27,089 results for Thesis

  • Carl Zeus

    Youngkong, Nattapon

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This project Carl Zeus (working title) investigates the German Expressionist film movement as an inspiration and a platform from which to develop a contemporary film project. The research focuses on the unique cinematographic and production techniques employed by the filmmakers of this movement. It explores the potential communicability of these cinematic devices. The movement (begun in 1919) emerged from the unique historical circumstances of post-World War One Germany. The works were primarily concerned with the country’s universally destabilized psyche and trauma that prevailed in German society after the war. The project questions the value of these cinematic devices in communicating contemporary issues and the experience of living in the present time. I next explore how to deploy an expressionist mode of cinema into a short film project. To negotiate this question, I produce a short film that deploys the Expressionist mode of cinema through the script, cinematography and mise-en-scene as a method of inquiry.

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  • Some aspects of the relationship between agriculture and the national economy : with special reference to labour

    Ross, B. J.

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    The interdependence of industry and agriculture in a modern economy is everywhere freely acknowledged, but New Zealand probably provides one of the most dramatic illustrations of the complementary nature of this relationship. In addition to the dependence of agriculture on manufacturing which is normal in advanced countries, many of New Zealand’s manufacturing industries are indirectly dependent on agriculture for their raw materials. Most raw materials have to be imported, and as agricultural products make up ninety per cent of the goods exported in exchange, a high level of agricultural production is essential if manufacturing output is to be maintained or increased. In view of this, a study of some aspects of the relationship between agriculture and industry in New Zealand is likely to prove of the greatest interest. It is intended in this present study to examine particularly those aspects concerned with labour enquiring into the size of the agricultural labour force in relation to the total labour force, and examining the relative incomes of agricultural and non-agricultural sections of the community. The work of Fisher, Clark, Ojala and others has shown that in those countries now considered economically advanced economic progress has been associated with a relative decline in the proportion of the labour force employed in agriculture, and a relative decline also in the importance of agriculture in the economy, measured in terms of the proportion of national income produced by agriculture. This work, and the discussion which arose from it, will be studied in a review of the literature in Chapter. I, while a quantitative study of New Zealand population and labour statistics will be carried out in Chapter III. The income generated by New Zealand agriculture will be compared with the national income in Chapter IV, in an attempt to discover whether economic progress in New Zealand has been associated with any change in the relative contribution of agriculture to the community’s total economic welfare. It has been shown by Bellerby and his co-workers that agricultural incomes have, in most of the countries studied, shown a long term tendency to be at a level far below non-agricultural incomes, although New Zealand is mentioned as an exception in the respect. This work will be considered in the review of literature, and in Chapter V the New Zealand data in this field will be examined. In Chapter VI an attempt will be made to draw the data together to see how the New Zealand results compare with those obtained by Clark, Bellerby and the others, and how they fit in with the general conclusions reached by these workers. Some suggestions for further work in this field in New Zealand will also be offered.

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  • Characterisation of rhizobia associated with New Zealand native legumes (Fabaceae) and a study of nitrogen assimilation in Sophora microphylla

    Tan, Heng Wee

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    Many legume species have the capacity to fix atmospheric N₂ via symbiotic bacteria (generally termed “rhizobia”) in root nodules and this can give them an advantage under low soil N conditions if other factors are favourable for growth. There are four genera of native legumes, on the main New Zealand (NZ) islands. These are the closely related Carmichaelia, Clianthus and Montigena in the Carmichaelinae clade, tribe Galegeae, and Sophora, within the tribe Sophoreae: all are capable of nodulation. Little work has been done on the genotypic characterisation and host-range specificity of the rhizobia associated with NZ native legumes. Moreover, the ability of native legumes to assimilate soil N in comparison with their N₂ fixation has not been assessed. The primary objectives of this research were to 1) more fully characterise the rhizobia associated with the four genera of NZ native legumes, including their ability to cross nodulate different species and 2) assess the ability of Sophora microphylla to assimilate soil N in comparison with its N₂ fixation. Gene sequencing results indicated that the bacterial strains isolated from NZ native legumes growing in natural ecosystems in the current and previous studies were of the genus Mesorhizobium. Generally, the Carmichaelinae and Sophora species were nodulated by two separate groups of Mesorhizobium strains. Ten strains isolated from the Carmichaelinae showed 16S rRNA and nifH similar to the M. huakuii type strain, but had variable recA and glnII genes, novel nodA and nodC genes and the seven strains tested could produce functional nodules over a range of Carmichaelinae species but did not nodulate Sophora species. Forty eight strains isolated from Sophora spp. showed 16S rRNA similar to the M. ciceri or M. amorphae type strains, variable recA, glnII and rpoB genes and novel and specific nifH, nodA and nodC genes which were different from those of the Carmichaelinae strains. Twenty one Sophora strains tested were able to produce functional nodules on a range of Sophora spp. but none nodulated C. australis. However, eighteen of the twenty one strains produced functional nodules on Cl. puniceus. These results indicate that, in general, the ability of different rhizobial strains to produce functional nodules on NZ native legumes is likely to be dependent on specific symbiosis genes. Clianthus puniceus appears to be more promiscuous in rhizobial host than the other NZ native legumes species tested. Generally, strains isolated from NZ native Sophora spp. from the same field site grouped together in relation to their “housekeeping” gene sequences and ERIC-PRC fingerprinting banding patterns. Most strains were able to grow at pH 3 – pH 11 but only one showed phosphorus solubilisation ability and none showed siderophore production. The strains showed differences in their ability to promote the growth of S. microphylla under glasshouse conditions. DNA-DNA hybridisation tests indicated that strains isolated from New Zealand native Sophora spp. are of several new Mesorhizobium species. The ability of S. microphylla to utilise soil NO₃⁻ and NH₄⁺ in comparison with its N₂ fixation was assessed under glasshouse conditions. N₂ fixing (nodulated) plants showed substantially greater growth and tissue N content than those relying solely on NH₄NO₃, NO₃⁻ or NH₄⁺ up to the equivalent of 200 kg N ha⁻¹ and N limitation is likely to have been the major cause of reduced growth of non-N₂ fixing (non-nodulated) plants. NO₃⁻ levels were negligible in plant tissues regardless of NO₃⁻ supply, indicating that virtually all NO₃⁻ taken up was assimilated. Thus, there appears to be a limitation on the amount of NO₃⁻ that S. microphylla can take up. However, it is possible that S. microphylla could not access NO₃⁻ in the potting mix and further work is required using different substrate and more regular NO₃⁻ applications to confirm this. Plants showed NH₄⁺ toxicity symptoms at 25 kg NH₄⁺-N ha⁻¹ and above. Nitrate reductase activity was not detected in roots or leaves of mature S. microphylla in the field: all plants were nodulated. Overall, the two major findings of this research are 1) NZ native legumes are nodulated by diverse and novel Mesorhizobium species and 2) S. microphylla seedlings have limited ability to utilise soil inorganic N. Important future work based on the results obtained in this research is discussed.

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  • Jurassic sediments at Chaslands mistake.

    Geary, Geoffrey Clive (1976)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 34 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geology

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  • The son enthroned in conflict : a socio-rhetorical interpretation of John 5.17-23

    Huie-Jolly, Mary R (1994)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xviii, 333 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Theology

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  • No woman's land : marginality, liminality and non-traditional women in New Zealand : decade between early 1970 - early 1980

    Hollebon, Janice Marion (1986)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 91 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Anthropology

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  • Petrology and geochemistry of alkaline and granitoid intrusions, Pipecleaner Glacier region, Southern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    Hall, Charlotte Elizabeth (1991)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    122 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliography. University of Otago department: Geology.

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  • Remineralisation of decalcified tooth enamel consequent to orthodontic treatment

    Lam, Emily (2010)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xx, 253 leaves : col. ill ; 30 cm. Notes: “A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Clinical Dentistry in Orthodontics, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand”. "August 2010". University of Otago department: Oral Sciences. Thesis ( D. Clin. Dent. )--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Actions of attention, and attention to action: investigating the relationship between visual attention, episodic representation, and language

    Webb, Andrew (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Cognitive representations of episodes are likely to play an important role in the neural mechanisms representing the syntactic and semantic structure of natural language sentences. However, there is little consensus on how observed episodes are represented in the brain, and how those episode representations can be transformed to and from corresponding sentence descriptions. This work investigates the theory that there is a direct structural relationship between the representation of episodes and sentences describing those episodes, and that the underlying mechanism which informs the representation of an episode is based upon the sequence of sensorimotor actions involved in observing that episode. This gives rise to two predictions: firstly that there is a canonical sequence of sensorimotor actions involved in observing actions, and secondly, that changing that sequence leads to systematic changes in descriptions of those actions. Experimental results confirm that there is a strong default sensorimotor sequence involved in the observation of a range of transitive actions. However, in part due to the robustness of the default sensorimotor sequence, the second prediction was not confirmed.

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  • Geophysical survey of the Paringa River valley, South Westland

    Kilner, Jeremy William (2005)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: [iv], 104 leaves : ill., maps ; 30 cm. + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.) and 1 map (folded). Notes: CD-ROM and map in pockets inside back cover. University of Otago department: Geology. Thesis (B. Sc. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 2005. Includes bibliographic references.

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  • Taxonomy and phylogeny of industrial solvent-producing clostridia

    Keis, Stefanie (1996)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xii, 314 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "June 1996". Includes previously published material by the author. University of Otago department: Microbiology.

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  • The social construction of femininities in a rural New Zealand community

    Gill, Erica Jane (2007)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 90 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 85-90). "June 2007"

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  • Charles Begg and Company Limited : the story of music in New Zealand is the history of Begg's

    Gleeson, Jean Clare (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 143 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "December 2009". University of Otago department: History

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  • Growth and movement of Blue Cod (Parapercis colias) in Paterson Inlet, Stewart Island, New Zealand

    Govier, Daniel (2001)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    ix, 142 leaves :ill., map ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 134-142. "December 2001." University of Otago department: Marine Science.

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  • Dr Edward Shortland and the politics of ethnography

    Lousberg, Marjan Marie (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xi, 321 leaves :col. port., map ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: History.

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  • Power Modelling in Multicore Computing

    Mair, Jason (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Power consumption has long been a concern for portable consumer electronics, but has recently become an increasing concern for larger, power-hungry systems such as servers and clusters. This concern has arisen from the associated financial cost and environmental impact, where the cost of powering and cooling a large-scale system deployment can be on the order of millions of dollars a year. Such a substantial power consumption additionally contributes significant levels of greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, software-based power management policies have been used to more effectively manage a system’s power consumption. However, managing power consumption requires fine-grained power values for evaluating the run-time tradeoff between power and performance. Despite hardware power meters providing a convenient and accurate source of power values, they are incapable of providing the fine-grained, per-application power measurements required in power management. To meet this challenge, this thesis proposes a novel power modelling method called W-Classifier. In this method, a parameterised micro-benchmark is designed to reproduce a selection of representative, synthetic workloads for quantifying the relationship between key performance events and the corresponding power values. Using the micro-benchmark enables W-Classifier to be application independent, which is a novel feature of the method. To improve accuracy, W-Classifier uses run-time workload classification and derives a collection of workload-specific linear functions for power estimation, which is another novel feature for power modelling. To further improve accuracy, W-Classifier addresses a number of common misconceptions in power modelling, which were found to impact both modelling accuracy and evaluation. These misconceptions have arisen from differences in the experimental setup and configuration, such as, execution time, handling of thermal effects and performance event selection. These differences can influence the perceived modelling accuracy, resulting in potentially misleading or erroneous conclusions if sufficient care is not taken. As a result, W-Classifier has adopted a number of additional steps to ensure good modelling practices, which were not available in previous work. In addition to improving modelling accuracy, the workload classification used in W-Classifier can be leveraged by power management policies to provide execution context to the power values. The workload context enables more informed power policies to be implemented, improving the balance between power and performance in achieving effective power management. According to experimental results, the modelling accuracy of W-Classifier is significantly better than previous multi-variable modelling techniques due to a collection of workload-specific power models derived through run-time workload classification. Therefore, W-Classifier can accurately estimate power consumption for a broader range of application workloads, where a separate power model can be used for each distinct workload.

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  • The Epidemiology of Pertussis and Timeliness of Pertussis Immunisation in New Zealand

    Deane, Georgia Bailey (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Introduction Despite increasing immunisation coverage in recent years, pertussis remains a leading cause of immunisation preventable disease in New Zealand. The current pertussis epidemic in New Zealand began in August 2011 and did not show signs of abating until May 2013. The current New Zealand immunisation schedule recommends that the first three doses of pertussis vaccine be received at six weeks, three months and five months of age. These are known as the primary series. A delay in receiving any dose of the primary series delays the time to developing effective immunity. It is not known how many children in New Zealand have delays between doses of pertussis vaccine, nor the extent of the delays. The aims of this study were as follows: 1. To provide an overview of the history of the epidemiology of pertussis as well as recent pertussis epidemiology in New Zealand. 2. To describe the coverage and timeliness of the primary series of pertussis immunisations for New Zealand and separately for children living in the greater Wellington region. 3. To detect differences in timeliness of immunisations by calendar year, socio-demographic characteristics, and by region for New Zealand and separately for children living in the greater Wellington region. An immunisation is considered not timely if it was not received within four weeks of the age specified by the New Zealand immunisation schedule. The definition of timeliness according to age works as long as the first vaccine dose is received at six weeks of age. However, if the first dose is received when the infant is older than six weeks, the timing of the second and third dose should be adjusted to maximise antibody production. Therefore, a second definition of timeliness was explored. Specifically, due dates for the second and third doses were calculated according to the recommended interval between doses. Between doses one and two the interval is scheduled to be six weeks. Between doses two and three the interval is scheduled to be two months. Methods The study population included all children born in New Zealand between 2007 and 2012 as recorded on the National Immunisation Register (NIR). Children excluded from the study were those: whose date of death was recorded as being before their date of birth, whose gender was recorded as ‘unknown’ or ‘indeterminate’, who were not included in the NIR (i.e opted off), who were not recorded as having received at least one pertussis vaccine dose, who had records of more than four pertussis vaccine doses, who had records of two pertussis vaccine doses within four weeks of each other, who were recorded as having died before receiving their first pertussis vaccine dose and who were recorded as receiving a pertussis vaccine dose before their date of birth. The study is a retrospective cohort study. The population was followed retrospectively over time to observe the occurrence of pertussis immunisation. Descriptive observations as well as multivariate regression analyses using ‘R’ were conducted. Results 371,587 children recorded in the National Immunisation Register were analysed for pertussis immunisation occurrence and timeliness. Timeliness of dose one was 89.0% for the whole New Zealand population. Timeliness of dose two was 87.8% and dose three was 83.1%. Overall 71.2% of the population received all three doses on time. Timeliness varied within each of the population subgroups of ethnicity, socio-economic deprivation, calendar year of vaccination and regions within New Zealand. Children of Asian ethnicity had the highest percentage of children receive all their immunisations on time (83.4%), followed by European ethnicity (76.3%). Māori had the lowest percentage with on time vaccination across all doses and had 52.5% of children receive all their immunisations on time. Timeliness was significantly different across all ethnicities (p<0.001). Discussion and conclusions This study found that only 71.2% of infants received all three pertussis doses on time leaving them vulnerable to infection themselves, and also acting as a source of infection for others. This immunisation deficiency may be contributing to pertussis remaining a poorly controlled disease in New Zealand with recurring epidemics resulting in large numbers of cases, hospitalisations and occasional deaths. On time immunisation varied across population groups and regions showing that there is work to be done to reduce these inequalities. There were significant differences between Māori and Pacific People and those living in areas of high socio-economic deprivation in particular. Policy concerning immunisation coverage and timeliness in New Zealand currently targets these populations and these results confirm that focus should remain on these groups if immunisation timeliness is to improve and rates of pertussis disease are to go down. This study shows that those who do not receive their first pertussis immunisation on time are more likely to have subsequent delays. This is an important finding which could guide interventions aimed at improving immunisation timeliness. Immunisation provides an ideal opportunity to connect with the parents or caregivers of the child, and educate them on the importance of immunisation timeliness to ensure that subsequent doses are received on time. Many primary care facilities in New Zealand have a system in place to contact parents and caregivers when their child is due for an immunisation, either by phone or mail. However, this contact can be easily forgotten when medical centres and other facilities become too busy or there are staff shortages. One solution may be to employ a dedicated nurse administrator, who is responsible for contacting parents to remind them that their child is due for an immunisation and to discuss with them the importance of timeliness. This is the first study in New Zealand to provide a comprehensive estimate of pertussis immunisation timeliness. Future research into whether the results from this study on immunisation timeliness correspond with rates of pertussis disease and hospitalisation would improve the understanding of the relationship between pertussis immunisation timeliness and disease occurrence.

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  • Troubling plagiarism: University students' understandings of plagiarism

    Adam, Lee Ann (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    In this thesis, I report on a doctoral study that examined undergraduate university students’ understandings of plagiarism. The thesis addresses a gap in the existing plagiarism research since much of the literature on students’ understandings of plagiarism to date has focused on institutional or staff reports. Although there is a growing body of research reporting on students’ perspectives of plagiarism, there is a paucity of in-depth qualitative studies in this area. The theoretical framework for this study was informed by social constructionist, poststructuralist, and academic literacies perspectives. These informed my research methodology, including my close attention to students’ articulated understandings of plagiarism in relation to broader institutional discourses. Methodologically, the study involved interviews with 21 students drawn from first year lectures at the University of Otago, Aotearoa New Zealand. The students represented a variety of age ranges and levels of university study. The interviews focused on the students’ understandings of plagiarism, as well as their views on learning, assessment, and what constitutes a university education. I used discourse analysis to ‘read’ the students’ responses alongside the plagiarism discourses that appeared in University policy. The thesis findings identify four main discourses that emerged in the students’ comments about plagiarism: ethico-legal discourses, where students used language reflecting a view of plagiarism as a moral or legal issue; fairness discourses, where students positioned plagiarism policy and practices as either fair or not fair; confusion discourses, where students expressed confusion about plagiarism policy and/or practices; and learning discourses, where students spoke about plagiarism as either inhibiting learning or indicating that students had not learned. These discourses were reflective of University policy that positioned plagiarism as a form of dishonesty irrespective of whether or not it was intentional. When asked to reflect on learning, assessment, and the purpose of a university education, most of the students drew heavily on employment discourses where they described universities as places in which to prepare for future employment. From an employment viewpoint, plagiarism policy and practices seemed irrelevant to most students. The findings of this research challenge the way in which plagiarism is framed at the University of Otago. Currently, plagiarism is conceptualised as a textual feature within the finished product of a student’s assignment, and both intentional and unintentional plagiarism are treated as academic dishonesty. I argue that in order to support students’ learning, unintentional plagiarism should be positioned within academic writing. Furthermore, students’ writing should be viewed as a process rather than as a product, and students should be scaffolded in their development as academic writers. I further argue that, because of the dominant ethico-legal discourses surrounding the term ‘plagiarism’, we instead use the term ‘matching text’. This would remove the implication of dishonesty, and allow for an educative response to incidences of unintentional plagiarism.

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  • Spectroscopy of Donor-Acceptor Compounds

    van der Salm , Holly (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    A number of donor-acceptor compounds have been investigated using a range of spectroscopic and computational techniques. Donor-acceptor compounds are widely used in molecular electronics applications, and it is of interest to investigate how their properties can be manipulated and probed. Ground state properties are characterised with Fourier Transform (FT) - Raman spectroscopy, which is also used to verify density functional theory calculations. The initially formed excited state (Franck-Condon state) is characterised with electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Transient absorption spectroscopy tends to probe the longest-lived excited state, while time-resolved infrared spectroscopy can probe intermediate states and kinetic processes as the time between pump and probe is varied. Experimental techniques are complemented by the use of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A series of complexes containing dimethyl or diphenyl amine- substituted dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz) in which the ancillary ligand at the metal centre was varied were studied. The properties of these ligands and complexes were found to be dominated by a strong intra-ligand charge transfer (ILCT) transition from the amine to dppz, with little contribution from typical low-energy metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transitions for complexes. Protonation shifted this ILCT transition to the near-IR; this was characterised with resonance Raman spectroscopy and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations. Based on this study, amine-substituted dppz systems were altered in various ways in order to manipulate this ILCT transition. The effect of changing the distance between the amine donor and the dppz acceptor was investigated; this was found to influence the energy of the ILCT transition, the relative intensity of vibrational modes associated with different parts of the molecule, and the excited state lifetime, but the ILCT character appeared to be retained. The effect of the angle between the donor and acceptor units for dppz was altered in various ways. Increasing the donor-acceptor angle was found to increase the energy and decrease the intensity of the ILCT transition, and increase the intensity of an MLCT transition for Re(I) complexes. Experimental and calculated non-resonant Raman cross sections also decreased as donor-acceptor angle was increased. The effect of changing the bridge type between donor and acceptor from conducting thiophene to more insulating triazole was investigated. This increased the energy of the lowest electronic transition, and reduced the degree of ILCT in this transition, with behaviour tending towards more typical dppz as the linker became more insulating. The properties of the ligand 5,6,11,12,17,18 - hexaazatrinaphthalene (HATN) substituted with electron-donating sulfur groups were investigated. The mono-, bi- and tri-Re(CO)3Cl complexes of this ligand showed broad and intense visible absorption, which TD-DFT calculations suggested involved mixed MLCT/ILCT transitions. Resonance Raman spectroscopy was consistent with this, and time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy provided evidence for a mixed MLCT/ILCT excited state. Finally, a series of donor-acceptor compounds that are used in dye-sensitised solar cells are discussed, in order to try and understand what makes some more efficient than others. The first series were zinc porphyrin -based with carbazole -thiophene chains, which increased their visible absorption. The second series were organic dyes, also using a carbazole donor and thiophene chain, but for these compounds the reason for differences in solar cell performance could not be established with the techniques used.

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  • The natural history of autoimmune disorders in mice and its modification by therapy

    Casey, Thomas Patrick (1964)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    3 volumes; illustrations; diagrams. Thesis (M.D.) - University of Otago.

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