855 results for Thesis, Unitec Research Bank

  • Strategic human resource management impacts on local managerial employees’ capacity building in foreign companies in Laos People’s Democratic Republic

    Vilayvong, Sonethavy (2016)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    To succeed in today’s competitive business environment, Strategic Human Resource Management (SHRM) should be integrated with the organisational strategic plan. Particularly, SHRM in capacity building should be taken into account. This is because SHRM in capacity building can enhance the capabilities of the organisational workforce which is a key value of the organisation in performing better work, as well as increasing the productivity of the organisation. In Laos, there are high numbers of foreign investments, thus investors require a competent local workforce to operate their businesses, especially at the management level. Therefore, if business firms wish to survive in the competitive environment, they should implement the right SHRM in capacity building for their local managerial workforce which is a key success factor for organisations. This research project employs a qualitative approach to study some research questions in capacity building of local managerial employees. The main objective is to examine whether foreign companies in Laos possess the appropriate SHRM in capacity building for their local managerial employees. If they do not possess it, what is the effective SHRM in capacity building for the local managerial employees that should be designed and implemented? This research study also applies the semi-structured interview as the main data collecting technique with twelve participants from seven foreign companies in Laos. The findings revealed valuable perceptions of HR professionals toward the SHRM in capacity building which provide positive answers to the research questions. All of the participants from foreign firms in Laos possess SHRM in capacity building for their local managerial employees but its implementation was not executed effectively. From the findings, the effective implementation of outstanding SHRM in capacity building, the so-called localisation strategy, was reported by three participants, whilst nine participants said that there were some obstacles that prevented the implementation and practice of SHRM in capacity building, namely limited budget, less important roles of HRM in strategic level, not sufficient qualification of local managerial employees and unsuitable specific development programmes. Therefore, to conclude the finding of the research, there is a model of ‘SHRM in capacity building for the local managerial employees in Laos’ which has been developed by the researcher. This model aims to guide the suitable steps and implementation of the SHRM in capacity building of the local managerial employees for foreign firms in Laos, to assist them to improve their performance and productivity.

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  • Aqua house: A house design that explores the possibility of integrating architecture and water, technically and aesthetically

    Dykstra, Les (2007)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This project has resulted from current concerns about global water usage and the increasing pollution of water environments. The research focuses on the relationship of water and architecture. The preliminary research re-examines the place that water occupies in architecture in order to determine how current practices in architecture contribute to the pollution of water environments and to what is believed to be an unsustainable usage of water. The project then seeks to investigate how some of these practices in architecture could be modified in the future in order to mitigate the water problem.

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  • Place: A situation of becoming

    Claire O'Shaughnessy (2008)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This is a masters by design project in Landscape Architecture. The research was conducted using a competition brief for an otherwise inconspicuous inner city terrain to develop a design technique that attempts to achieve some of the goals of place theory without falling prey to the essentialism associated with the tradition of this theory. One of the aims of this project is to participate in a general Rehabilitation of place theory in design discourse, in order to deal with some of the problems that arise as a result of a commonly adopted global design approach which does not acknowledge the specific circumstances of a landscape. The problem that immediately presents itself is that place theory and the concept of place are considered by some no longer to be relevant in a time when they have already been widely criticised. As Edward Casey says in The Fate of Place, ‘Space and Place are historical entities subject to the vagaries of time’. The term ‘place’ has been tainted by historical references which are considered singular, exclusive and socially damaging. Therefore the reintroduction of this term in contemporary architectural discussions has been done with caution and thorough redefi nition. Throughout this project I have made myself aware of the criticisms, while familiarising myself with the motivations of traditional place theory. The aim of the project is to meet at least some of the criticisms and make place theory a useful way to approach the design for dynamic, becoming landscapes.

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  • How can Netlogo be used in the landscape architectural design process?

    Popov, Nikolay (2007)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    “The frame of our view is already framed by a part of its content. We can easily recognize here the topology of the Moebius band where, as in a kind of abyssal inversion, the envelope itself is encased by its interior.” Slavoj Zizek The objective of this masters project is to test the applicability of the Netlogo[1] computer complexity modelling environment to landscape architectural design. This is achieved by designing four Netlogo models of different landscape systems and critically evaluating their usefulness in the design process, outlining possible improvements and shortcomings of the models, and finally making some speculative suggestions for future utilisations of this or other similar techniques in landscape architecture. The recent adoption of complexity theory by landscape architectural writers and the new viewpoints offered by landscape urbanism combined with theoretical and technological innovation in various fields - ranging from object oriented computer programming to geographic information science and urban modeling techniques - provided the theoretical frame work and prompted a possible methodology for this project. Landscape architectural theory has shifted to accommodate the ideas and perspectives originating in complexity theory, changing opinions within the profession.Landscapes are now seen as systems that are open, chaotic, unpredictable, irreversible, and in constant flux – i.e. complex adaptive systems. It has also been accepted that there is little to distinguish between ‘natural’ and ‘artificial’. The interests of landscape architects have shifted from objects to processes and forces, from ‘how things look’ to ‘what they do’. This new paradigm has also provided a useful model for urban designers and planners thus potentially allowing for a more unified perspective within landscape architecture, planning and urban design. Urban Planners now work with the idea that cities are complex, bottom-up phenomena. From this profession, methodologies and techniques have further been developed for modelling or simulating complex adaptive systems and applied them to cities. These techniques made it possible to explore cities ‘bottom up’, to play numerous scenarios for possible futures and to investigate the emergence and development of urban patterns. These methodologies are still missing from the landscape architectural ‘tool bag’. This project introduces, adapts, and evaluates some of the most recent methodologies and algorithms employed in urban simulations for landscape architectural applications. The method explored by this masters project is called multi-agent simulations (MAS). It derives from distributed artificial intelligence studies and it is of a particular interest when modeling space-time dynamics within environmental and urban systems. The underlying concept is that models exhibit behaviours described entirely by their internal mechanisms. Every member, or agent, of the system has a strategy, and when the simulation is running, all agents are implementing their strategies in a parallel manner, while simultaneously registering the changes in the surrounding world. MAS can explore the connection between micro-level behaviour of individuals and the macro-level patterns that emerge from the interaction of many individuals. Netlogo was chosen as the MAS modeling environment according to a set of pragmatic criteria. Learning to work with it was a time consuming and difficult process. This is why the four models developed for this project have an increasing degree of complexity. It is well recognised that models are simplifications of the real thing but they also have many advantages – it is possible to ask multiple ‘what if?’ questions about the system of interest, and this is absolutely central to their use in design and planning, together with their ability to simplify and manipulate worlds associated with human and natural systems and to experiment with them using simulation in ways that were simply unthinkable in earlier times. The evaluation of Netlogo was made by modeling four simulations or case studies that may be of interest to landscape architects and then critically evaluating their advantages and shortcomings. The first case study deals with pedestrian movement simulations at small scale. Two types of pedestrian behaviour are studied - Flocking (curiosity or ‘what one’s neighbour is doing?’) and Turbulence (the desire to flee or to reach some goal). Building 1, Unitec, Carrington Road, Mt. Albert, Auckland and the surrounding areas were selected for this experiment. The second case study deals with hydrology dynamics and GIS – Netlogo data exchange. The Unitec site and the GIS elevation data available were used as a basis for this simulation. Tropical Forest Dynamics is the third case study. It is grounded in the disturbance ecology paradigm i.e. that ecosystems need disturbance events in order to survive. The simulation utilizes a virtual, conical, tropical island as its basis and studies the emergent regenerative forests patterns after cyclone disturbance. Pacific Settlement Regeneration is the fourth simulation. It studies the recovery process of a small Pacific settlement after a cyclonic event. The chosen site was Houma Village, located on the island of Eua, Tonga. This masters project introduces complexity simulations into landscape architectural practice by investigating the advantages and the drawbacks of this type of modelling. It will suggest how the developed models may be further enriched, propose how some of the drawbacks can be overcome, and identify limitations. Finally, there will be some speculations about the future of this technique in landscape architecture.

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  • Visual tactility: Architectural photography and tactile design process

    Wong, Linda (2007)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    To investigate the designing potential of the photograph in architecture, through tactile design processes. It can be argued there are two familiar ways architecture is portrayed in a photographic image. The first is the incidental relationship of architecture to the subject of the image. The second is the heightened objectification of the built form. The former often correlates with the depiction of a spatial interior, whereas the latter is more often seen in reference to the exterior of a building. Walter Benjamin states: “Buildings are appropriated in a two fold matter: by use and by perception – or rather by touch and sight…On the tactile side there is no counterpart to contemplation on the optical side. Tactile appropriation is accomplished not so much by attention as by habit. As regards architecture, habit determines to a large extent even optical reception. The latter, too, occurs much less through rapt attention than by noticing the object in an incidental fashion. This mode of appropriation, developed with reference to architecture, in certain circumstances acquires canonical value.”1 Benjamin implied that one cannot contemplate art or architecture only visually. This contemplation, which leads to habit forming tactile experiential knowledge, is what allows us to appreciate and gain a heightened experience of architecture. However, this tactile knowledge is difficult to obtain through viewing a photograph, as it is principally a visual object. The proliferation of architectural photography has led to a particular refining of content, often influenced by the designers themselves and the commercial interests for which the photograph is commissioned. Jonathan Hill states: “The reputation of an architect is, in part, dependent on his or her ability to generate a good photograph. If an architect is successful the same image is published throughout the world, to be copied by other architects…”2 In the course of this project, my objective was to analyse the photographic image; its periphery, perspective and substance, to explore the photograph’s architectural designing potential, beyond the passive representation of space. 1 Benjamin, W. (1969) The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, Illuminations. (H. Zohn, Trans.). New York: Schocken Books. p.240 2 Hill, J. (2001) Weather Architecture (Berlin 1929-30, Barcelona 1986-, Barcelona 1999-), Architecture – the Subject is Matter (J. Hill Ed.). London: Routledge. p.62

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  • Reframing the Given : How can design techniques drawn from the disciplines of landscape architecture, architecture and the fine arts help to identify and incorporate landscape forces within the analysis phase of landscape architectural design process?

    Griffiths, Christopher (2005)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The purpose of this research, then, is to identify, unravel, and utilise the often overlooked and unseen forces operating in landscapes. My investigation is intended to allow for the elaboration of rich and intricate patterns of organisation in order to enable the deployment of these by landscape students and professionals. This involves thinking of landscape architecture as an operator and regulator of rhythmic moments occurring in the landscape, rather than as a tool with which to configure bounded terrains containing objects.

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  • Redefining coastal erosion

    Shepherd, Delwyn (2009)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research project shows how communities and Territorial Authorities can understand and manage coastal erosion through low impact strategies that work with the dynamic conditions of beaches subject to constant natural and social forces. The proposition is that a network of pohutukawa trees (Metrosideros excelsa) distributed by natural processes can both regulate coastal erosion and encourage a more appropriate inhabitation of the coastal environment by humans. This network of trees is initiated by humans and continued by birds. The research is conducted by means of three design investigations within one coastal region. The site is located at Muriwai, a west coast beach in New Zealand’s North Island. It comprises a small catchment stream system and a sand dune system. Both the stream system and sand dunes have been subject to engineered erosion prevention measures which have actually exacerbated the erosion of the beach. The area between the foreshore dune system of Muriwai Beach and the foothills behind it comprise the main site. Within this area designs have been developed for three smaller sites. The first Waitea Stream at the southern headland of Muriwai Beach has developed severe erosion problems since it was diverted into culvert pipes in 1961. The second site, one kilometre north of the Waitea Stream, was once the fourth Tee of Muriwai Golf Course. It was lost to erosion in1995 and is now abandoned with a large inland sand dune blow-out. The third is three kilometres north of Muriwai Beach Community where the Okiritoto Creek enters the Tasman Sea. The Okiritoto Creek flows through farmland, plantation forest and sand dunes. Its lower reaches are a large area of mobile sand dunes which are currently infested with silver poplars. My design investigations have been motivated by an underlying research proposition that these sites can be developed in such a way as to mitigate erosion [rather than stop it]. I involve existing social practices and provide opportunities for new ones.

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  • How can multiscale mapping generate a multifunctional urban public riverfront?

    Zu, Zhiqiang (2009)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Given the increased complexity and uncertainty of the landscape milieux, mapping as a liberating, enabling, creative activity plays a pivotal role in the design process and affects how we understand and act upon the world. This project employed multiscale mapping to not only interpret, speculate on and explore the performance of an urban public riverfront (Tui Glen Reserve within Henderson Creek Corridor), but also to generate a responsive site design incorporating various landscape performance requirements revealed by the multiscale mapping process. Although the information that emerged from the multiscale maps was inevitably influenced by my mapping protocol and agenda, the project shows that multiscale mapping offers a potentially powerful framework for an improved understanding of the landscape, which in turn, may generate a design capable of responding to different conditions at different scales.

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  • Linking organisational culture and values with a firm's performance: a case study from the NZ airline industry

    Saele, Cato (2007)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The purpose of this research has been two fold. Firstly to conduct a cultural assessment of a New Zealand airline (referred to as “Pukeko Air Ltd.” for confidentiality reasons) in order to identify the perceived current and future preferred organisational culture and organisational values present in this organisation. Secondly to assess how selected organisational members associated the present and future cultural and values profile with organisational performance. A hybrid research methodology was employed, where data was collected in two stages; one quantitative and the other qualitative. First, a quantitative survey questionnaire was distributed to all employees, effectively combining Cameron and Quinn’s (1999) Organisational Culture Assessment Instrument, and McDonald and Gandz’ (1992, p. 69) “Shared values for the modern business corporation”. Second, the results and outcome of the survey formed the basis for six qualitative interviews with senior management staff. The interview questions sought management’s interpretation of survey findings, and in particular the relationship between the current and future cultures and values and associations with organisational performance. The findings from the research show a relatively close alignment between the current and preferred future organisational culture. This signifies that the organisation is in a good situation for the future. Moreover, the research project sought senior staff members’ perceptions of organisational culture’s role in performance. The findings suggest performance is somewhat affected by culture and values, and that these elements helps determining what sort of airline the organisation wants to become, as well as reducing impact of external factors affecting the company. The study indicates not only what type of culture and which values are deemed conducive to success from a management point of view, but also highlights the perceived importance of commitment and ownership in creating a strong culture in this New Zealand Airline.

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  • Franchising in inadequately protected markets : inhibiting factors in entrepreneurial market entry.

    Abughazala, Harry (2006)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    As a result of the growing trend in globalisation, Western fast food entrepreneurs are seeking opportunities to expand their operations in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia, as a developing country, has limited protection of intellectual property, and has limited franchise regulations. Yet, Saudi Arabia is attracting huge foreign direct investments, and fast food franchising is an exponentially growing sector. This study explores the prospects of expanding or starting a fast food business in Saudi Arabia after joining the World Trade Organization. It also explores the barriers, risks and disincentives related to operational quality as well as intellectual property protection. Finally, it explores possible entrepreneurial modes of entry in a similar emerging market. The study concludes that the fast food market in Saudi Arabia is very lucrative as compared to other markets in the region. Several legal and operational barriers are identified. However, neither is reported as insurmountable or negatively affecting entrepreneurial fast food expansion. The preferred mode of entry varies with different entrepreneurs. A well-established entrepreneurial fast food business, with critical firmspecific-advantages may well adopt a mode of wholly-owned subsidiaries locally, and a joint venture mode overseas.

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  • How Can Project Managers Reduce the Misunderstandings That Occur in E-mail Communication?

    Hatfull, Jane (2006)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    E mail communication is used extensively by project managers to communicate with stakeholders and complex project teams during the course of a project. Effective use of this communication channel can aid in achieving project success. This research reviews in detail the communication process within an organisational context. It discusses why effective communication is important for a project manager and how it fits their needs. Research is conducted in a real life organisational setting examining samples of e mail misunderstandings provided by a group of project managers. The analysis of the research results, along with a review of the literature allows the author to provide advice on how project managers can reduce the misunderstandings that occur in e mail communication. Recommendations are made on how the project manager can improve the effectiveness of their e mail communication. Finally, implications of these results for further research and practice are discussed.

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  • Entrepreneurial behaviour amongst larger companies in the New Zealand retail sector - an investigation into the value of corporate entrepreneurship

    Durkan, Therese (2005)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Corporate entrepreneurship is the term used to describe entrepreneurial behaviour in an established, larger organisation (Burns, 2005), and incorporates an ambitious though simple objective to gain competitive advantage by encouraging innovation at all levels in the organisation. Corporate entrepreneurship is sometimes known as intrapreneurship, a term first espoused by Pinchot (1985) to describe a philosophy that tries to bring the external characteristics of entrepreneurs to bear inside a large corporate setting. To focus on this important issue of intrapreneuring as part of corporate entrepreneurship practise the main aim of this research was to explore the ways in which large companies in the New Zealand retail sector value corporate entrepreneurship. To achieve this aim, qualitative data was collected through in-depth face-to-face interviews with eight people (mainly from top-management) from four larger companies in the Auckland region, New Zealand. The subsequent data analysis and discussion focus largely on key factors relating to the recognition of entrepreneurial behaviour within the organisation, the value of entrepreneurial behaviour to the organisation, and the outcomes which have already occurred because of such behaviour. The findings suggest intrapreneuring is seen as a central part of corporate entrepreneurship practice and is widely recognised as important by organisations. The results also demonstrate that many large organisations value entrepreneurship, although to a varying degree. However, the majority of interviewees see themselves, as individuals, in a more entrepreneurial light than their organisations, suggesting that intrapreneurship may occur despite the organisation rather than because of it. The implications of this research suggest that many large organisations do put value on intrapreneurship, and are equipped with the essential tools needed in order for it to flourish, but need to more proactively work towards fostering its introduction as a core competency within the firm. Academics and practitioners alike are encouraged to explore these issues more deeply, and the study concludes by suggesting a number of avenues for further research.

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  • Fussy, unsettled and irritable infants - the mother's voice : how can you support me if you don't understand me?

    Viedma-Dodd, Amanda (2006)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Background: Osteopathic literature on the topic of infant health is from a clinical stand point and lacks supportive research. This project is a first step towards extending this literature by exploring the mothers’ point of view. Objective: To identify and describe factors which mothers associate with their infant’s fussiness, unsettledness or irritability. Methods: The qualitative research design employed in this project was descriptive phenomenology. Participants were recruited through purposeful sampling and consisted of five mothers of fussy, unsettled or irritable infants aged between six and twelve months. Face to face interviews were aimed at exploring the mothers’ experiences from pregnancy till the infant was the age of six months. Colaizzi’s method of analysis was employed to provide a narrative account of the participants’ experience. Results: The focus of the project shifted from factors which cause infant fussiness, unsettledness or irritability to factors which influence infant demeanour. Three themes emerged that described this phenomenon: (1) The effect of understanding on support, (2) The emotional link between mother and infant and (3) The mother’s search to understand and care for her infant. Conclusions: Understanding a mother’s situation is essential for health practitioners to provide her with the appropriate support that she needs to care for her infant.

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  • An Investigation of Changes in Pressure Pain Threshold Due to Hormone Fluctuations During the Menstrual Cycle

    Dunnett, Alenka (2006)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate whether there was a change in pressure pain threshold (PPT) over the course of the menstrual cycle. Changes in PPT were measured at 18 anatomical sites that are used in the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Hypothetically, cyclical changes in PPT at these sites may influence the diagnosis of fibromyalgia. PPTs were assessed over two menstrual cycles using 11 normally menstruating women. PPTs were recorded at three different experimental sessions performed during the menstrual phase (approximately day 3 of menstrual cycle), the follicular phase (approximately day 12-13 of menstrual cycle) and the luteal phase (approximately day 21 of menstrual cycle). A hand-held spring algometer was used to apply pressure to the 18 anatomical sites. An effect size of 0.2 showed small differences between the menstrual and luteal phases in both cycles tested. The menstrual phase showed the lowest mean (standard deviation) PPT in month one and two of 3.15 kg (1.05) and 3.59 kg (1.0) respectively. The luteal phase showed the highest mean (standard deviation) PPT in consecutive cycles of 3.39 kg (1.07) and 3.72 kg (0.8) respectively. There was a general trend of increasing PPT over the six experimental sessions which is hypothesised to be a result of habituation to the experimental stimulus. The greatest variability was found when comparing the nine anatomical sites where pressure was applied. In these locations most comparisons showed large effect sizes. The PPTs found in the current study show individual variation within and between menstrual cycles, which may impact on the individual diagnosis of fibromyalgia.

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  • Implications of personal technologies in the workplace: Distinctions between employer and employee perceptions

    Byrski, Marta (2009)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Personal workplace technologies, with the capability to both enhance productivity and monitor staff performance, have become prevalent in many organisations. With the increased need for the use of personal computers, the Internet and safety and security technologies, employers are offered a plethora of tools that can be used to track the activities of staff during their working day. This thesis offers a case study on an organisation, studying the personal workplace technologies it adopted and how they are applied in the organisation by management. The main reasons for implementation into the core organisational structure are compared between the unique perceptions; those of staff and management. The impact of these technologies, their benefits and problems are discussed and evaluated from the perspectives of both staff and management, which provides a number of points of difference and agreement. McGregor’s Theory X and Theory Y is explored, and compared against the characteristics of the case study organisation. Findings from primary research are then analysed in order to deduce concluding recommendations, particularly the need to increase staff training after implementing personal workplace technologies. Including all affected employees in meetings to discuss personal workplace technology, and its impact on the job role, is vital in increasing transparency and trust. Furthermore, decreasing levels of employee monitoring where possible, and ensuring it is done for reasons other than the need to know the whereabouts and activities of staff would ensure a more positive working environment. These recommendations and conclusions open up an area for further research in order to seek more knowledge into the vital issue of personal workplace technologies and their impact upon an organisation and its actors.

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  • A study of human resource management in a joint venture organisation compared to a locally owned organisation in China

    Sun, Jindi (2009)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The thesis examined the study of human resource management (HRM) in a joint venture organisation compared to a locally owned organisation in China. With the increase in foreign investment in China, more Western invested organisations of various kinds are being established in the Chinese business environment. HRM as a Western concept, has an effective influence in the transition from personnel management to HRM in China. The literature review in the research was focused on some aspects of HRM concepts, which are human resource (HR) functions, Western and Chinese HRM models, the HRM process and international human resource management (IHRM). The research methods were decided using both a qualitative and quantitative approach. Two interviews were conducted with the HR managers from the selected joint venture and locally owned organisation, and questionnaires were completed by 50 employees from each of the selected organisations. All responses were received, and the rate of useable response is 38%. After analysing the findings, the researcher concluded that the development of HRM practices in the joint venture focuses on HR integration in order to build the organisation’s competitive advantage. The development of HRM practices in the locally owned organisation aims at some improvement in HR functions and the innovation of ‘technological HRM’. Finally, it was recommended to both types of organisations to review their HRM system regularly and be more aware of the link between their HRM system and the business’s developing direction. More research is needed concerning HR integration with business development and HRM information management. These aspects are all important to investigate the success of HRM.

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  • Team building - Adding value or variety?

    Cresswell, Debra (2009)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    A case study approach was adopted in order to discover what, if any, are the organisational benefits of team building. Two prominent New Zealand organisations were studied as they undertook innovative activities designed to reflect workplace issues such as problem solving, goal setting and interpersonal relationships. One organisation used team building activities to reinforce the importance of team work, provide opportunities for the participants to better get to know one another, and enhance communication skills. The second organisation used team building activities to support their high performance team programme, which included enhancing communication skills through the use of feedback, developing interpersonal relationships, along with effective problem solving and goal setting. While the two case study organisations had slightly different objectives, the results show that the activities were particularly effective in developing interpersonal relationships and, to a lesser degree, goal setting and problem solving skills. Responses from both organisations point to the team building activities contributing to an overall sense of belonging to the organisation and participants from both organisations also reported they were more likely to talk positively outside of their workplace about their respective companies. In both case studies, participants felt that the team building activities had had a positive impact on their workplace and that, overall, the inclusion of such activities had been beneficial to their organisations. The participants also reported that the use of creative activities along with an element of competition assisted in engaging the participants and contributed to an overall sense of positiveness. The overall findings support previous research, and suggest that team building can add both value and variety, when used as part of an overall training and development initiative.

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  • Impression management in financial reports surrounding CEO turnover

    Goundar, Nadesa (2009)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This study focuses on whether new management uses impression management to influence the presentation of performance in the firm’s annual reports surrounding a changeover in CEO. The study considers the use or non-use of graphs for presenting information as well as distortions in the graphs. Overall there is some evidence for impression management, but it is not strong. Thus impression management as implemented through graphs does not appear to be used as widely in New Zealand as in other jurisdictions where it has been studied.

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  • The use of strategic alliances as an instrument for rapid growth, by New Zealand based questor companies

    Soares, Bernadette (2007)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Businesses in New Zealand are often constrained by the small domestic market, distance from major markets and access to capital, all of which serve as impediments to growth. Consequently New Zealand has a high percentage of small to medium enterprises (SMEs’) that remain small and fail to realize their growth potential. Alliances have become a core element of today’s business strategies in competing for a market leadership position. This study relates to the use of strategic alliances as an instrument for rapid growth by New Zealand based design led companies (questors). This study examined the experiences of a small number of such companies in relation to their use of strategic alliances. By identifying concepts that positively or adversely affect the likelihood of success of such alliances it is hoped that future questors can benefit from theses findings when developing their own growth strategies. The research approach was to undertake a literature review of the wider topic and postulate a conceptual framework that identifies a number of concepts that are likely to affect success. Validation of the conceptual framework was derived from case studies of questor companies that use or have successfully used strategic alliances as mechanisms to globalize their businesses. The qualitative technique of semi-structured in-depth interviews was used to gather primary data in response to the research questions. This research indicates that the key contributor to the success or failure of alliances is whether all the parties will benefit equitably from the venture and the relative strategic importance of the alliance to the stakeholders. This finding validates and extends on the study conducted by Sengupta, Castaldi, & Silverman (2005). A new finding of special relevance to New Zealand business was that being design led was crucial to attracting the best alliance partners. Strategic alliances are not a panacea for every company and every situation. However through strategic alliances, companies can improve their competitive positioning, gain entry to new markets, supplement critical skills, and share the risk and cost of major development projects. This study highlights the benefits of taking a long term strategic approach to the formation of alliances.

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  • Procurement outsourcing in large New Zealand organisations

    Collins, Tim (2007)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The aim of this research is to identify future plans for outsourcing of procurement in large New Zealand organisations. Outsourcing as a business strategy is growing internationally; organisations are now outsourcing a wider range of business functions than ever before. This trend is expected to continue as organisations look for ways to reduce costs and increase effectiveness. Whilst accounts of successful outsourcing projects are common, many organisations report dissatisfaction with outsourcing experiences. Factors that contribute to successful outsourcing projects include; - Carefully clarifying objectives - Paying close attention to performance management - Actively managing the outsourcing arrangement - Giving responsibility to executives talented with exceptional relationship management skills Outsourcing of business procurement activities has also increased in popularity in recent years with significant international growth predicted. Outsourcing is becoming a more common business activity in New Zealand but little is known about the outsourcing of procurement activities and expected trends in New Zealand. This research considered literature on outsourcing and procurement and surveyed seven large New Zealand organisations chosen from across industry sectors to approximately reflect procurement outsourcing trends. All participants have considered outsourcing procurement activities to varying degrees but prefer to retain control of procurement in-house. All have evaluated outsourcing opportunities however only two used structured outsourcing models to guide this process. This research identified a need for a model to provide a guiding framework for outsourcing procurement projects. Whilst the willingness of the surveyed organisations to consider outsourcing procurement is consistent with the literature on this subject; this study found that New Zealand organisations are significantly more cautious about the potential for outsourcing procurement. This cautiousness is related to concern about the size and capability of the New Zealand market and perceived risks to business performance. This research has limitations in that the sample of seven New Zealand based organisations is small, further research could include a wider sample with a larger number of respondents from participating organisations. This approach enabled the blending of procurement and strategic business outsourcing experiences and provided answers to the research question posed. It also identified opportunities for further research and development of a procurement outsourcing model.

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