA3 and LAA5 on the northwestern side (Moki Point) of the Whanganui Inlet means the transition from an axial system to system flowing perpendicular to the axis of the Pakawau Sub-basin does not represent the contact between the Kapuni Group and Pakawau Group. Progradation of a fluvial system passing through the space between en echelon faults in the west would explain the paleocurrent change from parallel to perpendicular to the main axis of the Pakawau Sub-basin. A higher rate of subsidence toward the north along the Wakamarama Fault is inferred from a lateral northerly-coarsening trend between LAA6 and LAA7. Erosional contact between LAA6 and LAB2 on the northern side of the Whanganui Inlet is interpreted as the upper contact of the North Cape Formation. The absence of fluvial association LAA5-LAA7 on the southern side of the Whanganui Inlet Entrance suggests a period of uplift and subsequent erosion of prior to the deposition of associations LAB1-LAB3 deposits. The preferred explanation for the localized uplift and erosion of fluvial association A deposits is by activation of intrabasin antithetic and synthetic faults. LAB1 is inferred to represent a 'feeder' system associated with LAB2 and LAB3. The basal contact of LAB1 on the southern side of the Whanganui Inlet is thus inferred to represent the boundary between the North Cape and Farewell Formations. The downstream coarsening of LAB2 and LAB3 is best interpreted by coarse grained sediment being fed from active (penecontemporaneous) intrabasin antithetic and synthetic faults and/or the Kahurangi fault in the west. The interpretation of the Wakamarama Fault as a growth fault during the deposition of LAB1, LAB2 and LAB3 is supported by the lack of change in grain size of LAB1 up-section and the fine grained texture of LAB3 at Abel Head. The change in position of the North Cape Formation upper contact results in the recognition of a new lithostratigraphic unit, the Wharariki member, for the fluvial deposits upon LAA3. Also LAB1 is deemed sufficiently structurally, texturally and compositionally distinct to suggest it be called the Whanganui Member of the Farewell Formation. The boundary between association A and association B sediments is interpreted as a type 1 sequence stratigraphic boundary.

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  • Ring laser dynamics.

    King, Benjamin Thomas (1999)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The departure of the behaviour of large ring laser gyros from the ideal is examined. A detailed description of the experimental operation of large ring lasers is provided along with several new innovations in equipment layout, data collection and especially in data reduction. The limits on gyro performance due to noise are investigated. A review of literature regarding the fundamental limit placed on gyro resolution is provided. This limit is due to spontaneous emission in the gain medium of the laser and it is demonstrated that our ring lasers approach this quantum limit. Two entirely independent methods for evaluating the quantum noise induced linewidth are demonstrated to agree well. One of the methods, which uses a second order autoregressive model, is able to make accurate linewidth estimates in sub-second gate times. A complex model is proposed which accounts for specific observed light scattering phenomena within a ring laser. This model is compared with dual beam data taken from C-I and is able to describe frequency shifts and waveform distortion accurately. The model also performs favourably when describing locking profiles for low rotation rates and externally induced perimeter modulation. When locked to an external signal the ring laser is found to be an extremely sensitive low frequency vibration detector. The commissioning of a very large (14 m perimeter) prototype ring laser gyro, GO, is described along with a comparison with the smaller ( 4 m perimeter) gyros C-I and C-II. This prototype has proven to be an invaluable testing ground for designs and techniques to be used on a proposed high precision 16 m perimeter gyro named the Grossring (G).

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  • Pollen Dispersal Across the Southern Alps, South Island, New Zealand

    Randall, Paul M. (1990)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The aim of this research was to improve the understanding of modern pollen deposition in central South Island in order to interpret Quaternary pollen profiles. This was accomplished by examining the results from a chain of pollen traps (exposed for one year), moss polsters collected along a transect from Westland across the Southern Alps to Canterbury (with and without addition of exotic spores to facilitate 'absolute' counting) and three short peat monoliths. The role of topography, vegetation type and weather patterns were also briefly assessed. The results were analysed by means of principal components and cluster analyses to identify the respective contribution of different pollen taxa. The conclusions are: 1. Trap and polster results are broadly comparable. 2. With exceptions, caused by local effects such as fire and contributions by adjacent vegetation and taxa introduced since 1850, the monolith profiles show little change over the period studied. 3. Forest sites in Westland were dominated by pollen of local podocarps (Dacrydium cupressinum, Prumnopitys) and broadleaved angiosperm species (Metrosideros, Quintinia, Weinmannia). Nothofagus fusca type pollen dominates within the beech forest areas, but drops to about 10% a short distance from the forest edge. Poaceae pollen shows low frequencies in forested sites, but dominates in grass/scrubland areas. 4. Sites above the treeline on the Main Divide shows proportionately high counts of exogenous Podocarpaceae pollen. However, the high counts involve no 'real' increase in regional deposition.

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  • "A colour line affair" : race, imperialism and rugby football contacts between New Zealand and South Africa to 1950.

    Buckley, Mike (1996)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis is an attempt to construct an alternative tradition of New Zealand and South African rugby football contacts to 1950. It examines the wider social conditions of such contacts, unlike the existing plethora of rugby-centred chronicles of matches, tours, and sporting personalities. Rugby tours between New Zealand and South Africa before 1950 raised questions over the relationship between sport, race and imperialism. The manner that rugby reflected the divergent racial traditions in both societies thus challenges the cliche that sport is separate from wider social and political considerations. The thesis consists of an introduction, conclusion and four chapters. The chapters correlate with the New Zealand and South African rugby exchanges of 1921, 1928, 1937, and 1949. They are dominated by the themes of race relations and sporting imperialism, which form the context of the tours. Research is based on New Zealand newspaper sources; contextual material is derived from secondary sources.

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  • Final report for BOP Fertiliser Ltd. : transportation, marketing, process design and costing for the commercialisation of granular reactive phosphate rock

    Ferris, Tim (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This report was completed to determine the commercial feasibility of granular Reactive Phosphate Rock (RPR) as a fertiliser, and the requirements needed to bring it to market. Recommendations based on this report are as follows: • Redesign the existing Morrinsville plant • Change the name of the final product to something that is not directly associated with RPR, ie Gradual Delivery Phosphate • Convince the sales representatives in the ability of the new granular RPR • Employ a dedicated representative to target the forest and organic markets • Sell granular RPR for $210 per tonne ex works from year one • Consider adding extra nutrients into granular RPR for the Forestry market • Use marketing to current markets extensively • Appoint a Program Director for the implementation of granular RPR • Offer bulk discounts and special deals to bring in customers for the initial sale of RPR.

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  • Cliff erosion and coastal change, mid Canterbury.

    Flatman, Michael R. (1997)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The mid Canterbury coast has been largely neglected in the coastal research of the South Island's East Coast. This thesis investigates cliff erosion and coastal change in mid Canterbury. The mid Canterbury coast is comprised of mixed sand and gravel beaches with unconsolidated alluvium cliffs landward of the beaches. The average erosion rate of the cliffs is 0.43m.y( 1 • This rate masks spatial and temporal variations in cliff erosion rates. Erosion at the northern section of the study area is 0.7m.y( 1 faster than erosion at the southern end. In the long-term (15 years) cliff height is the major controlling factor on the spatial variations of cliff erosion (r = 0.733). Beach volume controls short-term (1 year) spatial variations of cliff erosion (r = -0.774). Coastal storm frequency significantly controls temporal variations of cliff erosion (r = 0.635). Erosion of the mid Canterbury cliffs yields 228,339m3 .y( 1 to the coast. Longshore sediment transport is predominantly in a northward direction and provides a net sediment quantity of 40,645m3 .y( 1 • The mid Canterbury coast is bisected by two major rivers, the Ashburton and Rangitata. Their specific sediment yields are among the largest in the world. Sediment yields of beach forming material (coarse sands and gravels) are much lower supplying 25,000 and 28,000m3 .yr- 1 of sediment to the coast. The mid Canterbury coast has a sediment budget deficit of 27,500m3 .yr- 1 • Major sources of sediment to the mid Canterbury coast are cliff erosion (70 per cent), river transport (17 per cent) and longshore sediment transport (13 per cent). Major sediment sinks include offshore transport through abrasion (76.8 per cent) and longshore sediment transport (23.2 per cent). The large amount of sediment lost through abrasion suggests that sediment, once it arrives on the coast has a short 'life span' before it is ground up. Total beach sediment volume varies significantly from year to year but is losing 27,500m3 .yr- 1 of sediment on average.

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  • Feminist theories and practices of lawyering: Legal representation for women who are survivors of domestic violence

    Seuffert, Nan Marie (1995)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The image of a spiral represents the relationship between theory, practices and the experiences of women in the continual project of developing feminist theories. Feminists create tentative theories to explain the experiences of women. These theories inform feminist practices. The practices then lead to new experiences and new interpretations of experiences, which may require new or revised theories. Feminist theories are therefore subject to constant testing in the light of the diverse experiences of women. Each turn on the spiral may require revisiting the same issues; each movement upward on the spiral also represents development of feminist theories towards the goal of more accurately reflecting the diverse experiences of women. The first goal of this project was to consider how feminists develop feminist theories from the experiences of women, considering the relationship between theory and practice in gathering the experiences of women, and in the interpretation and presentation of those experiences. The second goal was to develop feminist theories of lawyering in the area of domestic violence from the experiences of women who are survivors of domestic violence, thereby moving feminist theories of lawyering a full turn on the theory-practice spiral. The theoretical component of the first goal of the project required using feminist theories to inform the gathering and interpretation of the experiences of women with their legal representation. The theoretical component of the second goal required testing current feminist theories of lawyering in light of these experiences. The experiences of women are therefore central to the theoretical aspects of the project. They also provide a focus for the practical aspects of the project: recommendations for lawyers about representing women who are survivors of domestic violence. Perhaps the most significant finding of the research is the frequency with which the women felt that their lawyers did not believe them, especially with respect to the level of danger in which they lived and the severity of the abuse that they endured. Focusing on the disbelief of the lawyers with respect to these aspects of the women's experiences revealed the lawyers' lack of understanding of the dynamics of domestic violence. This finding alone virtually precludes the possibilities for truly ethical lawyer-client relationships in which power is shared and the twoway process of lawyer translation takes place in the context of mutual understanding, respect and a willingness to listen which are required for dialogue. These findings also provide a backdrop to the other issues raised by the research, especially the lack of involvement of the women in decision-making and the lack of advocacy provided to the women. Effective legal representation requires that lawyers be aware of the context in which women seek protection from the legal system, and that lawyers be prepared to assist the women in ensuring their safety by advocating for protection by the legal system throughout the legal process. Lawyers should also be prepared to confront and expose gender bias as it operates in particular cases in a manner that furthers the interests of their clients, and to assist in ensuring that women receive adequate support in using the legal process. The development of feminist theories builds on what we know about women's experiences by producing tentative theories which are tested in light of further experiences. In this project, feminist theories concerning the gathering and interpretation of women's experiences provided the basis for the development of the research methods. The experiences gathered were used to test the recent developments in feminist theories of lawyering. Attention to the situated aspects of experiences resulted in the development of situated theories of feminist lawyering: theories that are relevant to non-Maori women in New Zealand, and that provide a lens through which other women might consider their own theories, practices and experiences.

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  • The treatment of childhood in the novels of Charlotte and Emily Brontë

    Tan, Elis P. N. (1990)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    In this thesis I have dealt with Charlotte and Emily Brontë's representation of children in their novels, and the significance of childhood as it reflects or suggests the authors' attitudes to morality, character, and society. I have studied what Charlotte and Emily overtly or covertly say about children and the adults that they grow into, as a means of assessing the similarities and differences in the sisters' attitudes, taking into consideration as well, how these attitudes compare with contemporary images of childhood. I have chosen to examine the published novels of Charlotte and Emily, and have used for my research both critical and biographical material written on the Brontës. In chapter one, I introduce both writers vis-à-vis two major influences in Victorian literature, namely, religion and romanticism, comparing the extent to which the sisters are affected by these opposing traditions in their treatment of childhood. Chapters two and three deal separately with Charlotte and Emily and their novels. The final chapter offers a conclusion with regard to the similarities and differences between these authors, including the distinction between their narrative techniques that reflect their differing literary motives. Unlike Charlotte, Emily wrote for personal catharsis and awareness rather than for didactic reasons. While both Brontës reveal their moral attitudes on the question of childhood, Emily, unlike her sister, remains non-judgemental. Also, although both sisters accept harsh reality, Emily seems to do so reluctantly compared to Charlotte who is quite unambiguous about it.

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  • The behaviour of reactive power marginal prices in an electricity spot market

    Ward, Andrew Graeme (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis investigates the behaviour of marginal prices for reactive power in a competitive electricity spot market. In the proposed spot market, non-zero unit costs are assigned to the generation of reactive power as a method of paying for reactive power ancillary services. These costs enable reactive power to be optimally dispatched in the same manner as real power. This is unlike previous research, which has only described the behaviour of reactive power marginal prices in spot markets where the unit generation costs of reactive power equal zero. The theory of Dispatch Based Pricing, proposed by Ring [1995] is used to calculate and describe the behaviour of reactive power marginal prices for this spot market. Dispatch Based Pricing is an ex post variant of spot pricing, with the rare ability to accept non-zero unit generation costs for reactive power. It was originally derived from an optimal power flow (OPF) formulation. A new classification system for power system nodes in any OPF formulation is defined to enable the behaviour of reactive power marginal prices to be clearly described. Hence, Dispatch Based Pricing is redefined with respect to this classification system. An OPF is developed to validate this redefined Dispatch Based Pricing model and the marginal prices generated thereby. This OPF accepts non-zero unit generation costs for both real and reactive power, and uses them to optimally dispatch real and reactive power generation. The mechanisms determining the behaviour of reactive power marginal prices are investigated for optimal and sub-optimal dispatches of an unconstrained power system. Price behaviour is also investigated for optimal dispatches of voltage-constrained and reactive-power-generation-constrained power systems. The implications of this reactive power marginal price behaviour are discussed. It is shown that Dispatch Based Pricing can be used to calculate marginal prices when a load-following generator is used to supply reactive power. The conclusions regarding the behaviour of reactive power marginal prices are used to propose a spot market with non-zero reactive power unit generation costs, for the South Island section of New Zealand's National Grid. The use of Dispatch Based Pricing to calculate reactive power marginal prices for this spot market is detailed. The effects of this spot market on the operation of this South Island power system are then discussed.

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  • Emerging Fisheries – Threat or Opportunity?

    Gibson, Mark; McKay, David; Nicholls, Jill; Paton, Mark (1999)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Between the months of January and March, 1999, the Canterbury Univesity's inaugral course for the Certificate in Continuing Educatron, Antarctic Studies, engaged a research syndicate to investigate and report upon threats and opportunities related to emerging fisheries in the Southern Ocean. This report is the product of that study, and has been prepared in support of an oral presentation Of the syndicate's findings, at Canterbury university, on Friday 19 February, 1999. The purpose Of this report is to encourage discussion and evaluation of dominant perspectives which determine current fisheries management, towards a significant shift in understanding, values and human interactions with marine ecosy<ems.

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  • Antarctica – A Strategic Asset?

    Weinstein, Phil; Boniface, Nick; Bishop, Joanne; Noble, Nicola; Bichard, Valerie (1999)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    It's 1999 and as we rapidly head towuds the new millennium the management of global issues require the pro-active participation of all members of the intemational community. Growing strains on the quality of water, soil and air, loss of biodiversity, depletion of fish stocks, current patterns of production consumption and global climate change, all raise questions about the continued capacity of the Earth's natural resource base to feed and sustain a growing and increasingly urbanised population. It's now clear also clear that not only environmental, but also social, cultural and political sustainability of development efforts are essential for security and well-being of people functioning in this complex, interdependent global system now emerging. Globalisation is marked clearly by the integration of trade; finance and information that is creating a single global market and culture. The rapid advancements in science and technology has also contributed enormously to the realisation of the global village. This process of globalisation is currently challenging the Antarctic Treaty System. With this, many questions are being raised as to whether the ATS is capable of weathering these changes to emerge as a significant contributor to a unified global identity. The vision for the future is a sustainable earth. The race is against time and Antarctica holds the key for the doorway into the next millennium. In this presentation you have an opportunity to reflect on the complex perception of value as we explore four assets that may contribute to the strategic value of Antarctica in the 21" century and beyond. These assets include: It's 1999 and as we rapidly head towuds the new millennium the management of global issues require the pro-active participation of all members of the intemational community. Growing strains on the quality of water, soil and air, loss of biodiversity, depletion of fish stocks, current patterns of production consumption and global climate change, all raise questions about the continued capacity of the Earth's natural resource base to feed and sustain a growing and increasingly urbanised population. It's now clear also clear that not only environmental, but also social, cultural and political sustainability of development efforts are essential for security and well-being of people functioning in this complex, interdependent global system now emerging. Globalisation is marked clearly by the integration of trade; finance and information that is creating a single global market and culture. The rapid advancements in science and technology has also contributed enormously to the realisation of the global village. This process of globalisation is currently challenging the Antarctic Treaty System. With this, many questions are being raised as to whether the ATS is capable of weathering these changes to emerge as a significant contributor to a unified global identity. The vision for the future is a sustainable earth. The race is against time and Antarctica holds the key for the doorway into the next millennium. In this presentation you have an opportunity to reflect on the complex perception of value as we explore four assets that may contribute to the strategic value of Antarctica in the 21" century and beyond. These assets include:

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  • Antarctic Tourism – Where to Now?

    Downer, Kate; Reaney, Richard; Watson, Nigel; Wouters, Mariska (1999)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper examines the fixture of tourism in the Antarctic. It raises some fundamental policy issues and aims to challenge some preconceptions of tourism' s role and impact on the continent. The test it puts to governments is to 'lay their cards On the table' - to articulate clearly their policies on the future direction of Antarctic tourism. Parties to the Antarctic Treaty System (ATS) and the governments Of the gateway states will continue in the foreseeable Short to medium tenn future to dictate the form and pace of Antarctic tourism. With this comes an obligation to fulfil their self appointed environmental stewardship role and not pursue tourist opportunities simply as a back door approach to strengthening their sovereignty claims, pursuing economic benefits or political agendas. This paper examines the fixture of tourism in the Antarctic. It raises some fundamental policy issues and aims to challenge some preconceptions of tourism' s role and impact on the continent. The test it puts to governments is to 'lay their cards On the table' - to articulate clearly their policies on the future direction of Antarctic tourism. Parties to the Antarctic Treaty System (ATS) and the governments Of the gateway states will continue in the foreseeable Short to medium tenn future to dictate the form and pace of Antarctic tourism. With this comes an obligation to fulfil their self appointed environmental stewardship role and not pursue tourist opportunities simply as a back door approach to strengthening their sovereignty claims, pursuing economic benefits or political agendas.

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  • Human Artefacts in Antarctica – Treasure to be Conserved or Junk to be Removed?

    Cadenhead, Natalie; Johnston, Lindsay; Kestle, Linda; Webb, Keryn (1999)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The question generating this report was perceived by the syndicate to be a limited question as it is couched in very black and white terms with no middle ground indicated. There was considerable debate concerning the definitions and assumptions and the emotive tone Of the question. Due to the possibility of the wide scope Of the question, the bulk Of the artefacts discussed will be those of the Ross Sea Region with reference to Other Antarctic where appropriate. Several definitions concerns were raised from research into the question. The following definitions will provide clarity. Artefacts are movable historic items Of all descriptions that are directly associated with an Antarctic expedition, and which were taken to Antarctica for consumption or use there, or were created by members of an expedition while in the Antarctic. 1 Conservation refers to the professional preservation techniques involved in maintaining an artefacts structural and contextual integrity. Conservation is about doing reversible 'repairs' to an Object and does not include restoration where new permanent materials may be adhered to the artefact, Conservation aims to minimize avoidable loss or decay Of an area, site, or associated artefact. Rubbish 2 refers to an item which . Is in such poor condition that it is not reasonably possible to conserve it 2. Has a limited life if left untreated Does not contribute in any significant way to Our understanding Of the human history of Antarctica 3. Does not contribute to the visual qualities Of the site or building of which it is a part 4. 5 Is not a unique or relatively rare item Junk refers to any item that is regarded as Of little value. Rubbish is junk. 3 Treasure refers to items that are valued for their uniqueness, rarity, associations, and emotional attachment, Relic refers to a part or a fragment of an object left after the rest has decayed. Any Object valued as a being a memorial or souvenir of the past, including corpses. The question generating this report was perceived by the syndicate to be a limited question as it is couched in very black and white terms with no middle ground indicated. There was considerable debate concerning the definitions and assumptions and the emotive tone Of the question. Due to the possibility of the wide scope Of the question, the bulk Of the artefacts discussed will be those of the Ross Sea Region with reference to Other Antarctic where appropriate. Several definitions concerns were raised from research into the question. The following definitions will provide clarity. Artefacts are movable historic items Of all descriptions that are directly associated with an Antarctic expedition, and which were taken to Antarctica for consumption or use there, or were created by members of an expedition while in the Antarctic. 1 Conservation refers to the professional preservation techniques involved in maintaining an artefacts structural and contextual integrity. Conservation is about doing reversible 'repairs' to an Object and does not include restoration where new permanent materials may be adhered to the artefact, Conservation aims to minimize avoidable loss or decay Of an area, site, or associated artefact. Rubbish 2 refers to an item which . Is in such poor condition that it is not reasonably possible to conserve it 2. Has a limited life if left untreated Does not contribute in any significant way to Our understanding Of the human history of Antarctica 3. Does not contribute to the visual qualities Of the site or building of which it is a part 4. 5 Is not a unique or relatively rare item Junk refers to any item that is regarded as Of little value. Rubbish is junk. 3 Treasure refers to items that are valued for their uniqueness, rarity, associations, and emotional attachment, Relic refers to a part or a fragment of an object left after the rest has decayed. Any Object valued as a being a memorial or souvenir of the past, including corpses.

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  • Conservation and Southern Ocean

    Gibson, Mark (1999)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Conservation in the Southern Ocean has taken on a new light. Pirate fishing Of the Antarctic Toothfish (Dissosthichus eleginoides) has made New Zealand headlines for the last tvt«t months. The Antarctic Toothfish (See Photo 1) is the focus but the underlylng IS conservation. Conservation in the Southern Ocean has taken on a new light. Pirate fishing Of the Antarctic Toothfish (Dissosthichus eleginoides) has made New Zealand headlines for the last tvt«t months. The Antarctic Toothfish (See Photo 1) is the focus but the underlylng IS conservation.

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  • Antarctic Tourism

    Wouters, Mariska (1999)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    During the investigation into the future of Antarctic tourism and New Zealand'S role, abundant literature was found which covered the historical record of human activity in the Antarctic, and the advent of people arriving in the Antarctic for the sole purpose of tourism. There was less information available on the history of New Zealand's involvement in Antarctic tourism. Generally, any information would be referred to within the context of work based on another research area Or in reference to the danger Of tourist activity in the Antarctic, especially the Mount Erebus crash. A number of articles available on Antarctic tourism are beginning to research the status of tourism to the Ross Sea Region, which is administered by New Zealand, and has become the second most popular tourist destination in Antarctica. As will be shown below, there is limited literature available on the future of New Zealand in Antarctic tourism. During the investigation into the future of Antarctic tourism and New Zealand'S role, abundant literature was found which covered the historical record of human activity in the Antarctic, and the advent of people arriving in the Antarctic for the sole purpose of tourism. There was less information available on the history of New Zealand's involvement in Antarctic tourism. Generally, any information would be referred to within the context of work based on another research area Or in reference to the danger Of tourist activity in the Antarctic, especially the Mount Erebus crash. A number of articles available on Antarctic tourism are beginning to research the status of tourism to the Ross Sea Region, which is administered by New Zealand, and has become the second most popular tourist destination in Antarctica. As will be shown below, there is limited literature available on the future of New Zealand in Antarctic tourism.

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  • An Analysis of Trace Lead, Cadmium and Zinc Levels in Antarctic Soils

    Powell, H.K; Paton, Mark (1999)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The Analysis of Trace Lead, Cadmium, and Zinc Levels in Antarctic Soils The Analysis of Trace Lead, Cadmium, and Zinc Levels in Antarctic Soils

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  • International Project Management, with Particular Reference to Antarctica and the Cape Roberts Project

    Noble, Nicola (1999)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Various economic, social and political considerations have led to an increasing number of international projects being implemented. These projects can provide valuable opportunities to all the participants including an increased resource pool, greater depth of knowledge in all areas and top quality state-of-the-art technology. This report examines the use of project management techniques and how they Can be applied to international scale If scientific research is to grow in the future as it has done in the past, many advances and an increased awareness in project management and international relations is essential. Antaraica, an ideal laboratory, provides the perfect place for nations to participate in interdisciplinazy studies and research. With increased global co-operation and collaboration, the research carried out will continue to be refreshing and new, while providing the increased resources and technologr required in today's society, and in the future. Various economic, social and political considerations have led to an increasing number of international projects being implemented. These projects can provide valuable opportunities to all the participants including an increased resource pool, greater depth of knowledge in all areas and top quality state-of-the-art technology. This report examines the use of project management techniques and how they Can be applied to international scale If scientific research is to grow in the future as it has done in the past, many advances and an increased awareness in project management and international relations is essential. Antaraica, an ideal laboratory, provides the perfect place for nations to participate in interdisciplinazy studies and research. With increased global co-operation and collaboration, the research carried out will continue to be refreshing and new, while providing the increased resources and technologr required in today's society, and in the future.

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  • A Review of the Diving Adaptations of Weddell Seals (Leptonychotes Weddellii)

    Webb, Keryn (1999)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This report contains a compilation and review of adaptations of Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) for diving. Discussed are anatomical adaptations including its teeth and eye structure, and ability to collapse its lung; behavioural adaptations including diving within its anaerobic dive limit; and physiological adaptations including having high haemoglobin and myoglobin, and ability to control heart rate and consequent blood circulation. Their unique adaptations, as well as those they share with phocids and pinnipeds in general, are addressed, including comparisons where appropriate. This report contains a compilation and review of adaptations of Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) for diving. Discussed are anatomical adaptations including its teeth and eye structure, and ability to collapse its lung; behavioural adaptations including diving within its anaerobic dive limit; and physiological adaptations including having high haemoglobin and myoglobin, and ability to control heart rate and consequent blood circulation. Their unique adaptations, as well as those they share with phocids and pinnipeds in general, are addressed, including comparisons where appropriate.

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  • Marine Protected Areas for Antarctica

    Gibson, Mark (1999)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The marine environment accounts for 71% of the earth's surface (Nybakken, 1997). As water is a three dimensional medium, this makes the entire volume Where organisms can live equate to 1370 x 106 km3, Which makes it the single largest habitat stanghQlQ on the planet. The marine environment is in need Of protection. Protection is urgent to conserve marine heritage and life support systems of the globe (Kelleher & Kenchington, 1992). The oceans regulate climate, dissolve harmful gases, provide food and habitats to sustain life on planet earth. The natural state of the marine ecosystems needs preservation. Oceans of the world have not been respected by humans in the past. Humans have seen them as an inexhaustible source Of food, as having an infinite capacity to absorb and purify our wastes, and as a source of all the raw materials to sustain an industrial society (Nybakken, 1997). This has gone on for too long. Humans are adversely effecting the marine environment all the time. Constant destruction Of our terrestrial habitat directly effects the marine environment in many ways. For example, domestic sewage entering aquatic systems inevitably ends up in the oceans, Consideration Of our impacts needs to take form. The marine environment accounts for 71% of the earth's surface (Nybakken, 1997). As water is a three dimensional medium, this makes the entire volume Where organisms can live equate to 1370 x 106 km3, Which makes it the single largest habitat stanghQlQ on the planet. The marine environment is in need Of protection. Protection is urgent to conserve marine heritage and life support systems of the globe (Kelleher & Kenchington, 1992). The oceans regulate climate, dissolve harmful gases, provide food and habitats to sustain life on planet earth. The natural state of the marine ecosystems needs preservation. Oceans of the world have not been respected by humans in the past. Humans have seen them as an inexhaustible source Of food, as having an infinite capacity to absorb and purify our wastes, and as a source of all the raw materials to sustain an industrial society (Nybakken, 1997). This has gone on for too long. Humans are adversely effecting the marine environment all the time. Constant destruction Of our terrestrial habitat directly effects the marine environment in many ways. For example, domestic sewage entering aquatic systems inevitably ends up in the oceans, Consideration Of our impacts needs to take form.

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  • Antarctica New Zealand and Environmental Education

    McKay, David (1999)

    Postgraduate Certificate thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This study investigates Antarctica New Zealand's (ANZ) current recognition, understandings and use of environmental education as a management tool to optimise the achievement of o*ctives Of its and plans. It is written in the hope that, through this study Of its literature. Antarctica New Zealand may identify Strengths and weaknesses in its current use Of education, information and training, become aware of alternative approaches, and ensure optimal use and outcomes Of educational opportunties for and wth Antaraica and the Southern Ocean (M.f.E., to We for Otr Envi•onment.• A National Strategy for Environmental Education, 1998). This study investigates Antarctica New Zealand's (ANZ) current recognition, understandings and use of environmental education as a management tool to optimise the achievement of o*ctives Of its and plans. It is written in the hope that, through this study Of its literature. Antarctica New Zealand may identify Strengths and weaknesses in its current use Of education, information and training, become aware of alternative approaches, and ensure optimal use and outcomes Of educational opportunties for and wth Antaraica and the Southern Ocean (M.f.E., to We for Otr Envi•onment.• A National Strategy for Environmental Education, 1998).

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