26,380 results for Thesis

  • Petrology and geochemistry of alkaline and granitoid intrusions, Pipecleaner Glacier region, Southern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    Hall, Charlotte Elizabeth (1991)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    122 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliography. University of Otago department: Geology.

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  • Remineralisation of decalcified tooth enamel consequent to orthodontic treatment

    Lam, Emily (2010)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xx, 253 leaves : col. ill ; 30 cm. Notes: “A thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Clinical Dentistry in Orthodontics, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand”. "August 2010". University of Otago department: Oral Sciences. Thesis ( D. Clin. Dent. )--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Actions of attention, and attention to action: investigating the relationship between visual attention, episodic representation, and language

    Webb, Andrew (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Cognitive representations of episodes are likely to play an important role in the neural mechanisms representing the syntactic and semantic structure of natural language sentences. However, there is little consensus on how observed episodes are represented in the brain, and how those episode representations can be transformed to and from corresponding sentence descriptions. This work investigates the theory that there is a direct structural relationship between the representation of episodes and sentences describing those episodes, and that the underlying mechanism which informs the representation of an episode is based upon the sequence of sensorimotor actions involved in observing that episode. This gives rise to two predictions: firstly that there is a canonical sequence of sensorimotor actions involved in observing actions, and secondly, that changing that sequence leads to systematic changes in descriptions of those actions. Experimental results confirm that there is a strong default sensorimotor sequence involved in the observation of a range of transitive actions. However, in part due to the robustness of the default sensorimotor sequence, the second prediction was not confirmed.

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  • Geophysical survey of the Paringa River valley, South Westland

    Kilner, Jeremy William (2005)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: [iv], 104 leaves : ill., maps ; 30 cm. + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.) and 1 map (folded). Notes: CD-ROM and map in pockets inside back cover. University of Otago department: Geology. Thesis (B. Sc. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 2005. Includes bibliographic references.

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  • Taxonomy and phylogeny of industrial solvent-producing clostridia

    Keis, Stefanie (1996)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xii, 314 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "June 1996". Includes previously published material by the author. University of Otago department: Microbiology.

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  • The social construction of femininities in a rural New Zealand community

    Gill, Erica Jane (2007)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 90 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 85-90). "June 2007"

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  • Charles Begg and Company Limited : the story of music in New Zealand is the history of Begg's

    Gleeson, Jean Clare (2009)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 143 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "December 2009". University of Otago department: History

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  • Growth and movement of Blue Cod (Parapercis colias) in Paterson Inlet, Stewart Island, New Zealand

    Govier, Daniel (2001)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    ix, 142 leaves :ill., map ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 134-142. "December 2001." University of Otago department: Marine Science.

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  • Dr Edward Shortland and the politics of ethnography

    Lousberg, Marjan Marie (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xi, 321 leaves :col. port., map ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: History.

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  • Power Modelling in Multicore Computing

    Mair, Jason (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Power consumption has long been a concern for portable consumer electronics, but has recently become an increasing concern for larger, power-hungry systems such as servers and clusters. This concern has arisen from the associated financial cost and environmental impact, where the cost of powering and cooling a large-scale system deployment can be on the order of millions of dollars a year. Such a substantial power consumption additionally contributes significant levels of greenhouse gas emissions. Therefore, software-based power management policies have been used to more effectively manage a system’s power consumption. However, managing power consumption requires fine-grained power values for evaluating the run-time tradeoff between power and performance. Despite hardware power meters providing a convenient and accurate source of power values, they are incapable of providing the fine-grained, per-application power measurements required in power management. To meet this challenge, this thesis proposes a novel power modelling method called W-Classifier. In this method, a parameterised micro-benchmark is designed to reproduce a selection of representative, synthetic workloads for quantifying the relationship between key performance events and the corresponding power values. Using the micro-benchmark enables W-Classifier to be application independent, which is a novel feature of the method. To improve accuracy, W-Classifier uses run-time workload classification and derives a collection of workload-specific linear functions for power estimation, which is another novel feature for power modelling. To further improve accuracy, W-Classifier addresses a number of common misconceptions in power modelling, which were found to impact both modelling accuracy and evaluation. These misconceptions have arisen from differences in the experimental setup and configuration, such as, execution time, handling of thermal effects and performance event selection. These differences can influence the perceived modelling accuracy, resulting in potentially misleading or erroneous conclusions if sufficient care is not taken. As a result, W-Classifier has adopted a number of additional steps to ensure good modelling practices, which were not available in previous work. In addition to improving modelling accuracy, the workload classification used in W-Classifier can be leveraged by power management policies to provide execution context to the power values. The workload context enables more informed power policies to be implemented, improving the balance between power and performance in achieving effective power management. According to experimental results, the modelling accuracy of W-Classifier is significantly better than previous multi-variable modelling techniques due to a collection of workload-specific power models derived through run-time workload classification. Therefore, W-Classifier can accurately estimate power consumption for a broader range of application workloads, where a separate power model can be used for each distinct workload.

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  • The Epidemiology of Pertussis and Timeliness of Pertussis Immunisation in New Zealand

    Deane, Georgia Bailey (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Introduction Despite increasing immunisation coverage in recent years, pertussis remains a leading cause of immunisation preventable disease in New Zealand. The current pertussis epidemic in New Zealand began in August 2011 and did not show signs of abating until May 2013. The current New Zealand immunisation schedule recommends that the first three doses of pertussis vaccine be received at six weeks, three months and five months of age. These are known as the primary series. A delay in receiving any dose of the primary series delays the time to developing effective immunity. It is not known how many children in New Zealand have delays between doses of pertussis vaccine, nor the extent of the delays. The aims of this study were as follows: 1. To provide an overview of the history of the epidemiology of pertussis as well as recent pertussis epidemiology in New Zealand. 2. To describe the coverage and timeliness of the primary series of pertussis immunisations for New Zealand and separately for children living in the greater Wellington region. 3. To detect differences in timeliness of immunisations by calendar year, socio-demographic characteristics, and by region for New Zealand and separately for children living in the greater Wellington region. An immunisation is considered not timely if it was not received within four weeks of the age specified by the New Zealand immunisation schedule. The definition of timeliness according to age works as long as the first vaccine dose is received at six weeks of age. However, if the first dose is received when the infant is older than six weeks, the timing of the second and third dose should be adjusted to maximise antibody production. Therefore, a second definition of timeliness was explored. Specifically, due dates for the second and third doses were calculated according to the recommended interval between doses. Between doses one and two the interval is scheduled to be six weeks. Between doses two and three the interval is scheduled to be two months. Methods The study population included all children born in New Zealand between 2007 and 2012 as recorded on the National Immunisation Register (NIR). Children excluded from the study were those: whose date of death was recorded as being before their date of birth, whose gender was recorded as ‘unknown’ or ‘indeterminate’, who were not included in the NIR (i.e opted off), who were not recorded as having received at least one pertussis vaccine dose, who had records of more than four pertussis vaccine doses, who had records of two pertussis vaccine doses within four weeks of each other, who were recorded as having died before receiving their first pertussis vaccine dose and who were recorded as receiving a pertussis vaccine dose before their date of birth. The study is a retrospective cohort study. The population was followed retrospectively over time to observe the occurrence of pertussis immunisation. Descriptive observations as well as multivariate regression analyses using ‘R’ were conducted. Results 371,587 children recorded in the National Immunisation Register were analysed for pertussis immunisation occurrence and timeliness. Timeliness of dose one was 89.0% for the whole New Zealand population. Timeliness of dose two was 87.8% and dose three was 83.1%. Overall 71.2% of the population received all three doses on time. Timeliness varied within each of the population subgroups of ethnicity, socio-economic deprivation, calendar year of vaccination and regions within New Zealand. Children of Asian ethnicity had the highest percentage of children receive all their immunisations on time (83.4%), followed by European ethnicity (76.3%). Māori had the lowest percentage with on time vaccination across all doses and had 52.5% of children receive all their immunisations on time. Timeliness was significantly different across all ethnicities (p<0.001). Discussion and conclusions This study found that only 71.2% of infants received all three pertussis doses on time leaving them vulnerable to infection themselves, and also acting as a source of infection for others. This immunisation deficiency may be contributing to pertussis remaining a poorly controlled disease in New Zealand with recurring epidemics resulting in large numbers of cases, hospitalisations and occasional deaths. On time immunisation varied across population groups and regions showing that there is work to be done to reduce these inequalities. There were significant differences between Māori and Pacific People and those living in areas of high socio-economic deprivation in particular. Policy concerning immunisation coverage and timeliness in New Zealand currently targets these populations and these results confirm that focus should remain on these groups if immunisation timeliness is to improve and rates of pertussis disease are to go down. This study shows that those who do not receive their first pertussis immunisation on time are more likely to have subsequent delays. This is an important finding which could guide interventions aimed at improving immunisation timeliness. Immunisation provides an ideal opportunity to connect with the parents or caregivers of the child, and educate them on the importance of immunisation timeliness to ensure that subsequent doses are received on time. Many primary care facilities in New Zealand have a system in place to contact parents and caregivers when their child is due for an immunisation, either by phone or mail. However, this contact can be easily forgotten when medical centres and other facilities become too busy or there are staff shortages. One solution may be to employ a dedicated nurse administrator, who is responsible for contacting parents to remind them that their child is due for an immunisation and to discuss with them the importance of timeliness. This is the first study in New Zealand to provide a comprehensive estimate of pertussis immunisation timeliness. Future research into whether the results from this study on immunisation timeliness correspond with rates of pertussis disease and hospitalisation would improve the understanding of the relationship between pertussis immunisation timeliness and disease occurrence.

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  • Troubling plagiarism: University students' understandings of plagiarism

    Adam, Lee Ann (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    In this thesis, I report on a doctoral study that examined undergraduate university students’ understandings of plagiarism. The thesis addresses a gap in the existing plagiarism research since much of the literature on students’ understandings of plagiarism to date has focused on institutional or staff reports. Although there is a growing body of research reporting on students’ perspectives of plagiarism, there is a paucity of in-depth qualitative studies in this area. The theoretical framework for this study was informed by social constructionist, poststructuralist, and academic literacies perspectives. These informed my research methodology, including my close attention to students’ articulated understandings of plagiarism in relation to broader institutional discourses. Methodologically, the study involved interviews with 21 students drawn from first year lectures at the University of Otago, Aotearoa New Zealand. The students represented a variety of age ranges and levels of university study. The interviews focused on the students’ understandings of plagiarism, as well as their views on learning, assessment, and what constitutes a university education. I used discourse analysis to ‘read’ the students’ responses alongside the plagiarism discourses that appeared in University policy. The thesis findings identify four main discourses that emerged in the students’ comments about plagiarism: ethico-legal discourses, where students used language reflecting a view of plagiarism as a moral or legal issue; fairness discourses, where students positioned plagiarism policy and practices as either fair or not fair; confusion discourses, where students expressed confusion about plagiarism policy and/or practices; and learning discourses, where students spoke about plagiarism as either inhibiting learning or indicating that students had not learned. These discourses were reflective of University policy that positioned plagiarism as a form of dishonesty irrespective of whether or not it was intentional. When asked to reflect on learning, assessment, and the purpose of a university education, most of the students drew heavily on employment discourses where they described universities as places in which to prepare for future employment. From an employment viewpoint, plagiarism policy and practices seemed irrelevant to most students. The findings of this research challenge the way in which plagiarism is framed at the University of Otago. Currently, plagiarism is conceptualised as a textual feature within the finished product of a student’s assignment, and both intentional and unintentional plagiarism are treated as academic dishonesty. I argue that in order to support students’ learning, unintentional plagiarism should be positioned within academic writing. Furthermore, students’ writing should be viewed as a process rather than as a product, and students should be scaffolded in their development as academic writers. I further argue that, because of the dominant ethico-legal discourses surrounding the term ‘plagiarism’, we instead use the term ‘matching text’. This would remove the implication of dishonesty, and allow for an educative response to incidences of unintentional plagiarism.

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  • Spectroscopy of Donor-Acceptor Compounds

    van der Salm , Holly (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    A number of donor-acceptor compounds have been investigated using a range of spectroscopic and computational techniques. Donor-acceptor compounds are widely used in molecular electronics applications, and it is of interest to investigate how their properties can be manipulated and probed. Ground state properties are characterised with Fourier Transform (FT) - Raman spectroscopy, which is also used to verify density functional theory calculations. The initially formed excited state (Franck-Condon state) is characterised with electronic absorption and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Transient absorption spectroscopy tends to probe the longest-lived excited state, while time-resolved infrared spectroscopy can probe intermediate states and kinetic processes as the time between pump and probe is varied. Experimental techniques are complemented by the use of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. A series of complexes containing dimethyl or diphenyl amine- substituted dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz) in which the ancillary ligand at the metal centre was varied were studied. The properties of these ligands and complexes were found to be dominated by a strong intra-ligand charge transfer (ILCT) transition from the amine to dppz, with little contribution from typical low-energy metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) transitions for complexes. Protonation shifted this ILCT transition to the near-IR; this was characterised with resonance Raman spectroscopy and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations. Based on this study, amine-substituted dppz systems were altered in various ways in order to manipulate this ILCT transition. The effect of changing the distance between the amine donor and the dppz acceptor was investigated; this was found to influence the energy of the ILCT transition, the relative intensity of vibrational modes associated with different parts of the molecule, and the excited state lifetime, but the ILCT character appeared to be retained. The effect of the angle between the donor and acceptor units for dppz was altered in various ways. Increasing the donor-acceptor angle was found to increase the energy and decrease the intensity of the ILCT transition, and increase the intensity of an MLCT transition for Re(I) complexes. Experimental and calculated non-resonant Raman cross sections also decreased as donor-acceptor angle was increased. The effect of changing the bridge type between donor and acceptor from conducting thiophene to more insulating triazole was investigated. This increased the energy of the lowest electronic transition, and reduced the degree of ILCT in this transition, with behaviour tending towards more typical dppz as the linker became more insulating. The properties of the ligand 5,6,11,12,17,18 - hexaazatrinaphthalene (HATN) substituted with electron-donating sulfur groups were investigated. The mono-, bi- and tri-Re(CO)3Cl complexes of this ligand showed broad and intense visible absorption, which TD-DFT calculations suggested involved mixed MLCT/ILCT transitions. Resonance Raman spectroscopy was consistent with this, and time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy provided evidence for a mixed MLCT/ILCT excited state. Finally, a series of donor-acceptor compounds that are used in dye-sensitised solar cells are discussed, in order to try and understand what makes some more efficient than others. The first series were zinc porphyrin -based with carbazole -thiophene chains, which increased their visible absorption. The second series were organic dyes, also using a carbazole donor and thiophene chain, but for these compounds the reason for differences in solar cell performance could not be established with the techniques used.

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  • The natural history of autoimmune disorders in mice and its modification by therapy

    Casey, Thomas Patrick (1964)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    3 volumes; illustrations; diagrams. Thesis (M.D.) - University of Otago.

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  • The experiences of Korean immigrants settling in New Zealand: a process of regaining control

    Kim, Hagyun

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The success of all immigrants is significant to the harmony of New Zealand society since the government’s goal is to build an inclusive society. For many Korean immigrants, however, settling in an unfamiliar environment potentially disrupts familiar routines, with deleterious effects on almost all aspects of their well-being. Despite Koreans being the fourth largest group of Asian immigrants, their experiences of settling in this country have been unheard. The purpose of this study is to listen to the voices of Korean immigrants and provide information to the receiving society that will assist with developing ways to make a Korean presence part of the cultural diversity in society. This qualitative, grounded theory study included semi-structured interviews with 25 adult Korean immigrants living in the North Island of New Zealand. Theoretical sampling was used to collect data, which were analysed using methods of constant comparative analysis, conditional matrix and memoing. Through three stages of coding, data were fractured, conceptualised, and integrated to form a substantive grounded theory which has been named; A Process of Regaining Control: A Journey of Valuing Self. Upon arrival, participants confronted circumstances that made realising the anticipated benefits of immigration difficult. They experienced a loss of control in performing previously valued activities. Language barriers and limited social networks, compounded by prejudiced social reception, were associated with their decreased involvement outside the home, leading to fewer options for acquiring knowledge necessary to function autonomously in their new environment. In response, participants worked on Regaining Control by exercising choices over what they do through opting for enacting ‘Korean Ways’ or ‘New Zealand Ways’. They initially sought a culturally familiar environment in which they engaged in activities that involved drawing on previous knowledge and skills. Continuing with accustomed activities utilising ethnic resources provided a pathway to learning about their new surroundings and thus increasing their feeling of mastery in a new country. This experience strengthened participants’ readiness to engage in activities reflective of New Zealand society. The significance of this study is that it discovers that Valuing Self is what the participants wish to accomplish, beyond the scope of mastery in a new environment. Participants continually search for a place whereby they can be accepted and valued as members of society. However, this study reveals that prejudice and discrimination towards immigrants set constraints on engagement in occupations of meaning and choices. Immigrants face socio-environmental restriction when they continue with necessary or meaningful activities, even when they have the ability to execute a particular activity. This finding makes it clear that occupation is inseparable from the societal factors in which it occurs. Further research is necessary to explore societal contexts to enrich knowledge of human occupation and how immigrants’ full participation in civic society can be promoted. Specifically, it is recommended that researchers examine what makes Korean immigrants feel valued as members of society, from the participants’ point of view, in order to assist with the development of the settlement support policy and services that best facilitates their journeys of Valuing Self in New Zealand.

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  • The Role of Identity in India’s Expanding Naval Power

    SinghSan, Sandeep (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Since the end of the Cold War Indian political elites have demonstrated a remarkable predilection towards naval power in India’s grand strategy. Today, a naval modernization program is on the Indian agenda with emphasis on both the foreign acquisition and domestic construction of warships, submarines and battle fleets. The expensive capability accretion program is matched by a new penchant for articulating expansive naval doctrines and maritime strategy. This is a radical departure from the past where the Indian strategic community has often bemoaned the Indian political elite’s apparent ignorance of the potential of naval power. A number of reasons can be advanced to explain this change in the Indian political elite’s perception towards naval power. The predominant view in the literature favours material factors and India’s structural position as a source of this emerging maritime consciousness among the Indian political elite. While there are many compelling reasons for India to build a strong navy, this thesis suggests that an ideational factor related to India’s aspirations towards a new identity in the international system is an additional factor. India’s aspiration to become an Asia-Pacific power informs the Indian political elite’s new-found enthusiasm for naval power. As the Asia-Pacific region and the maritime disputes in the Asia-Pacific region assume growing importance in international politics, it is all the more important to understand India’s aspirations to transform itself into an Asia-Pacific power and how this shapes its naval strategy.

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  • Early Otago newspapers

    Clapperton, Barbara (1949)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    INTRODUCTION. It has been said with much truth that the newspaper of today is one of the world’s most influential text books. It is thus easy to appreciate the still greater importance of the newspaper of seventy-five or more years ago. Our present world with its great advances in science, with the invention and development of the radio, the facsimile newspaper, television, radio-type and newsreels offers many challenges to the ordinary newspaper. Seventy-five years ago such opponents were not known, and the newspaper took first place as the only medium by which local news and overseas news were transmitted to the public. The relation of the daily paper to the community was very aptly summed up by Julius Vogel who wrote in the first leading article in the Otago Daily Times, 15 November, 1861, and reprinted in the Diamond Jubilee Issue, 1921 ---“The benefits arising from a daily newspaper are not to be exaggerated. Independent of the opportunity it affords to the community of making its wants felt and its wishes known to the outside world, and so asserting its dignity and advancing its importance, the moral, social, and commercial influences of a daily journal are strongly marked. It brings the members of a community into a closer unity; knits bonds of fellowship between them, not easily severed; facilitates business, advances the value of property, and in short mixes itself up so intimately with the daily events of life that, once having experienced its benefits, its absence is nothing short of a public calamity”. That the value of a newspaper in any community was recognised is borne out by the number established throughout Otago during its earliest years, not least important of which was the Otago News published in the same year as the arrival of “John Wickliffe” and the Philip Laing”. In outlying districts as population grew and as industry flourished, there came also the press, helped greatly by the impetus of goldseeking. It is with the development of these early newspapers, with their ambitions and struggles - and in many cases their failures - that I am here concerned, for they are the record of courage and endeavour inherent in the making up of those early colonists.

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  • Loss aversion in schizotypy: Investigating decision-making in those with a liability to schizophrenia

    Goss, Kate Laura (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Loss aversion seems to be diminished or absent in schizophrenia patients, so the current study investigated this phenomenon in schizotypy. Undergraduate students from the University of Otago completed a hypothetical loss aversion task which involved naming prices at which they would be willing to buy or sell a one in ten chance to win a prize. One prize was mainly hedonic (a holiday) and the other was mainly utilitarian (paid rent). Loss aversion was measured by the ratio of prices participants were willing to accept when selling/willing to pay when buying. It was hypothesised that a majority of participants would show loss aversion, and this would be seen to a greater extent in the hedonic scenario than the utilitarian one. It was also hypothesised that components of schizotypy would be associated with reduced loss aversion, as would low anticipatory pleasure, poor memory and aberrant salience. Results showed that participants were biased towards avoiding loss. There was significantly more loss aversion for the hedonic than the utilitarian scenario as expected. There was no significant association between loss aversion and schizotypy although there was a slight trend in the expected direction shown by a near significant relationship between cognitive-perceptual schizotypy and low utilitarian loss aversion. There was also a significant relationship between low anticipatory pleasure and low utilitarian loss aversion, while there was no significant association between memory or aberrant salience and loss aversion. Overall, results suggest there may be a relationship between severity of illness and abnormal decision-making.

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  • Exploring educational efficiency in New Zealand primary and post-primary schooling, 1900-1945

    Frost, Anna Kathleen (1998)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 83 leaves :col. ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Education. "March 31, 1998."

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  • Reproduction and population genetics of the New Zealand brooding brittle star Ophiomyxa brevirima

    Garrett, Frank Kim (1994)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 133 leaves :ill. (some col.) :30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "December 1994." University of Otago department: Marine Science

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