914 results for Thesis, 2010

  • Analysis of fungal inteins

    Bokor, Annika Anna Maria (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xxvi, 298 leaves :col. ill ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Biochemistry. "November 1, 2010"

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  • Remineralisation of decalcified tooth enamel consequent to orthodontic treatment

    Lam, Emily (2010)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xx, 253 leaves : col. ill ; 30 cm. Notes: “A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Clinical Dentistry in Orthodontics, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand”. "August 2010". University of Otago department: Oral Sciences. Thesis ( D. Clin. Dent. )--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • No substantial miscarriage of justice : the history and application of the proviso to Section 385(1) of the Crimes Act 1961

    Downs, Mathew David (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 390 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "September 2010. University of Otago department: Law

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  • Effects of ocean acidification on fertilisation and early development in polar and temperate marine invertebrates

    Ericson, Jessica (2010)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    243 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliography. University of Otago department: Marine Science.

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  • Tourism policy implementation in the Philippines, 1973-2009

    de la Santa, Edieser (2010)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xv, 362 leaves : ill., maps ; 30 cm. Notes :University of Otago department: Tourism. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Perception in the rural designing within the rural New Zealand landscape

    Borsos, Chanelle J. (2010)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This project explores how perception can be used to facilitate design within the rural landscape of New Zealand. From the earliest days of European settlement, the environmental history of New Zealand's rural landscapes has been a record of confrontation of image and reality. Historically ideas on Landscape have been painted, and through this, societies form landscape taste and values. When European settlers came to New Zealand they used these perceptions when forming their landscapes and this explains how they transformed from wild wilderness to what we see today. The current theory on landscape perception is that it is necessary to gain a better understanding of people's values and landscape tastes when designing in these landscapes . It is not simply a matter of imposing any design on these communities as they will not be embraced. This is the key to sustaining new landscape ideas as scenic perception of landscape is divorced from an understanding of ecological processes. This project reveals that If landscape architects understand what underpins aesthetic preferences in terms of perception and respond with a creative articulation of environmentally sustainable landscape designs, in a way which allows people to maintain a connection with it, the land­ scape will be more resilient. For landscape architecture , it represents a challenge to the popular preferences for the ornamental , groomed and controlled landscapes which reflected the legacy of designers such as Capability Brown and Frederick Law Olmsted. Project site: South Head Kaipara, north of Helensville.

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  • The Burton Brothers studio : commerce in photography and the marketing of New Zealand, 1866-1898

    Whybrew, Christine M. (2010)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    The Burton Brothers studio of Dunedin, the most renowned ofNew Zealand's colonial photographers, was among the first to present photographs of colonial New Zealand to international audiences. From 1866 to 1898 this studio produced a stock of photographic images that recorded the industrial, social and political progress of the colony. Burton Brothers photographs were produced in series and included topographical views of locations, such as Milford Sound and the King Country, or were targeted to specific projects or events, such as the eruption of Mount Tarawera and the government survey of the Sutherland Falls. Alfred Henry Burton, the studio's director, accompanied the Union Steam Ship Company's first tourist excursion to Fiji, Samoa and Tonga, and photographs from this series and those of King Country Maori are valued as ethnographic records of indigenous peoples. Now prized as documentary artefacts in institutional collections, the "truth" value of these photographs is compromised by their production as marketable commodities. By examining the intended purpose that informed the creation and distribution of these photographs, this thesis disrupts conventional interpretations of Burton Brothers photographs as historical records. This thesis examines photographs as physical objects, prioritising the material properties of the photograph over image content. This methodology is informed and guided by the close and systematic study of Burton Brothers photographs in their original formats, including albumen prints, cartes de visite, stereographs, lantern slides, albums and the studio's original wet collodion and gelatin dry plate negatives. All prints released by the studio were inscribed with the firm's trademark (brand), negative number and a descriptive caption. Each series of photographs was promoted by a non-illustrated catalogue, containing an excerpt from the photographer's diary or other written narrative that operated as contextual description for the photographs. These textual elements function to direct interpretation in accordance with the studio's commercial agenda and in alignment with contemporary social and political ideologies. The impression of New Zealand circulated by Burton Brothers photographs was derived more from the text accompanying and overlaying these photographic products than the image content. This "textual overlay" allows insight into the studio's purpose m producing, releasing and marketing photographic products. Through this, the context of production is analysed and Burton Brothers photographs are examined as products of commercial endeavour, accessing a greater understanding of the commercial photography trade in nineteenth century New Zealand.

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  • Combined map personalisation algorithm for delivering preferred spatial features in a map to everyday mobile device users

    Bookwala, Avinash Turab (2010-06-18)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    In this thesis, we present an innovative and novel approach to personalise maps/geo-spatial services for mobile users. With the proposed map personalisation approach, only relevant data will be extracted from detailed maps/geo-spatial services on the fly, based on a user’s current location, preferences and requirements. This would result in dramatic improvements in the legibility of maps on mobile device screens, as well as significant reductions in the amount of data being transmitted; which, in turn, would reduce the download time and cost of transferring the required geo-spatial data across mobile networks. Furthermore, the proposed map personalisation approach has been implemented into a working system, based on a four-tier client server architecture, wherein fully detailed maps/services are stored on the server, and upon a user’s request personalised maps/services, extracted from the fully detailed maps/services based on the user’s current location, preferences, are sent to the user’s mobile device through mobile networks. By using open and standard system development tools, our system is open to everyday mobile devices rather than smart phones and Personal Digital Assistants (PDA) only, as is prevalent in most current map personalisation systems. The proposed map personalisation approach combines content-based information filtering and collaborative information filtering techniques into an algorithmic solution, wherein content-based information filtering is used for regular users having a user profile stored on the system, and collaborative information filtering is used for new/occasional users having no user profile stored on the system. Maps/geo-spatial services are personalised for regular users by analysing the user’s spatial feature preferences automatically collected and stored in their user profile from previous usages, whereas, map personalisation for new/occasional users is achieved through analysing the spatial feature preferences of like-minded users in the system in order to make an inference for the target user. Furthermore, with the use of association rule mining, an advanced inference technique, the spatial features retrieved for new/occasional users through collaborative filtering can be attained. The selection of spatial features through association rule mining is achieved by finding interesting and similar patterns in the spatial features most commonly retrieved by different user groups, based on their past transactions or usage sessions with the system.

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  • An exploratory study of facilitators and barriers to the primary care management of those with high cardiovascular risk

    Doolan-Noble, Fiona (2010)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Background In 2003 the New Zealand Guidelines on the screening and management of patients for cardiovascular risk were published, with a revised handbook for primary healthcare staff updated in 2009. Several studies however have identified a significant gap between the guideline recommendations and current practice. This study was initiated to investigate the possible reasons for the evidence-practice gap. Aim and objectives The aim of this research study was to explore how primary health care teams manage those at high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and what changes could be made that would enhance management. The study objectives were: • To explore how those found to be at high risk of a cardiovascular event are managed in primary care; • To determine what facilitates and hinders CVD risk management at practice level in the current primary health care environment in New Zealand; • To establish what strategies and support providers would like to enhance the current management of those at high risk. Methods A qualitative approach was utilised for this study using focus groups for the collection of relevant information and opinions. Following the review of the literature an interview schedule was developed to guide the focus group discourse. The selection of the focus groups was guided by a sampling frame which ensured that they were drawn from a variety of settings. Focus groups were digitally recorded and the recordings transcribed. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) was used as a framework to guide consideration of the literature review findings as well as the process of analysing the text data. The text data was analysed using a general inductive approach which resulted in the emergence of key themes. Findings There was a high level of conformity between the findings from the focus group and the literature review but some additional issues did emerge. The self management domain and the delivery system domain of the CCM dominated both the findings from the literature and the themes from the focus groups. The decision support domain appears to have a moderate impact on optimal management of cardiovascular risk, both in the literature and from the focus group findings. Participants in the focus groups identified more barriers to optimal management of those at high cardiovascular risk related to the health system organisation domain, than emerged from the literature. Surprisingly they identified no barriers or facilitators to the use of community resources to assist them in supporting individuals with lifestyle behaviour changes. Conclusion This study, elicited new perspectives from New Zealand primary healthcare staff, relevant to issues surrounding the management of patients at high cardiovascular risk. The research has elucidated drivers of sub-optimal management and highlighted solutions available to address the issues within the current New Zealand primary health care environment.

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  • Regulation of Cytochrome bd Expression in Mycobacterium smegmatis

    Weimar, Marion Ricarda (2010)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The metabolism and generation of energy by the majority of pathogenic bacteria in the host remains enigmatic and emerging evidence suggests that the identification of essential bacterial metabolic pathways that have no human counterparts may represent a virtually untapped source of novel drug targets for antibiotic development. The aim of this study was to determine how mycobacteria metabolize and generate energy microaerobically. To identify potential regulatory circuits that control the response to low oxygen tension, we targeted the enzyme cytochrome bd oxidase, purportedly involved in the generation of energy under these conditions, and isolated mutants that fail to activate expression of this enzyme. Instead of finding regulators of cytochrome bd oxidase, our screen revealed enzymes and regulators involved in redox homeostasis and defence against electrophiles (oxidative stress). We discovered ProR, a novel regulator of proline dehydrogenase and 1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase, two enzymes involved in proline degradation. Evidence is presented that ProR is essential for growth on proline as a sole carbon source and that a proR mutant experiences DNA damage due to methylglyoxal, an endogenously produced toxic intermediate of glycolysis and glycerol metabolism. It is shown that proline confers resistance to methylglyoxal. Furthermore, we characterized the sodium/proline symporter PutP as a high-affinity transporter for proline and show that it is the major uptake system for proline in Mycobacterium smegmatis. A new model for methylglyoxal detoxification in Mycobacteria is presented.

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  • The Canterbury and West Coast District Health Boards' Professional Development and Recognition Programme for Nurses: A Comparative Study of Participants and Non Participants

    Bloomer, Helen Margaret Parnell (2010)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Background: In response to recruitment and retention issues, professional development recognition programmes for nurses have become widespread internationally. In addition, in New Zealand the introduction of the Health Practitioners Competence Assurance Act (2003) with subsequent competency based practising certificates for nurses, and the signing of the Multi Employer Collective Agreement (NZNO, 2004) resulted in the mandatory introduction of professional development recognition programmes within District Health Boards. However, little research exists to demonstrate who is participating in these programmes and what the motivating factors and barriers to participation are. Objectives: The purpose of this research was to identify the demographic characteristics of both participants and non-participants in the Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB) and West Coast District Health Board (WCDHB) Professional Development and Recognition Programme (PDRP) and to explore the motivating factors and barriers to participation in this programme through the use of the Perceived Value of Certification Tool© (PVCT). Method: Female registered nurses permanently employed by the CDHB, who were eligible to voluntarily participate in the PDRP were randomly selected to anonymously complete two written questionnaires. The first questionnaire sought demographic information while the second was the Perceived Value of Certification Tool (PVCT©). Over a one month period 399 questionnaires were sent out with 245 usable returns received. Results: No significant demographic differences between programme participants and non participants were found. However, participants in the PDRP had higher levels of agreement with the value statements which comprised the PVCT than did non-participants. Value statements related to intrinsic motivation rated more highly than those related to extrinsic motivation for both PDRP participants and non participants, suggesting that the desire to participate in the programme is largely internally motivated. Exceptions were the motivation of increased pay, and exemption from Nursing Council of New Zealand audit. Barriers to participation are primarily related to the process itself, with unwieldiness and the time required to complete a submission often cited as reasons for non participation. Conclusion: Registered Nurse participants in the programme represent a cross section of the CDHB nursing workforce. Participation in the programme appears to be internally motivated and non participation appears to be largely related to the perception that the submission process is onerous, therefore, future education and development aimed at increasing uptake of the programme needs to address these issues. It would seem that simplifying the submission process, and the evidence required would be the single most effective method of increasing participation in the programme.

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  • Tourism Recovery after the 2009 Tsunami in Samoa

    Tagomoa-Isara, Tupe (2010)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    On September 29th 2009, the 8.3 magnitude earthquake off of the southern coast of Samoa in the Pacific Ocean generated massive tsunami waves resulting in severe devastation for many villages and contamination of their coastal areas. The disaster greatly impacted the tourism infrastructure, economy, environment, water quality and psychological aspect of the residents in the affected areas. The aim of this thesis was to examine the recovery of tourism after the September 2009 tsunami. The objectives were to: 1) explore the immediate impacts tourism businesses suffered from the tsunami; 2) identify the emergency responses that occurred in the aftermath; 3) explain the issues and challenges arising from the recovery process and; 4) examine the strategies and opportunities that tourism operators and relevant organisations are using to recover tourism in the district. This involves examining the preparedness programs for future disasters. A qualitative approach was used to accomplish the objectives of the study. Four tourism businesses that were affected in the Safata district were selected for this research. Experiences and views of the affected tourism businesses were presented and analysed through media reports and document review, semi-structured interviews and site observations. Interviews were also carried out with key informants from relevant tourism organisations that were involved in the tsunami response and recovery efforts. This author believes that this is the first tourism study carried out on tourism recovery after the 2009 tsunami and specifically a study which presents a tourism case study from the Safata district. It intends to provide insight on the issues facing the tourism businesses hoping to recover, as well as finding out their preparedness programs and disaster plans for future disasters. Results show that there was no disaster plan for the tourism industry before the tsunami. The tsunami has caused severe damage to tourism businesses such as premises being demolished, equipment destruction, psychological effects and environmental damage. Results also show the rapid response of the local communities, government and overseas agencies. It was also clear that although the affected tourism businesses did not have any disaster plans before the tsunami, they showed willingness to develop and become proactive in implementing a disaster plan as a means of preparing for future disasters. This research will help tourism businesses and relevant organisations set strategic actions or procedures towards developing a disaster plan to prepare for and mitigate future disasters.

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  • Benedict, Balance and the Deans: The Benedictine concept of balance offers a way for a dean to survive and thrive in an Anglican cathedral today.

    Nelson, Frank (2010)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Introduction : More than twenty years ago I was introduced to the Rule of Benedict by Esther de Waal. It was a revelation to me that centuries ago (Benedict’s dates are 480 – 547 AD) a man had the vision to set out a way of living a balanced life for God in the midst of apparent chaos. While the Rule remains the basic underlying rule for western monasticism I realized too that the Anglican Church owes an immense amount to Benedict. My experience as a priest suggests that Anglicans have drifted towards a management, and increasingly congregational, style of being church, with emphasis on numbers and personality of clergy. The Rule suggests we may have lost something worthwhile. There is something unexpectedly contemporary about the challenge of the three vows – obedience, stability and continual conversion – to today’s church, and especially today’s cathedrals. One English cathedral that I am aware of has specifically tied itself to Benedictine principles. While only one model of cathedral, this indicates that Benedict’s vision continues to be relevant today. As I thought about a topic to fulfill the requirements for the M Min research essay I found myself increasingly drawn to asking whether the Rule of Benedict might have some suggestions for a busy dean trying to cope with the many demands on his/her time. This thinking was further encouraged in the words of a university lecturer who, on introducing me to his class of business administration students, reminded them that business models are relatively recent, often built either on that of the church or the military. Drawing on my own experience in a number of cathedrals, and the reading and talking I have done (including meeting regularly with my New Zealand dean colleagues and a small group of international deans over the past few years), a thesis topic developed. The Benedictine concept of balance offers a way for a dean to survive and thrive in an Anglican cathedral today. This topic would give me the chance to • reflect on my own ministry as a priest over a period of more than thirty years (much of it in cathedrals) • delve deeply into the Rule of Benedict and some of today’s commentators on, and practitioners of, the Rule • look critically at the way in which the Rule has influenced some of the decisions and practices I have made as Dean of Wellington • through a process of interviews with deans and former deans in New Zealand, seek to discover whether my thesis has any validity and usefulness, both to deans and the wider church.

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  • eCommerce Website Evaluation framework: An Owner's Perspective

    Ghandour, Ahmad (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    In New Zealand, many businesses are investing in setting up their websites to sell goods and services as online trading becomes more popular. This action has caused disillusionment for some companies as it is difficult to clearly articulate the real benefits which could be derived from being online. This is may be due to the lack of an evaluation framework that enables owners to diagnose the performance of their eCommerce website. Current evaluative approaches presented in the literature are based on the users’ experience and fail to address the owner’s concerns. The research presented here is focussed on how to evaluate eCommerce websites based on the owner’s experience point of view. In order to be able to evaluate eCommerce websites, this study: (a) proposed a conceptual framework for eCommerce website evaluation, (b) developed measurement scales for the conceptual framework, (c) collected data based on owners’ perceptions (experience) with their websites, (d) tested the scale in businesses implementing eCommerce websites, and (e) investigated the relationship between the dimensions in the conceptual framework. The proposed research model is based on the current conceptualisation of Information Systems (IS) success models which suggest that success is a multidimensional construct. However, the customer experience is the dominant view taken in these success models. In the proposed model, and in order to address the concern of businesses setting up a website, evaluation is considered from the owner point of view. That is, a process model which links website offer to its payoffs through usage. Extra theoretical perspectives were necessary to account for the shift to the owner’s experience. Since the evaluation is based on the owner’s process understanding of creating a website, the owner satisfaction is included in the process as a contextual variance. This will enable factors in the evaluation model to be clearly linked in causal relationships that lead to owner satisfaction as an ultimate favourable result. Data was collected from 225 New Zealand businesses that have an eCommerce website through an online survey. The research model was tested using the two-step approach of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) where the structural model and measurement model were separately analysed. A set of measurement models was used to determine indicators that capture each construct and a structural model was used to determine the relationships between concepts. Each measurement model was tested in isolation, then factors forming the endogenous variables, followed by factors forming the exogenous variables were each separately tested, and finally a collective network was determined and tested. The key findings of this research showed that there are four factors that explain the change of performance in the website. These factors are: website offer, usage, financial returns, and owner satisfaction. The study concluded that websites could be evaluated along those four factors the effectiveness of which could be monitored along their measurement scales. It is also premised on the same variable that these factors function in a serial manner and the ultimate measure of effectiveness is owner satisfaction. The study also concluded that these factors explain the success of a website; each factor is necessary but not sufficient on its own to explain the success of a website.

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  • Marginally grounded: Camping ground residence in New Zealand

    Severinsen, Christina Anne (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    This study describes the nature of the experiences of camping ground residents in relation to their health, and within the context of individual, local and national spheres. It situates camping ground residence as a particular form of housing, and contests public understandings of camping grounds as only summer holiday destinations. Researchers from a range of disciplines continue to make advances in understanding the links between housing and health and extending our knowledge of the relationship. Housing as a health issue is multi- dimensional and complex; it affects individuals and how they interact with their communities and wider society. This thesis views housing in broad terms, taking into account the many influences that shape people’s experiences of their housing. While adequate housing has been identified as a key social determinant of health, and is a major policy goal in New Zealand, there has been little research focused on temporary accommodation. Camping grounds as a form of housing have not been previously discussed in the New Zealand literature. This thesis presents a narrative analysis of in-depth interviews carried out with 22 camping ground residents and 20 community key informants, in order to present a comprehensive insight into the dynamics of life in camping grounds. This thesis examines camping ground residence through a framework of the socio-spatial nature of housing, and through concepts of place, community and housing pathways. The research highlights the broader socio-political context in which New Zealand camping grounds operate, including the legal and regulatory frameworks, public representations, and definitions of homelessness and healthy housing. The politicisation and problematisation of camping ground residence illustrates the tensions surrounding the provision of housing in camping grounds, which is related to the marginalisation and social exclusion of those who live in camping grounds. This research explores camping ground residence as both positive and detrimental to the health of residents, through the shaping of residents’ opportunities and access to housing resources and community. The social exclusion and vulnerability of some residents, exacerbated by situations of poor quality housing and housing insecurity, is presented alongside other aspects of camping ground residence, such as opportunities to develop social networks and place attachment, which may mediate some of the effects of poor housing and social exclusion. The findings here offer an understanding of camping ground residence in New Zealand and conceptualise residents’ movements in, through and out of camping grounds. Narrative analysis enabled a comprehensive analysis of the experiences of those living in camping grounds, and facilitated reflection on the many layers of context and experience that shape residents’ housing and health. The thesis concludes by emphasising camping ground residence as contested and complex, and camping grounds as sites of the politics of place.

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  • Factors mediating successful oral vaccination with lipid-encapsulated Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    Czepluch, Wenzel (2010)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    During the course of this thesis factors mediating successful oral vaccination with lipidencapsulated Mycobacterium bovis BCG were examined. Mice were fed 2x10E07 CFU BCG encapsulated into a lipid matrix to prevent destruction by the gastrointestinal tract and to allow passage through the gut epithelia. In order to trace the vaccine following oral vaccination, mice were sacrificed at various time points ranging from 6 hours to 8 weeks post vaccination, and macerated lymphatic and non-lymphatic organs plated on solid agar. Initially, BCG was distributed widely in lymphatic and non-lymphatic organs, however, BCG was cleared quickly from most organs and formed small populations of less than 500 CFU/mouse in the mesenteric and cervical lymph nodes, as well as the Peyer’s patches 8 weeks post vaccination. Immuno-histochemistry and confocal microscopy, showed that BCG was absent from the follicles, but instead resided in the T cell containing intra-follicular areas. Very rarely BCG was associated with small CD11b+ cells that did not resemble typical macrophages and lacked peroxidase activity. Instead the majority of BCG could be found forming extracellular groups of 1-4 rods. This was confirmed using cell sorting of leukocytes isolated from alimentary tract lymphatics of orally vaccinated mice and only showed a minority of BCG to be associated with CD11c+ cells. Therefore, BCG is absent from typical antigen presenting cells, but instead might reside in CD11c+CD11b+ myeloid DC. Additionally, Ziehl-Neelsen staining revealed groups of intracellular coccoid forms of BCG. These were located toward the subcapsular space of draining lymph nodes where they were associated with sub-capsular macrophages. Interestingly, cocci proved to be non-platable using solid agar but instead required resuscitation in liquid media and therefore might resemble a form of dormancy. The presence of extracellular rods and intracellular cocci in on-professional antigen presenting cells might highlight the importance of secreted factors as an antigen source promoting successful activation of the immune system. Following oral vaccination, IFN-γ producing cells almost exclusively resided in the spleen. In order to characterize these cells, splenocytes of orally vaccinated mice were isolated 6 weeks post vaccination on the basis of surface marker expression using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Antigen-specific release of IFN-γ was monitored using ELISA and ELISpot assays and IFN-γ producing T cells were characterized as T effector memory cells expressing CD44, but not CD62L and lacked the expression of mucosal homing markers such as CD103 or α4β7. In addition, Lincoplex assays revealed the production of IL-17 by splenocytes. These did not express CD4+ but rather the γδ T cell eceptor. Together these results show that antigen reservoirs of BCG present in the draining lymphatics contain small numbers of typical filamentous BCG. A larger population of coccoid forms leaves open the possibility that coccoid forms are a major source of antigen for the stimulation of T cells. Although typical CD11c+ APC isolated from the lymphatic tissue of immunized mice did not appear capable of stimulating, T cells responses were nevertheless effectively induced by oral vaccination and shown to be IFN-γ producing TEM residing in the spleen but lacking expression of mucosal homing markers.

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  • Ika

    Vogel, Yolanda Jacqueline (2010)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis examines methodological issues in the analysis of fishbone assemblages from the Pacific. A review of the literature on Pacific fishing raises questions about methodology in Pacific fishbone analysis. Recent work in Pacific fishbone analysis at the Otago Archaeology Laboratory and other international laboratories has shown that different identification and quantification methods have significant influence on measures of relative abundance. This can affect the type of interpretations that result from midden analysis. A common method employed in New Zealand and the Pacific involves the identification of five paired mouth bones plus various special bones, and the use of MNI for quantification. A large fishbone assemblage from Rapa in French Polynesia is used as a case study to evaluate alternative analytical approaches. Tropical Pacific fish bone assemblages tend to have a relatively high species diversity compared to temperate New Zealand assemblages. Many reef fish also have small mouths in comparison to temperate fish species. It is concluded that in tropical Pacific assemblages the number of elements identified to taxa can have a significant effect on possible interpretations of past behaviours. This thesis also presents the first archaeological interpretation of the prehistoric fishing on Rapa. Due to its subtropical location Rapa presents an opportunity to study human adaptation to resource poor environments. While it is found that the fishing industry shows some general similarities to those of other islands in East Polynesia, the environmental constraints have resulted in some interesting variations in terms of target taxa. The analysis of the Rapan assemblages confirms that, at least in some cases, the use of a wider suite of elements for identification will have a significant impact on the number of taxa identified in an assemblage, and resulting interpretations of fishing behaviours.

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  • Shared parenting: mothers' experiences : "Experiences of mothering: how mothers view their roles in shared care arrangements for children following relationship separation"

    Riwhi, Jan (2010)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: [7], 77, [11] leaves : ill., forms ; 30 cm. Notes: "October 2010". University of Otago department: Sociology, Gender and Social Work. Thesis (M.S.W. (Endorsed))--University of Otago, 2011. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Rural New Zealand childhoods: social constructions and lived experiences

    Powell, Mary Ann (2010)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xiv, 358 leaves : col. ill ; 30 cm. Notes: University of Otago department: Centre for Research on Children and Families. March 2010. Thesis ( Ph. D. )--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Teenage reading: personal reading beyond school; habits, attitudes and beliefs

    Taylor, John Forsyth (2010)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: vi, 102, [13] leaves : forms ; 30 cm. Notes: "June 2010". University of Otago department: Education. Thesis (M.A.)--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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