754 results for Thesis, 2009

  • Charles Begg and Company Limited : the story of music in New Zealand is the history of Begg's

    Gleeson, Jean Clare (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 143 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "December 2009". University of Otago department: History

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  • Effect of estradiol on the ovarian surface epithelium in older mice

    Gulliver, Linda Shirley Mabelle (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    2 v. (xxxii, 573 leaves) :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "August 2009". University of Otago department: Anatomy and Structural Biology

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  • The gift of the other: Levinas, Derrida, and a theology of hospitality

    Shepherd, Andrew Philip (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Despite the celebration of 'difference' and the rhetoric of 'connectedness', the so-called 'global village' of the early twenty-first century is far from a peaceful and harmonious reality. Powerful ideological discourses such as the market and the political 'war on terror' shape a world in which many, classified as Others, are excluded. Conceived of as abstract commodities competing for limited resources, or worse, as potential 'terrorists' coming to 'destroy civilization', Others are seen as threats. In this world of exclusion and hostility the Christian church is summoned to continue to witness to the good news of God's gracious hospitality. The practice of 'hospitality' -what Christine Pohl refers to as 'an essential part of Christian identity' - is, however, rendered problematic due to the emasculation and distortion of the term by the prevailing ideologies of our time. To engage in this historical and life-giving practice faithfully therefore requires a theological rehabilitation of the concept of 'hospitality'. This thesis undertakes this rehabilitative task in two ways. Firstly, the work engages with the work of prominent French philosophers Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida. In contrast to Cartesian western philosophical thought which has given primacy to the cogito, Levinas and Derrida claim that the self is constituted by the call of the Other. Instead of disregard or fear of the Other, their 'philosophies of hospitality' assert that authentic human existence is characterised by an 'infinite responsibility' before the face of the Other. While finding rich resources in Levinasian and Derridean thought, there are weaknesses and limitations in their respective understandings of selfhood, inter-human relationality, eschatology and teleology, and the differential ontology upon which their ethical philosophies are grounded. Therefore, while continuing the dialogue with Levinas and Derrida, section two of this thesis offers an explicitly theological account of 'hospitality'. Whereas Levinasian-Derridean thought implies that tension and hostility are both ontologically intrinsic and insurmountable, the Christian doctrines of Trinity, creation, and sin offer an ontology of primordial communion in which hostility is understood as arising from the failure of humanity to live in communion with others. This hostility is overcome in the 'once for all' death of Jesus. This sacrificial and substitutionary action, far from sacralising violence and turning suffering into a virtue, prevails over human enmity and offers the true form of personhood. Those who through faith accept this 'gift of God' are indwelt by the presence of the Spirit of the resurrected Christ and incorporated into a new form of sociality - the ecclesia. The alienated self, discomforted by the disturbing Other, undergoes a makeover and is transformed into an ecclesial self; expanded to 'make room' for otherness. Fear is replaced by love, and appropriative desire gives way to mutual gift-exchange. Undergoing this gradual transformation, the ecclesia is empowered to participate in God's redemptive purposes being enacted in the world and thus becomes a witness to God's hospitality.

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  • Assessing the impact of human disturbance on penguins

    Ellenberg, Ursula (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xix, 257 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm.

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  • Spirituality in New Zealand hospice care

    Egan, Richard Michael Martin (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xv, 362 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "July 2009". University of Otago department: General Practice

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  • Practising Tamariki 'Āngai : Mangaia's informal island adoption

    Dodson, Marsa A (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xv, 410 p. : ill., maps ; 30 cm. Notes: University of Otago department: Social Work and Community Development. "21 August 2009." Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • "Body snatching" in contemporary Aotearoa/New Zealand : a legal conflict between cultures

    Brandt, Bettina (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The main purpose of this thesis is to consider whether legal sanctions would be capable of deterring the practice of "body snatching," and, if so, whether the law should be reformed in New Zealand to clarify the legal situation of ownership in, and burial of, a dead body. The project will involve an analysis of existing law, proposed law changes, tikanga Māori, and comparative law elements. It will examine and synthesise primary and secondary legal sources, including relevant case law and statutory law. More specifically, the research aim is to provide an explanation of the legal aspects of the "body snatching" issue within Aotearoa/New Zealand, as it occurs within bicultural Māori and Pākehā families. [Extract from Introduction]

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  • Open population capture-recapture models and diabetes in Otago

    Cameron, Claire (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xiv, 207 leaves :ill., ; 30 cm Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Mathematics and Statistics

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  • The search for 'self' for lifestyle travellers

    Cohen, Scott Allen (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: ix, 186 leaves : maps. ; 30 cm. Notes: "February 27th 2009". University of Otago department: Tourism. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Otago, 2009. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • The protection of terrestrial biological diversity and climate change : an environmental law perspective

    Hederich, Wiebke (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xiii, 182 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "16 October 2009". University of Otago department: Law

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  • Kia Whakamaramatia Mahi Titi : Predictive measures for understanding harvest impacts on Sooty Shearwaters (Puffinus griseus)

    Clucas, Rosemary (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    1 v. (various pagings) :ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "July 26, 2009". University of Otago department: Mathematics and Statistics

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  • Alleviating fuel poverty in NZ through improving the energy efficiency of the residential sector

    Callaú, Maria Fernanda (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 175 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Physics

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  • A tectonic synthesis of the Dun Mountain Ophiolite Belt

    Jugum, Dushan (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    The Dun Mountain Ophiolite Belt (DMOB) is an Early-Permian ophiolite sequence exposed in the South Island of New Zealand. The ophiolite is overlain by the thick deep-marine sedimentary Maitai Group. The Alpine Fault divides the DMOB into two sections, one in Nelson and the other in Southland. The DMOB is divided into three different units based on lithology and geochemistry: the Livingstone Ophiolite, which is a typical ophiolite sequence dipping sub-vertically and facing west; the Otama Mélange, a deformed ocean-floor assemblage with no ultramafics or serpentinites and a greater amount of felsic rocks than the other two units; and the Patuki Mélange, a highly deformed ophiolite structurally beneath the Livingstone Ophiolite. The Lvingstone Ophiolite has three phases of igneous activity. The first phase is represented by cumulates, massive gabbro, and extensive pillow lavas. It has a MORB-like geochemistry with a subtle above-subduction signature. The age of this phase is 277.6 ± 3.3 Ma using U/Pb in zircon. The second phase locally intrudes the first with dykes which are feeders for extensive non-pillowed lava flows of variable thickness. The age of the second phase (275.2 ± 5.4 Ma) cannot be distinguished from the first. The second phase has a stronger above-subduction geochemical signature than the first phase. The third phase comprises felsic and intermediate dykes that cut the first two phases and intrude into the sediments overlying the DMOB. This phase has not been directly dated but has the same geochemistry as the felsic rocks in the Otama Mélange. The igneous rocks of the Otama Mélange are 50% felsic and have an age of 269.3 ± 4.5 Ma. The mafic and felsic rocks from the Otama Mélange have a strong above-subduction geochemistry, but are not typical of arcs. The Patuki Mélange contains both MORB-like and OIB igneous rocks in a serpentinite matrix. The MORB-like Patuki Mélange is similar to the first stage of igneous activity in the Livingstone Ophiolite. Sediment blocks within the Patuki Mélange have been correlated with the Maitai Group, based on their petrology and detrital zircon age pattern. These sediments have a youngest detrital zircon age of Late Permian through to the Early Triassic. The Maitai Group sediment are distal in character within the Patuki Mélange and more proximal above the Livingstone Ophiolite. I infer that the Livingstone Ophiolite represents a fore-arc, and the Otama Mélange a localization of the Livingstone ophiolites stage three igneous activity in that fore-arc (possibly due to ridge subduction). The Patuki Mélange is either an off-scraping of a subducted slab or part of the trench wall of the above-subduction crust. The DMOB may have been part of the same ocean-crust as the Brook Street Terrane during its formation, but there is no specific evidence for this. Detrital zircons from the Caples Terrane are almost exclusively Triassic in age. The Maitai Group may have some time overlap with the oldest Murihiku Terrane. The DMOB is identical in geology and age to the Yakuno Ophiolite in Japan which may have once been part of the same subduction-zone before the opening of the Neo-Tethys. Detrital zircons from the Aspiring Terrane have a Jurassic age 154.1 ± 2.0 Ma, which constrains the age of the metamorphism of the Haast Schist. The DMOB has been highly deformed with evidence for extensional structure reactivated in compression on the sea-floor during igneous activity; however, most of the observed internal deformation in the DMOB is Cenozoic in age. The serpentinites are completely overprinted by the oblique compression through New Zealand since the Miocene.

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  • Identification of the floral source of New Zealand honeys

    Petchell, Laura Eleanor (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Depending on the nectar source, honey is either unifloral (derived mostly from one plant type), or polyfloral (derived from multiple plant types). Unifloral honey has characteristic sensory properties, and is therefore of greater commercial value. Currently, identification of floral source involves pollen counting, a specialised and labour intensive process. The current research was aimed at developing an alternative, rapid, chemistry-based method of floral identification. The aroma of honey depends on volatile compounds present; these may be derived from the plant from which nectar was taken. Therefore by identifying volatiles in honey it could be possible to identify floral source. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) is a technique that is useful for the headspace analysis of volatile compounds; when coupled with GC-MS it provides a powerful tool for fingerprinting volatiles in honey. GC-MS chromatograms of ten New Zealand unifloral honey types were obtained after headspace SPME extraction. Statistical analysis of the GC-MS chromatographic data was used to discriminate between floral types. Probability plots were used to identify compounds indicative of floral source; this method discriminated between honey types with 90% success. Hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to study the structure of the data. Learning algorithms in Weka (machine-learning software) were used to build models of data to classify honey types. The logistic model tree algorithm classified 89.8% of samples correctly. Such a model has the potential to be used to classify future honey samples, once further samples have been tested to validate the model.

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  • How does the concept of guanxi help foreign managers do business in China?

    Jiang, Nanqian (Katie) (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    China's fast growing market potential is undoubted. However entering China has never been an easy task for foreign firms and business practitioners. Not only the complex market environment, but also the complex business relationship networks in another word, Guanxi make it difficult for foreign firms to operate profitably. The purpose of this study is to explore some major issues of Guanxi concept, and to provide some practical solutions for foreign managers to use when dealing with Guanxi in their businesses. Both qualitative research and quantitative research were carried out. The author interviewed nine Chinese and foreign managers and surveyed hundreds of respondents in several industries. The findings confirm Guanxi's important role in Chinese society and business world. This study also discovers some major practical issues that could influence quality of Guanxi, either positively or negatively, which gives foreign managers great direction on initiation and maintenance of their Guanxi network. The findings suggest that learning some Chinese culture and having a reliable Chinese partner have positive effect on building Guanxi networks. However, this study shows a quite different result on future role of Guanxi compared with existing literatures: the role of Guanxi would either not change, or increase in China in the future. In addition, foreign managers need to be aware that Guanxi is indeed important, but it does not mean everything in market activities, the core marketing principles are always essential in any market, including China.

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  • The experiences of international and New Zealand women in New Zealand higher education

    Anderson, Vivienne (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis reports on an ethnographic research project that explored the experiences and perspectives of a group of women in New Zealand higher education, including international and New Zealand students and partners of international students. The study had two aims. The first was to disrupt the inattention to gender and to students' partners and families in New Zealand international education research and policy. The second was to problematise Eurocentric assumptions of (predominantly Asian) international students' 'cultural difference', and of New Zealanders' homogenised sameness. The theoretical framework for the study was informed by a range of conceptual tools, including feminist, critical theory, post-structural, and postcolonial perspectives. In drawing on feminist perspectives, the study was driven by a concern with acknowledging the importance and value of women's lives, looking for women where they are absent from policy and analysis, and attending to the mechanisms through which some women's lives are rendered invisible in internationalised higher education. In considering these mechanisms and women's lives in relation to them the study also drew on post-structural notions of discourse, power, and agency. It explored how dominant discourses in internationalised higher education reveal and reproduce historically-grounded relations of power that are intentionally or unintentionally performed, subverted and/or resisted by women and those they encounter. Using Young's (1990, 2000) approach to critical theory, the study also considered alternative ways of constructing internationalised higher education that were suggested in women's accounts. As a critical feminist ethnography the study was shaped by my theoretical framework (above), critical literature on heterogeneous social groups, and feminist concerns with relationship, reciprocity and power in the research process. Fieldwork took place during 2005 and 2006 and involved two aspects: the establishment and maintenance of an intercultural group for women associated with a higher education institution, and 28 interviews with 20 women over two years. Interviewees were recruited through the group and included eight international students, nine New Zealand students and three women partners of international students. Study findings challenged the assumption that international and local students are distinct and oppositional groups. They also highlighted the importance of recognising the legitimate presence of international students' partners and accompanying family members at all levels in higher education. International and New Zealand women alike found the intercultural group a useful source of social and practical support and information, and a point of access to other sources of support and information. Women reflected on moving between many different kinds of living and learning contexts, highlighting the importance of: clear processes and pathways for accessing information and practical support when experiencing transition; teaching that is engaging, effective, and responsive; and opportunities to develop connections with other people both on and off campus. Rather than revealing clear patterns of difference or sameness across women, the study highlighted the importance of policy, research, teaching and support practices that are open and responsive to women's actual viewpoints and needs, and that neither re-entrench difference nor assume sameness.

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  • The role of colour and odour in fruit selection by diurnal, endemic skinks (Oligosoma) in Aotearoa / New Zealand

    Marshall, Jane Elizabeth (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    The flora of Aotearoa/ New Zealand has evolved in association with birds and lizards as the dominant frugivores and seed dispersers. There is a wide range of ripe fruit colours within the native fleshy-fruited plants spanning the visible light spectrum from red to violet, with the notable exception of green. The evolution of fleshy-fruit and fruiting related trait, may be a result of the selection pressures exerted by different frugivore guilds. This study was conducted to ascertain if endemic diurnal lizards, Oligosoma species (Scincidae: Lacertilia), display features associated with visual based foraging, colour sensitivity and colour preferences, which are necessary conditions to infer a co-evolutionary mutualism between fleshy-fruited plant species and lizards as seed dispersers, which may have influenced the evolution of fruit colour. Many lizards have exceptional colour vision, with the ability to see a wide range of the visual light spectrum from short wave ultra violet to long wave red. They are able to discriminate all aspects of colour: hue, brightness and saturation. Fruit colour within Coprosma (Rubiaceae), is extremely variable, between and within species. The study of fruit colour preferences within this genus and particularly within species with polymorphic fruit colour provides a valuable comparison of frugivore preference to fruit with little inter and intraspecific variation, therefore minimising potentially confounding factors due to phylogeny. Fruit-colour choice experiments were conducted offering fruit from two colour categories based on postulated frugivore preferences; red and red orange fruit has been associated with avian frugivores whilst white and pale fruit has been associated with lizard frugivory in New Zealand. Experiments were conducted both ex-situ, in environmentally controlled laboratories and in-situ at Macraes Flat, Otago. Pilot trials indicated that the background colour on which fruit were presented was important in fruit choice and consequentially, all fruit were offered on a background which provided contrast to both fruit colour categories. The laboratory trials showed some weak evidence for a preference of white and pale blue fruit however, in-situ trials showed a strong preference for white over red fruit. Field studies were conducted to ascertain the composition of fleshy-fruit in the diets of lizards and the results were consistent with those expected for a generalist omnivore; many of the small fruits available to lizards were consumed however, the results indicated that plant abundance does not adequately explain fruit consumption at this field site. A preference index showed that white and pale fruited plants, Melicytus alpinus and Coprosma spp., were preferred over more abundant orange and red fruited plants. Fruit odour was investigated to determine if fruit choice was mediated primarily by visual cues as opposed to odour cues. Fruit choice trials with the fruit concealed from view indicated that fruit choice was based primarily on visual cues in Oligosoma skinks. It is concluded that lizards demonstrate the necessary conditions to infer that as frugivores, they may have influenced the evolution of fruit colour and that within the open habitats of Aotearoa/ New Zealand, the shrubs, particularly the divaricate shrubs may have provided sufficient environmental conditions to establish a mutualism between plants and lizards resulting in the evolution of small, white and other low chroma fruits.

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  • Conduct of counsel causing or contributing to a miscarriage of justice

    O'Driscoll, Stephen James (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    The Crimes Act 1961 and the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 provide that a person accused of a criminal offence in New Zealand has the right to be represented at trial by counsel. The purpose of representation by counsel is to protect the accused's interests; ensure that the accused is able to present their defence to the Court; ensure that the accused receives a fair trial; and ensure that the accused is not the subject of a miscarriage of justice. It is implicit that criminal defence counsel must be competent if they are to be effective advocates on behalf of their clients. If counsel is not competent, there is a risk that counsel's acts or omissions may cause or contribute to a miscarriage of justice. The Crimes Act 1961 allows an accused to appeal against their conviction on the basis that they have been the subject of a miscarriage of justice through the conduct of their counsel. The thesis analyses the Supreme Court decision of R v Sungsuwan that sets out the test that an appellate court must consider when deciding to allow an appeal based on the conduct of counsel. The thesis examines 239 Court of Appeal decisions between 1996 and 2007 that have considered appeals from jury trials where at least one of the grounds of appeal was that defence counsel caused or contributed to a miscarriage of justice. The thesis notes the increasing trend to use quot;conduct of counselquot; as a ground of appeal. In 1996 there were 4 appeals; in 2006 there were 43 such appeals and in 2007 there were 29 appeals. During the period under review the Court of Appeal allowed the appeal and specifically held that counsel's conduct, either alone or in combination with other grounds, caused or contributed to a miscarriage of justice in 41 cases. The thesis analyses the common complaints made by an accused against trial counsel and the common areas where the Court of Appeal upheld complaints against counsel. The thesis takes into account the Lawyers and Conveyancers Act 2006 and the Lawyers and Conveyancers (Lawyer: Conduct and Client Care) Rules 2008 that came into existence on 1 August 2008. The new legislation places particular emphasis on the obligations of counsel to uphold the rule of law and to facilitate the administration of justice in New Zealand. Counsel also has an obligation to protect the interests of their clients. The thesis concludes that the plethora of cases coming before the Court of Appeal, and the number of appeals allowed by the Court, demonstrate defence counsel do not always protect the interests of their clients and can cause or contribute to a miscarriage of justice. The thesis makes a number of recommendations that may reduce the risk of both an accused appealing on the basis on the conduct of counsel and an appeal being allowed on the basis of the conduct of counsel. In particular, it is suggested that there should be greater degree of co-operation between the New Zealand Law Society and the Legal Services Agency to ensure the maintenance of high standards among criminal defence lawyers.

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  • Alpine fault pseudotachylytes

    Ritchie, Samuel David (2009)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    xvii, 171 leaves :col. ill., maps30 cm Includes bibliographical references. "October 2009". University of Otago department: Geology

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  • The role of social-pragmatic cues in word learning: a neural network model

    Caza, Gregory Andrew (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Human infants begin to produce speech at the beginning of the second year of life. Some theories propose that language is acquired by simply recognising statistical properties in linguistic input. Other hypotheses consider the interactive environments in which humans are raised, looking for links between emerging social skills and word learning. The social-pragmatic theory of language acquisition suggests that the foundation of word learning is an ability to read the intentions of another, especially the intention to communicate (Akhtar and Tomasello, 2000). The theory posits a special role for the ability to respond to joint attention, a form of intention recognition which has been shown to facilitate word learning (Baldwin, 1993). Social-pragmatic theory argues that the cognitive abilities that develop in the second year of life are not merely coincidental, but are an essential component of language acquisition. The first goal of this thesis is to develop a neural network model to investigate word learning by implementing key concepts of the social-pragmatic theory. Cognitive skills that develop in the second year of life are shown to facilitate word learning, with the model reproducing characteristics of the ’vocabulary spurt’ that can be seen around 18 months of age (O’Grady, 2005). The second goal is to relate the model to current neurobiological research. The neural correlates of intention recognition and lexical retrieval are tentatively defined, permitting a discussion of the brain regions common to both processes. The prefrontal cortex, in particular, is discussed to investigate how its general functions could be harnessed by mechanisms for word learning and intention recognition. One novel contribution of the model is to tie together joint attention and word learning using a rewardbased learning scheme.

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