38 results for Thesis, Honours Dissertation

  • New Zealand’s legal profession – at a cross-roads?

    Leslie, Nicola K (2005)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    What do you call 100 lawyers at the bottom of the ocean? 'A good start!' New Zealand's legal profession is an easy scapegoat for public criticism. Yet barristers and solicitors are a tightly regulated profession. This paper aims to understand and analyse the current climate within the legal services market in New Zealand. Why is our legal profession under such attack? It seems ironic that a profession which aspires to high ideals could be the subject of such criticism. Yet we rarely consider why such high standards are demanded of a profession. Chapter One will discuss the concept of a profession, and show whether the legal profession in New Zealand can retain such a position. If there is to be any answer to disparaging remarks about lawyers, we must identify and resolve the criticisms of lawyers in New Zealand. Chapter Two will discuss the criticisms directed at barristers and solicitors, to understand why public confidence in our legal profession may be threatened. Ironically the legal profession is subject to a number of different controls. Parliament, the Courts, the profession's own representative bodies at both a national and local level and individual clients all impact on lawyers' practise. Chapter Three will discuss how each institution has responded to the criticisms made of lawyers. Chapter Four will assess any resulting concerns of the profession which remain problematic. This paper will review the legal profession in New Zealand. For all those who practise as barristers and solicitors this is your collective reputation at risk. It is a review with which all lawyers should be particularly concerned. [Introduction]

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  • BECOME SOME BODY: A history of Aerobics, Instruction, and Body Culture at Les Mills World of Fitness from 1980-1992.

    Andrews, Catherine (1995)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    xii, 92 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.

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  • A functional analysis of coral tools from late prehistoric Moloka'i Island, Hawaii.

    Dickson, Hamish (1999)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    1.1 Research Orientation During the course of archaeological fieldwork conducted late in 1978, 425 artifacts relating to fishhook manufacture were recovered from site 38 on Moloka'i Island in the Hawaiian chain. Fishhook manufacturing artifacts include Porities sp coral and echinoid urchin spine abraders, basalt flakes, bone fishhook blanks and bone fishhook debitage. Artifacts deemed coral abraders (precise definition will be given in a latter section) were studied from this site and will be the focus of this dissertation. It is generally believed that coral abraders were used to manufacture fishhooks for the following reasons: 1) Coral artifacts have been found in close association with fishhook manufacture (Emory, Bonk and Sinoto and Sinoto, 1959, Allen, 1992; Suggs 1961; Kirch and Yen 1982 and Buck 1957: and many others). 2) Early ethnographic accounts recorded in the journals of Captain James Cook by Joseph banks (Endeavor botanist), describe native Pacific islanders manufacturing fishhooks using coral files (Hawkesworth, 1773). 3) Use-wear analysis by Allen (1992) indicates that a large number of these tools may have been used to manufacture fishhooks. This dissertation as two main aims: 1) To form a classification system (non-classificatory arrangement; after Dunnel, 1971) for the purpose of ascertaining a functional to coral tools in relation to fishhook manufacture. 2) To devise a standardised system for the measurement of attributes on coral abraders that may aid future functional studies . Chapter one will set the scene, giving details regarding the background of the site under investigation. A definition and basic description of coral tools will be provided along with a review of the literature regarding coral artifacts. Chapter two is divided into two parts. The first part involves a brief review of the literature on classification systems and typology’s. Also in the first section, a justification will be given as to why the particular classification system was used. The second half of chapter two will involve a justification of attributes chosen to form the classification system. The third chapter involves a description of the methods used in measuring attributes and why these attributes were measured in this manor. This will be followed with a detailed description of each artifact class. Each class description will be accompanied with possible functions. The last chapter will be brief, involving conclusions and suggestions for future research. [extract from Introduction]

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  • Geophysical survey of the Paringa River valley, South Westland

    Kilner, Jeremy William (2005)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: [iv], 104 leaves : ill., maps ; 30 cm. + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.) and 1 map (folded). Notes: CD-ROM and map in pockets inside back cover. University of Otago department: Geology. Thesis (B. Sc. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 2005. Includes bibliographic references.

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  • A study of a silver beech stand in the Silver Peaks State Forest

    Armstrong, Patricia (1979)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    20 leaves : ill., map ; 32 cm. Unpublished material. Research paper (B. Sc. (Hons.)) -- University of Otago, 1979.

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  • Packing down the scrum: an historical analysis of the 1981 Springbok tour and the homosexuality issue in the Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand

    Brown, Michael Neal Rowatt (1995)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Physical description: iii, 68 leaves ; 30 cm. Covers the years 1981 through to 1995. Thesis (B.A. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 1995. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 66-68).

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  • Silent Sentinels : The War Trophies of the First New Zealand Expeditionary Force in War and Peace

    Fox, Aaron Patrick (1987)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    The author has made available an updated and illustrated version of this dissertation at: http://www.kiamatetoa.com/drathesis.php

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  • Geology of the southern portion of the Greenhills ultramafic complex

    O’Loughlin, Benjamin (1998)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Exposed along a three kilometre stretch of coastline on the southern extremities of the South Island, New Zealand are a suite of calc-alkaline to tholeiitic ultramafic and gabbroic rocks which form the southern portion of the Greenhills Ultramafic Complex (GUC). This complex consists of a layered series of dunite, wehrlite, olivine-clinopyroxenite and gabbro of Earliest Triassic age (247Ma), which intrude Lower Permian meta-sedimentary lithologies of the Greenhills Group. Accompanying the intrusion of the complex is a narrow contact metamorphic aureole which decreases rapidly in grade from pyroxene-hornfels facies metamorphism, directly adjacent to the body, to regional prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphism, with distance from the contact. The layered series of the GUC is stratigraphically divisible into an upper gabbroic portion of both non-cumulate and cumulate gabbroic rocks, and a lower ultramafic portion of dunite, wehrlite and olivine-clinopyroxenite. The lower ultramafic portion shows well-developed accumulate structures and textures that are typical of stratiform cumulate intrusions. Widespread slumping in the layered series in addition to discrete zones of intense brecciation, faulting, and multiple phases of dyke injection indicate recurring conditions of instability during the evolution of the complex. Textural, mineralogical, and chemical evidence suggests that two gabbro suites comprise the upper gabbroic portion. Namely, a cumulate suite (Shipwreck Gabbro) that is closely related to the lower ultramafic portion, and a non-cumulate (Barracouta Point Gabbro) suite, which is thought to have crystallised from a mixed magma. Whole rock chemistry of the layered series indicates a clear magmatic fractionation trend through dunite to gabbro, consistent with chemical fractionation from a basaltic parental magma. This trend is characterised by a systematic decrease in magnesium content with a concordant increase in silica, aluminium, calcium, and alkalis. A similar fractionation trend is exhibited by the evolution of the primary mineral phases olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase through the layered series. The theory that the GUC may have been derived by dry partial melting of the mantle wedge is supported by the similarity in trace element chemistry between the GUC and N-type Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB). Similarly, the trace element chemistry correlates well with recent basalts and basaltic andesites from the Tonga-Kermadec Island Arc, indicating that present day active ocean-ocean island arc subduction zones may serve as closely representative models for the evolution of remnant arcs such as that inferred for the GUC. The development of a strong tholeiitic to calc-alkaline island arc chemistry in the GUC is typical for magmatic bodies throughout the Brook Street Terrane, which are thought to represent the remnant of an ancient island arc system. A comparison of chemistry between the GUC and that of the Blashke Islands Alaskan-type intrusion from SE Alaska, indicates that these two bodies have been de1ived by fractional crystallisation of a closely similar parental magma, and thus, the GUC can be classified as a Alaskan-type Intrusion. The Greenhills Ultramafic Complex was produced as the result of crystal settling during fractional crystallisation of a basaltic parental magma produced by dry melting of the mantle wedge in an ocean-ocean island arc subduction zone. Modification of the layered body by magmatic slumping, mingling and brecciation and faulting depict recurring conditions of instability within the pluton which is considered typical of island arc subduction zones.

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  • Willi Fels: collector and patron

    Brown, Jennifer Anne (2006)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Physical description: 86, 3, 15 leaves : ill., ports. ; 30 cm. "6 October 2006". Thesis (B.A. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 2008. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Te Hiima : Reverend A. J. Seamer and his Māori mission

    Cervin, Georgia R (2011)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: vi, 59 leaves : ill., ports. ; 30 cm. Notes: Cover title. "October 2011". University of Otago department: History. Thesis (B.A. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 2011. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Big Norm - a principled pragmatist? : the origins and implementation of Norman Kirk's anti-nuclear weapons policies, 1959-1974

    Waite, James David Anthony (1999)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Preface: This essay aims to explore Norman Kirk's anti-nuclear weapons policies. It focuses on policy formulation and diplomatic process within the context of the 'moral and independent' foreign policy. The author does not aim to describe in detail the 1973 ICOJ case, that sought to end French atmospheric nuclear testing. Others have dealt with this event in detail and with great expertise. Instead the essay re-examines all of Kirk's anti-nuclear weapons policies, beginning in 1959 and ending with Kirk's death in August 1974. Kirk's policies continued in various forms after his death. Yet the strong and focused leadership that he provided in the field of disarmament and for humanitarian issues in general ended on 31 August 1974. The death of Kirk was a watershed for the New Zealand Labour Party. The man who dominated its leadership through two electoral defeats and one victory vanished from the political scene. Kirk's life as a mature politician constitutes an era in the history of New Zealand's anti-nuclear movement. His leadership deserves to be evaluated on its own terms.

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  • Attitudes in New Zealand to Scandinavian immigration, 1870-1876

    Grigg, A R (1973)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: vi, 125 leaves ; 30 cm. Notes: Bibliography: l. 120-125.

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  • The declaration of inconsistency with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990

    Curran , Chris (2001)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Section 2(4) of the Criminal Justice Amendment Act (No 2) 1999 is incompatible with the cardinal tenets of a liberal democracy. This Court would be compromising its judicial function if it did not alert Parliament in the strongest possible manner to the constitutional privation of this provision. The arrival of the declaration of inconsistency in Moonen v Film and Literature Board of Review was quite remarkable. There was nothing in the legislative history nor the terms of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 (NZBORA) that explicitly furnished the courts with the jurisdiction to declare that certain statutory limitations of rights are inconsistent with the Act. Concerns were immediately raised about the feasibility and constitutional propriety of the new remedy. The Court of Appeal's traditionally liberal approach to the NZBORA appeared to have led it into error. It will be argued in this paper, however, that the declaration is both a legitimate and practical development. The new remedy promises to augment the democratic processes protecting human rights, facilitate transnational and domestic institutional dialogues on the nature of such rights, and promote a climate of rights-based justification and accountability for state action. Chapter 1 inquires into the significance of the declaration. The nature of the declaration is outlined, and its current legal status considered. The impact of the declaration is then briefly traversed in terms of its implications for the law of remedies, the NZBORA, the constitution, and New Zealand jurisprudence. Chapter 2 then questions whether the declaration is truly a surprising development. In this regard, the legal pedigree of the declaration, the context of expanding NZBORA remedies and the UK statutory analogue are all discussed. Chapter 3 begins the analysis of the legitimacy of the declaration. The inquiry first assesses the fit between the declaration and the broader NZBORA framework. The constitutional relationship between Parliament and the courts then provides a major yardstick in this legitimacy analysis. Democratic objections to the declaration and the possible benefits of a new constitutional order are discussed. Finally, the ramifications of the declaration for the international human rights system are assessed. Chapter 4 concludes the paper by considering the methodology of declaration decision-making. It looks to Canada for guidance in appraising the legitimacy and competency of such decisions, and discerns lessons regarding the employment of appropriate legal and procedural methods in this regard. The final procedural issue discussed is the question of standing. The two dominant standing standards are thus evaluated against the requirements of declaration decisionmaking and the nature of the declaration itself.

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  • Otago 17 - Southland 11 : a social history of Otago rugby in the 1940s

    Lynch, Anthony (1984)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Sport plays a special role in New Zealand society, and one sport, rugby, dominates all others in terms or time, interest and participation. The 'national game' has helped to shape New Zealanders' perceptions or themselves, and the feats or the All Blacks have assisted the formulation of national identity. New Zealanders take pride in their prowess in this physically demanding game, and every Saturday in winter thousands turn out to participate in the game, as players or spectators. This interest is reflected in the great number or accounts or teams, games and trophies, and yet surprisingly little has been written about the role rugby has played in society. This long essay looks at what rugby meant for the people or Otago in the 1940s. In the history or rugby in the province, the 1940s were probably the most interesting and certainly the most important decade. It could be divided into two distinct periods; the war years and the Shield era. Between 1939 and 1945, New Zealand was involved in a major war, and this had an impact on sport as it did every other facet or New Zealand life. The first chapter will look at the impact or the war on the rugby in the province, and at the response or the ORFU, the clubs and the players to the difficulties or wartime rugby. The other important, and distinct, period in the 1940s was the 'Shield Era', when for three glorious years the province held the symbol or national rugby supremacy, the Ranfurly Shield. Otago was at its most formidable in 1948, its centennial year, and the final chapter looks at this period and its significance for the province. During the war years, rugby at the club level was most important, for there were few representative games played. But in the Shield era, Carisbrook hosted a feast of representative football, and all attention focused on the Otago team and its achievements. These two periods were very different because of this, and yet there was much that remained the same. These elements have been incorporated in the middle chapters. The first two look at those who were most actively involved in the game, the players, and the coaches and administrators. The latter two chapters regard the rituals that surrounded the game and were followed by the players and spectators. In writing a social history of rugby in the 1940s one great advantage has been the ability to use oral sources. Oral evidence adds life and vigour to the history of a lively and vigorous game, and where possible I have tried to reproduce this evidence, rather than that of newspapers or minutes, in the text. In conducting the interview I followed the procedure set out in Paul Thompson's The Voice of the Past, and then each interview was transcribed in full. Where possible, evidence was checked against documented sources (mostly newspapers). The 'Saturday' chapter in particular has drawn largely on oral sources, and so perhaps this best of all gives an insight into what the game meant for these men, and the many thousands like them. In all, I have tried not to lose sight of the game itself. As D. Smith and G. Williams in their fine work Fields of Praise noted, the game has too often emerged only as an illustration of something else that was going on in the real world; the intrinsic value of the game's history and the interlocking aspects with 'the real world' have not been appreciated.

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  • Pushing past the confines of femininity : music for women in Dunedin, 1907-1950 : a vehicle for agency, recognition and social connections

    Deuchrass, Andrea (2001)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Music is a form of self-expression, community or national culture, political voice and ethnic identity, among many other things. This dissertation examines the way that music can be a central influence to life for women, in a social structure encompassing the factors of gender and femininity, socio-economics and to a lesser extent, ethnicity. Music can provide a livelihood, form of (small) income and a way of making social connections in a sphere that can function both in and out of the home. It is also an activity where people often cross social boundaries. I have chosen to examine the extent to which music gave women agency, social acceptance and enjoyment in the Otago district from 1907 to 1950.

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  • "Its OK, it's all right, oh yeah" : the 'Dunedin sound'? : an aspect of alternative music in New Zealand 1978-1985

    Robertson, Craig (1991)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    "A Long Essay presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for a Bachelor of Arts (Honours) degree in History"

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  • Soil water regimes of the Glendhu experimental catchments

    Miller, Blair J. (1994)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    The Otago block mountains are important water supply areas with their abundant water yield attributed to conservative water use by narrow-leaved snow tussock (Chionochloa rigida), the dominant vegetation cover of the region. This study looks at three aspects of the soil hydrology of the Glendhu experimental catchments, east Otago, New Zealand: soil water regime changes following afforestation of the tussock grasslands; a comparison of soil water regimes with topographic position in order to identify possible saturated overland flow generation sites; and some characteristics of a peat wetland that is typical of those that occupy gullies in the region. Several sites were set up in the forested and the tussock catchments, and depending on position, contained tensiometer nests, neutron probe access tubes and water table observation wells. Data were collected betw.een 29/3/93 and 19/5/94 and revealed much drier conditions under forest cover, with saturation not occurring in the A horizon throughout the study period. Using tussock catchment sites for topographic comparison, a downslope increase in water content was found on the interfluve, while saturation persisted for longer periods of time at headwall sites where subsurface convergence resulting from the concave planar morphology occurs. Wetland water tables only fluctuated 27.5 cm during the study period, and do not appear to be sustaining the high baseflow that occurs from the catchment.

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  • Characterisation of gold mineralisation and geophysical aided geological mapping in the Old Man Range, Central Otago, New Zealand

    Stephens, Samuel (2014)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Six structurally controlled gold deposits are hosted within two different structural blocks in the Old Man Range area. The mineralised lodes are hosted in normal faults which cut steeply across the host schistosity. In the East structural block, mineralised faults and the prominent joint set strike northwest and cut steeply across greenschist facies TZ III Caples Terrane schist. In the West structural block, mineralised faults and prominent joint sets strike eastwest and cut steeply across upper-greenschist facies TZ IV Wanaka lithologic association schist. These structural blocks are separated by the regional scale Old Man Fault. Orientation of hard rock gold deposits is closely linked to the prominent joints in host schist surrounding the deposits. Mineralised lodes formed along -1 m wide normal fault zones. They are discontinuous but can be traced for up to - l 50m, with variable thickness along strike. The lodes comprise brecciated silicified schist and hydrothermal quartz breccia, and minor quartz veins with abundant arsenopyrite. Open cavities with euhedral quartz crystals are common. Euhedral arsenopyrite occurs in quartz and silicified schist clasts within mineralised zones. Gold occurs as micro-particulate blebs in partly oxidised arsenopyrite, and as coarser free grains within quartz, micaceous laminae, micro-faults, and micro-shears within mineralised rock. Hydrothermal alteration is minor, comprises addition of Si, Au and As, and extends only a few centimetres from the mineralised lodes. Mineralisation may have occurred within a few kilometres of the surface during mid-Late Cretaceous extension (-106-lOlMa), with estimated formation temperatures between 200-350°C. The mineralised structures within the Old Man Range area are similar to other shallow level, post-metamorphic Otago gold deposits. Magnetic, magnetite bearing greenschist has a high magnetic response and can be successfully mapped using total magnetic intensity surveys over the Old Man Range area. Electromagnetic (EM) surveys can be used successfully to map post-metamorphic faults within the Old Man Range area, where they show up as linear conductive anomalies. These geophysical surveys are a useful tool for geologic mapping. However, there is no direct link between the geophysical features and gold mineralisation within the Old Man Range.

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  • Social change and the state : the emergence of a benefit for unmarried mothers in New Zealand

    Elworthy, Sam (1988)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    In 1973 the Labour government introduced a statutory benefit for unmarried mothers, separated and divorced women. It was called the Domestic Purposes Benefit (DPB). Although unmarried mothers were only one group covered by the benefit, constituting around 20% of the total recipients […] the granting of a benefit to these women in particular raises some interesting issues. For centuries unmarried mothers have been stigmatised, being perceived as a threat to the two parent family and traditional bans on sexual activity outside marriage. The granting of a beneift to these women would seem to point to significant changes in social attitudes, especially with regard to sex, marriage and the family.[…] All too often apparently humanitarian gestures seem to have ensured, remarkably well, the stability of capitalist society. But what about the benefit for unmarried mothers? If the introduction of the Domestic Purposes Benefit had any social effects at all they would appear to have been dysfunctional. By instituting a benefit the government gave public sanction to women bearing ex-nuptial children and raising them on their own, even though this practice did seem to threaten the universality of the married two parent family. While applauding the development of a benefit for unmarried mothers I could not understand why a government would introduce it. This problem is the central subject of the essay. [Extract from Introduction]

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  • 'Black Diamond City' a history of Kaitangata mines, miners and community 1860-1913

    Bamford, Tony (1982)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Coal mining is an industry about which people have held and still hold a number of misconceptions. Much of this fact lies purely in lack of understanding for it seems coal mines have always been shunned by the wider community. Isolation however is perhaps an aid to historical analysis for curiosity often prompted investigation even if many of the views expressed were still prejudiced. Similarly, miners, as a group, tended to operate outside the normal social realms of neighbouring societies. But although similarities existed between coal mining communities in a number of areas such as occupational patterns and basic institutions associated with the industry, these settlements cannot be lumped into one basket. Coal mining towns were as different from one another as any non-mining settlements were different from others. This thesis is concerned with such differences. It is concerned also with the pattern of development of such a town. The community, industry and group of people under observation is that of a small town of Kaitangata.[…] Kaitangata was one of the earliest mining settlements in New Zealand, and developed into Otago and Southlands largest coal mine. It had become firmly established by 1880 as a major industry, so that by the turn of the century Kaitangata had become a very permanent settlement, exhibiting quite ‘normal’ demographic characteristics.[…] [Extract from Introduction]

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