26,369 results for Thesis

  • Scanning Electron Microscopy of the Early Life Stages of the New Zealand Yellowfoot Paua, Haliotis australis and Factors Affecting Settlement.

    Maxwell, Paul Douglas Ian (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The purpose of this research was to spawn and settle larvae of the Yellowfoot Paua (Yellowfoot abalone) Haliotis australis (Gmelin, 1791) to investigate the early life stages of H. australis and the factors influencing settlement of the larvae of this abalone species in a commercial aquaculture context. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to investigate the morphological aspects of the development of the life stages of Haliotis australis from gametes, veliger larvae, post larvae and juveniles to 60 days post settlement (70 days post fertilisation). The photo micrograph results presented in this thesis represent the first comprehensive SEM micrograph record of the early life stages of H. australis. Settlement experiments tested success of larval settlement on four different diatom biofilm settlement substrates; 8-Day [old] Ungrazed Biofilm, 8-Day Grazed Biofilm (pre-grazed by conspecific adults to produce mucus trails), 1 Day Biofilm and No Biofilm. Half of the experimental replicates were settled with H. australis larvae treated with gamma(γ)-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to test the effectiveness of GABA as a chemical treatment to enhance settlement of H. australis larvae. Post larval survival at 33 days post settlement was used to infer the settlement success occurring at the time of settlement (between Day-0 and Day-4 post settlement). Analysis of mean survival data at 33-days post settlement identified that established diatom biofilms pre-grazed with conspecific adults (8 Day Grazed Biofilms) produced higher settlement than one day old diatom biofilm (1 Day Biofilm) and No Biofilm (control) treatments. Established diatom biofilms (‘8 Day Ungrazed Biofilm’) produced higher settlement than ‘No Biofilm’ treatments. The differences observed were statistically significant. The analysis of mean survival at 33-days post settlement identified that there was no significant difference detected between GABA and no-GABA treatments. However the observed results indicated that 8-Day Ungrazed Biofilms and 8-Day Grazed Biofilms treated with GABA, and untreated (no-GABA) 8 Day Grazed Biofilm settlement surfaces produced the best inferred settlement of H. australis larvae when compared to untreated 8 Day Ungrazed Biofilm and both GABA and no-GABA 1 Day Biofilm and No Biofilm treatments. These results suggest that pre-grazing of prepared diatom film settlement substrates with conspecific adult or juvenile abalone may be employed by hatcheries to ensure the highest rates of settlement in H. australis larvae. When the pre-grazing of established diatom biofilms is not a practical option in a larger scale aquaculture context, then the treatment of competent H. australis larvae with a GABA solution prior to settlement may be used to enhance the success of settlements onto established diatom biofilms.

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  • Irrigation for the sake of irrigation: Exploring the Relationship between Neoliberalism, Irrigation Projects and Resource Management Planning in New Zealand

    Harrington, William Lawrence (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Neoliberal processes and policies have had significant implications for the management of freshwater across the globe. In particular, the ongoing privatization of freshwater in order to create and maintain markets can be seen as a distinctly neoliberal pattern. In New Zealand, the current government has begun the process of investing up to $400 million dollars in private irrigation companies in order to stimulate economic growth. This investment is designed to expedite the development of large scale irrigation projects, in turn providing for more intensive farming operations. One of the projects to receive government funding has been the Hurunui Water Project – a recently consented proposal to irrigate 60,000 hectares of land within North Canterbury. Using the Hurunui Water Project as a case study, this research questions whether neoliberal processes are bound up in the roll out of large scale irrigation projects, and asks whether these projects are generating socially sustainable outcomes within rural New Zealand communities. Using a critical social science methodology, this research combined both primary and secondary research questions in order to address the research problem outlined above. Secondary research consisted of a literature review and document analysis, including the extensive review of grey material. This was complimented by key informant interviews within the Hurunui District. These interviews ultimately provided a wide range of insights into the challenges and pressures that rural New Zealand communities are facing in relation to irrigation and agricultural intensification. From these interviews, it emerged that there were concerns from both proponents and opponents alike of the Hurunui Water Project that there may be few winners under the scheme. In particular, there was a concern that the local community – including farmers – were being expected to bear the cost of a number of social externalities associated with water privatization and land use change, whilst the benefits lie elsewhere. To this end, neoliberal processes appear to be intricately bound up in the current roll out of irrigation in New Zealand, in a number of complex ways. This in turn is generating social effects which provide an insight into the planning challenges around large infrastructure projects, as well as the planning challenges associated with building socially sustainable rural communities on the back of irrigation.

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  • Portfolio of Compositions: Systematic composition of cross-genre hybrid music

    Mayall, Jeremy Mark (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Waikato

    The research focus of this PhD thesis is the development of a new technique for composing original musical compositions in which elements from different musical genres are hybridised. The innovative aspect of achieving balanced hybridity is the development of a systematic approach to selecting and synthesising or hybridising key musical elements across a range of different genres. The major component of this submission is a portfolio of nine original works with attached CD/DVD recordings. 1. Tracking Forward for viola, backing track and video 2. The Long White Cloud for chamber band and electronics 3. ‘Colorless green ideas sleep furiously’ for orchestra 4. Push for Miles for electric bass and backing track 5. Norse Suite for viola and cello 6. The Foggy Field a studio construction 7. Into the Nocturnal Sunshine for flute, viola, cello, drums and electronics 8. One Night, New Breath for taonga puoro, viola, drums and electronics 9. Sketches of an Intergalactic Earworm for piano trio and boombox The accompanying documentation clarifies, and contextualises the creation and presentation of these works; and illuminates the aesthetic underpinnings and compositional techniques developed and utilised as a part of this hybrid-genre compositional approach. The structure of the supporting exegesis is in two parts: the methodology of practice-based research, and reflective investigation. Part One (Chapters 1 and 2) is an introductory overview; an observation of the existing literature and related work, relevant creative practice in the composer’s previous work; and the compositional methodology – including an explanation of the genre matrix. Part Two (Chapters 3 to 12) analyses the use of genre, the balance of hybridity, and relevant compositional techniques utilised in the development of each individual piece.

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  • Age, growth and feeding ecology of five co-occurring fishes in southern New Zealand

    Jiang, Weimin (2002)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 340 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Marine Science

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  • Pavlova and pineapple pie : mixed parentage and Samoan-Pakeha identities in New Zealand

    Keddell, Emily (2000)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 168 leaves :ill., forms ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Community and Family Studies

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  • 11 week Beta-Hydroxy beta-Methylbutyric acid (HMB) supplementation: Effects on body composition and exercise performance in trained athletes.

    McIntosh, Nicholas Dean (2015)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Background: Originally used in the farming industry to ‘bulk up’ cattle, interest in the leucine metabolite, beta-hydroxy beta-methylbutyrate (HMB), has been growing following a clinical trial which demonstrated significant improvements in strength and body composition in humans. Subsequent trials reaffirmed that previously untrained individuals benefitted from supplementation. However, trials involving athletes have demonstrated mixed results with short (0.05), nor was there a statistically significant difference with respect to skin fold measurements (p>0.05). Conclusion: The increase in body mass found in this study is consistent with other long term (>6 week) HMB supplementation studies. These gains in body mass may have influenced running performance as a larger mass is required to be moved. As no significant differences in body composition or strength were seen, the findings of this study suggest caution needs to be taken when supplementing with HMB as negative performance effects may occur. Therefore close attention to the type of activities required by the athlete needs to be considered prior to supplementation.

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  • The Role of Planning in Contemporary Urban India: Consequences and Lessons from the Hyderabad Metropolitan Rail: Telangana, India

    Whitworth, Joseph James (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Rapid urbanisation in India has led to its cities becoming increasingly fragmented and subject to massive congestion. Further, the agencies in control of urban development have been widely criticised in planning literature for their role in poor governance processes, corruption and public exclusion. Hyderabad, the largest city and capital of Andhra Pradesh (now Telangana), has suffered from these same issues and its residents endure increasingly poor mobility. In line with Central Government policy which advocates for metro rail as an urban transport solution, Hyderabad has entered into the world’s largest Public Private Partnership (PPP) to develop and begin implementing the Hyderabad Metro Rail (HMR). Given the scale and significance of the project, and the various stakeholders involved, the HMR provides an interesting insight into the current state of planning and urban development in India. This research addresses the implications of the planning process in Hyderabad, and how these are manifesting in the Metro Rail project. The thesis focusses on the role planning plays, and the degree to which it is used in the project. Specifically, the thesis analyses the impacts of the planning process on the wider public, and communities in the city. Further, the research addresses implications on the HMR as a result of broader failures in the planning and regulatory frameworks in the city. Based on intensive fieldwork amongst bureaucrats, planners, non-governmental organisations, academics, journalists, religious communities and business communities the thesis finds that poor planning frameworks have led to underutilisation of, and inadequacies in, the planning process. Further, it shows that the interaction between master planning and regulation falls significantly short of the necessary level for such a large project. In addition, coordination between urban local bodies is lacking, and the understanding of each agencies role in the project is minimal. This planning process has led to inadequacies in consultation with citizens, and exacerbation of impacts on low and middle class communities in the city.

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  • Water wharf : rediscovering the natural processes that support urban life

    Geary, Whitney (2012)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    There is an urgency to find intelligent solutions for supplanting and diversifying water treatment to stop polluted water reaching our oceans. In New Zealand, soil run-off is the largest threat to our marine ecosystem and urban landscapes contribute litter, sediment, harmful chemicals, heavy metals and nutrients to the mix. Auckland City has very little infrastructure in place to treat its urban run-off, thus it was suggested as a pilot location for this project. This project envisions an environmentally friendly and aesthetically compelling urban run-off treatment facility that will enhance the development of urban communities. A proportion of the city’s stormwater pipes are intercepted and redirected to a treatment facility in the Viaduct Harbour; a location chosen for its conspicuity, its predisposition for receiving gravitational water flow, and for its established pedestrian accessibility. The process of water purification acts as a connective tissue through an environment that provokes a renewed relationship to water. As the water reaches its final stages of treatment, it becomes an interactive element in the form of fresh water streams, remediation wetlands, recreational estuarine pools and habitats for marine life. The water treatment facility supplies clean water to a freshwater habitat, with the aim of recovering whitebait populations; as well as returning purified water to the harbour. The mechanistic infrastructure of waterworks is transformed into an interactive and sensory series of purification strategies. Combined with platforms, piers, water tanks, restaurants, recreational pools and channels; water-based landscapes become organisational moments for community awareness. The proposed site is the area of Auckland City’s Viaduct Harbour intended for the extension of Halsey Wharf. It lies between the original Freemans Bay and Commercial Bay.

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  • Spiritual vegetarianism: identity in everyday life of Thai non-traditional religious cult members

    Makboon, Boonyalakha

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    This thesis examines how the participants who are Thai and vegetarians integrate vegetarianism into their lives, and how they produce and maintain their vegetarian identity element. This video-ethnographic study was conducted in Thailand over the course of five months, with particular attention to three participants who are members of non-traditional religious cults in Thailand, where vegetarianism is a normal practice. Utilizing multimodal (inter)action analysis (Norris, 2004, 2011a), I conducted a micro analysis by teasing apart the participants’ real-time interactions, investigating how different modes come to play together to make certain actions possible. The analysis also incorporates other data from observational notes, sociolinguistic interviews and photographs. I discovered that the participants produced a spiritual vegetarian identity element in accordance with their religious belief. The participants produced multiple identity elements, including but not limited to their spiritual vegetarian identity element, at differentiated levels of the participants’ attention/awareness. At the time of the study, my participants did not continuously produce their spiritual vegetarian identity element, and thus a spiritual vegetarian identity was not their most salient identity element. However, I found that vegetarianism plays a significant role in the participants’ lives as they always produced their spiritual vegetarian identity element in connection with other identity elements. This results from the fact that these identity elements were developed within a religious context which was embedded in the historical body (Nishida, 1985) of the participants. Religion has exerted a substantial influence on many aspects of their lives and their resulting identity elements.

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  • The survival of things

    Coveny, Eloise Jayne

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    How might a sonic archiving installation practice produce conditions of history other to orthodox narratives of time? What might a Benjaminian “destructive character” today make of analogue and digital archives for producing uncanny encounters within chips of messianic time? The above dialectical image maps out my research site. At my crossroads stands History proper and historical ambiguity—spoken as ‘I’, my site inscribes difference in archiving things from Victoriana inspired moments, filtered through a girl from Auckland, New Zealand circa 1980s and 1990s (culminating most poignantly in 1994). My installation practice evokes particularly voices materialised through sonic forces aided through photographic, filmic, and recording apparatuses and their representational modalities. These sonic forces material my artistic research practice as a historic figure existing within me as an artist-researcher figuring out (my) different narratives. I employ myself here as a type of destructive (Benjaminian) figure, making radical sonic interventions as historic otherness appear to me to bring to ‘light’ Walter Benjamin’s conceptual historic materialism of time as: the true picture of the past; time at a standstill; moment of danger; ambiguity; dialectical image that is pregnant with tensions; uncanny limits to ourselves. I unpack these radical expressions of time and history—that are marked out above in my dialectical image; my site of research—through the following exegesis. I figure my practice (my self) dangerously between the dominance of orthodox archiving narratives to specify an acute ‘familiar’ moment—say 1994 (1994: Time-space encounters between digital forces and analogue ghosts). I read my project as the dialectical image above and hope that one can better understand this site increasingly throughout the reading of this exegesis. This understanding of time at a [dialectical] standstill is taken from the philosopher Walter Benjamin. This time of arrest is counter to linear time that is often posed as the dominant voice throughout historicism [discourses] (i.e. writing history) that marginalises other voices and other experiences. My practice works within this site of investigation to privilege lost voices that explore a longing for historic authenticity—where the location of authenticity lies in its alterity, in what is distant to the present time and space. Benjamin practices [destructive] lyrical configuration through the modern allegory, which I here explore through my practice in the form of anachronistic spatial configuration (installation) as a method for [sonic] archiving. The anachronistic structuring of my installation tests activate dialectical tensions that speak to us of the hidden voices repressed by the orthodox structure of things; through juxtaposing and rupturing orthodox histories via my relations to things in the world. This has become in part an autobiographical tenor that lyrically composes my exegesis and installation as a methodology. It does this bearing in mind the viewer’s independence, where my own autos is largely heterogeneously fractured into the archival installation final exhibition aiming for uncanny registers that can only be designed by the ‘hand’ of weak messianic power (Benjamin). My sonic forces mapping out the research aims of this installation archiving practice are inspired primarily by the work of Walter Benjamin's concept of Messianic time in relation to historical materialism. My artistic research has focused in on relations of voices through time; voices that have spoken to me throughout (auto)biographical encounters with artefacts; things that continue to return and inhabit me more so than I realise. These things are speaking to me now, here; at a crux moment of a self-splitting between some fantasy autos of my biography, and yet they are shot through with the voices of those philosophers I am engaging and their autos. In this sense, my artistic material and precedence gather around the literary, poetic, and mystical voices of others (people, antiques, commodities, spaces, places, photographs, films and other textual forms of archival material). The images that make up my work emerge from the imagination, now brought to the fore through these textual methodological encounters that inspire my way through. In this sense, my practice appears on the surface to be voiding the proper of art historical practitioner precedence, and yet in this way I have followed an authentic (unorthodox) path that is akin to the destructive character Benjamin evokes. The images of others sit below this surface only to rise uncannily in the strange present that this time evokes. The concept of the uncanny, guided by voices of Martin Heidegger, Sigmund Freud and Walter Benjamin, open up my mystical moments for installing such an encounter of strange time as a survival of things.

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  • Performance analysis of fielding and wicket-keeping in cricket to inform strength and conditioning practice

    MacDonald, Danielle Catherine

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The purpose of this thesis was to contribute to the scientific understanding of the performance demands of One Day International (ODI) fielding and wicket-keeping, and to provide recommendations for improving athlete performance, assessment and coach education. Two comprehensive literature reviews of the physical, technical, physiological and tactical components of fielding and wicket-keeping were conducted. Given the gaps identified in the literature reviews, an online mixed method survey of cricket players, coaches and trainers was designed to investigate the performance requirements of the wicket-keeper, close, inner and outer circle fielders. Players and coaches rated agility the most important physical attribute for the wicket-keeper (4.7/5), close fielders (4.6/5), and inner circle fielders (4.8/5). Speed (4.8/5) and agility (4.6/5) were rated most important for outer circle fielders. Coaches raised the issue of the lack of a cricket specific agility test. An emerging theme for all categories was the importance of the mental aspects of the game such as positive attitude and concentration, particularly for the wicket-keeper. To validate the use of video footage for performance analysis a comparison was made between televised and purposefully collected video for event coding. The variables of interest were derived from the literature reviews and corroborated by the survey. The ICC for intra-coder reliability for all but two variables was between 0.88 and 1.00 the exceptions were lateral footwork (step 0.83 and shuffle 0.55) likely due to the subjectivity of defining footwork patterns. The televised footage under-reported the frequency of wicket-keeping activity (≈4.5%), except for lateral footwork, which was under-reported by the purposefully collected video (≈13.5%) due to the movement being perpendicular to the camera view. Even though fielding activity was under-reported (≈4.25) by televised footage, this footage was deemed to be most appropriate, as the collected footage resulted in a field of view that made the finer details of fielding difficult to distinguish. Performance analysis studies on fielding and wicket-keeping were carried out using televised footage from the 2011 ODI World Cup. The majority of the wicket-keepers movements were lateral (75%); primarily repetitive low intensity movements interspersed with explosive movements such as diving and jumping. Wicket-keeping glove-work skills (69%) were the most performed skill activity, the quality of which was quantified using a catching efficiency measure (93%). Close, inner and outer circle fielders had variable involvement in fielding activities. Close fielders were involved in 20% of the fielding activity, the bowler the most (58%) involved. The inner circle fielders were involved in 50% of fielding contacts; of whom cover was the position most involved (21%) Inner circle fielders had to display the greatest range of skills within the field, such as catching from different heights, varied throwing and ground fielding techniques. Outer circle fielders were involved with 30% of the fielding contacts; the outer circle position most involved was long on (14%). Long sprints were the hallmark of outer circle fielding, following the sprint, they often had to perform explosive movements such as a dive or a jump to field the ball; they rarely had the opportunity to stop and position themselves to perform their skill. Additionally, catching (75%,89%, 85%) throwing (0%,12%, 33%) and overall fielding performance (89%,98%,99% ) were quantified using efficiency calculations for close, inner and outer circle fielders respectively. The findings of the literature reviews and studies expanded upon the only previous study to quantify fielding performance, and informed the development of performance profiles of fielding and wicket-keeping. Subsequently recommendations for assessment, training and coaching have been made, which will be integrated into New Zealand Cricket resources. Most notable are suggestions for improving the existing skill and physical testing batteries

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  • Mach's principle in general relativity, and other gravitational theories

    Johnson, David Louthwood (1968)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 292 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 281-289. Typescript. University of Otago department: Mathematics.

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  • Grave doubts : an anatomy of funeral rituals in a New Zealand context

    Lawrence, Victoria (1995)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 81 leaves :col. ill., map ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 73-81) University of Otago department: Anthropology. "April 1995."

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  • The cultural transmission of cookery knowledge : from seventeenth century Britain to twentieth century New Zealand

    Inglis, Raelene (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xv, 354 leaves :ill., map ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Anthropology.

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  • Feeding the lambs : the influence of Sunday Schools in the socialization of children in Otago and Southland, 1848-1901

    Keen, David Stuart (1999)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xiv, 250 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • 'The danger of vertigo' : an evaluation and critique of Theōsis in the theology of Thomas Forsyth Torrance

    Habets, Michael (2006)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 387 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Theology and Religious Studies

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  • Visitor perspectives of ecotourism in the Maldives

    Ismail, Ikleela (2008)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: x, 159 leaves : ill. (some col.), forms, maps ; 30 cm. Notes: "March 2008". University of Otago department: Tourism. Thesis (M. Tour.)--University of Otago, 2009. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • ICTs and Rural Development in South India: Problematising Empowerment, Social Capital and Volunteering

    Chatbar, Rakhee (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis examines the deployment of Information and Communication Technologies for Development (ICT4D) in rural India. It seeks to contribute to scholarly discussions in the field of ICT4D by examining one particular project, the M. S. Swaminathan Research Foundation’s Village Knowledge Centres (VKCs) and the Village Resource Centres (VRCs) initiative in rural South India. Drawing from substantive field research conducted in the state of Tamil Nadu and the Union Territory of Pondicherry, this thesis examines the three key developmental outcomes of the VKCs initiative — empowerment, social capital, and volunteering. The thesis argues that the VKCs initiative has not successfully met the key development objectives as the opportunities offered are not transformative and do not alter existing structural conditions. This is because the micro-contextual variations within and across rural communities are not adequately integrated into the design and implementation of the project. The thesis also argues that the VKCs initiative in rural India is significantly impacted by larger global and national structures. A more robust engagement by the NGO that considers the inter-connectedness of institutional, social and cultural structures and micro-contexts is central to harness the potential of ICTs to deliver development objectives. In undertaking this study, the thesis makes the following research contributions. First, the thesis responds to scholarly demand for empirically based engagements as a key means to ascertain the potential of ICTs for development. Secondly, the thesis broadens the theoretical and empirical understanding of empowerment, social capital and volunteering in ICT4D. Finally, the thesis proposes a number of practical recommendations for policy makers. The thesis aims to contribute to research in ICT4D, studies on rural development in India, and to future strategies for incorporating ICTs more effectively in development planning and practice.

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  • Demographic, socioeconomic and nutritional status of preschool children attending early childhood development centres in Emali, Kenya

    Beaumont, Sarah Natalie (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    In rural African towns such as Emali and the surrounding counties, deterioration in food security is evident due to severe rainfall deficits over the last several years in this semi-arid climate. The 2008-09 Kenyan Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) indicated that 38% of preschoolers in the Emali region are chronically malnourished defined by height-for-age Z scores <22%). Each school supplied the children with two meals, UNIMIX, a fortified cornsoy blend porridge and Githeri, a traditional meal based on unrefined maize and kidney beans. For the majority of children (3-5 year olds), the energy supplied by the school meals met approximately 40-47% of their age- and sex-specific estimated energy requirements. The median supply of iron, zinc, vitamin A, vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin B12 for the combined meals either met or was above the RNI for children 4-6 years of age, indicating the supply was likely to be adequate. The supply of niacin and thiamin were at a level between the EAR and RNI, while the remaining nutrients (i.e., vitamin C, calcium, riboflavin, and vitamin D) were all below the EAR for a child aged 4-6 years. There was marked variations in the energy and nutrient supply from the meals across school, attributed to the varying thickness of the porridge (i.e., amount of water used) as well as the portion sizes served to the children. In conclusion, anemias together with chronic infection were highly prevalent among the preschool children and stunting and wasting was of medium risk. The current diets of the children were predominantly plant-based and lacked the energy and many of the nutrients required for optimal growth and development. This study also highlighted the need for standardised school meal recipes. In addition, dietary diversification and modification strategies including the addition of animal protein, fruit and vegetables to the school meals will serve to increase the energy and nutrient supply to the children and improve their current nutritional status.

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  • Tricksters, technology and spirit: practising place in Aotearoa-New Zealand

    Buxton, Maggie

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Place is a tricky concept. On the surface it seems a relatively simple notion, yet underneath there are layers of contested meanings. At the same time, places face ‘wicked’ problems – issues difficult to solve by traditional methods and approaches. For these reasons there is a call from across disciplines, for flexibility and creativity in place research. This thesis weaves together technology, art, spirituality and science to create a place practice inspired by tricksters. Tricksters appear in the narratives of most cultures as liminal, paradoxical and indeterminate figures. In this research they have new relevance at a time when the boundaries of life, including the lines between sacred and profane, are no longer clearly defined. They are an inspiration for a new form of place practice which creatively weaves together ubiquitous technologies, indigenous and speculative ontologies, and integral research methodologies. The proposition is that geo-locative mobile technologies can support the work of those who work with spiritual sites, and also support the spirit or spirits of those places, when used within a trickster-inspired place practice. What are the opportunities and issues that arise from this approach? Geo-locative mobile technologies augment physical spaces with digital content and can act as mediators between the self, the physical world, digital worlds and other worlds beyond. Technology is not usually associated with spirit. However, in this research technology paradoxically plays a role in supporting the spirit of place and contributes to a progressive understanding of that term. The place practice that informed this study was situated around three spiritually significant sites: a cemetery, a marae and a public park. Within each case study, a bricolage of inter-, intra-, and transpersonal data collection methods was enacted. Integral philosophies and trickster traits combined to create the unique methodology. This research joins traditionally separate discourses: spirit of place, tricksters, and geo-locative mobile technology. It addresses the need for more creative ways of working in and with place, and raises legal, moral, cultural, and political issues in the use of mobile technologies in indigenous and/or sensitive contexts. Findings demonstrate that mobile technologies can shift perceptions of self and place, make institutional knowledge more accessible, and build connections in the third space where cultures, histories, peoples and realities meet. In these ways the practice supports the spirit of place.

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