25,587 results for Thesis

  • Exploring educational efficiency in New Zealand primary and post-primary schooling, 1900-1945

    Frost, Anna Kathleen (1998)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 83 leaves :col. ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Education. "March 31, 1998."

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  • Reproduction and population genetics of the New Zealand brooding brittle star Ophiomyxa brevirima

    Garrett, Frank Kim (1994)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 133 leaves :ill. (some col.) :30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "December 1994." University of Otago department: Marine Science

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  • Antarctic gateway cities & contemporary mobility : a comparative analysis of the two Antarctic gateway cities of Christchurch & Hobart

    Grace, Michael Russell Ian (2005)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 45 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Tourism. "March 2005".

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  • Samurai Lear? : the cross-cultural intertexuality of Akira Kurosawa's Ran

    Gorringe, Karl (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    186 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: English. "Date: August 20, 2007."

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  • Aspects of uncertainty in private and public law

    Grant, Malcolm J. (1972)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xvi, 260, 6, 18, 10, 4, 21 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Copyright and its digital challenge : a comparison of New Zealand and German copyright law

    Gutman, Daniel (2006)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    145, [17] leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Law. "17 October 2006".

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  • John Grierson, the NZNFU and the art of propaganda

    Hoskins, David John (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 187 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "6 February 2007." University of Otago department: Media, Film and Communication.

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  • Re-colonisation of a relocated boulder reef in Tauranga Harbour, New Zealand

    Graeme, Lindsay Megan (1995)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    109, xi leaves :music ; 27 cm. Bibliography: p. x-xi. University of Otago department: Marine Science. "March 1995."

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  • An examination of certain aspects of industrial relations ideologies : a theoretical analysis and an empirical study of managers

    Geare, Alan J. (1986)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    ix, 437 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 423-437. University of Otago department: Management.

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  • Are New Zealand Treaty of Waitangi settlements achieving justice? : the Ngai Tahu settlement and the return of Pounamu (greenstone)

    Gibbs, Meredith (2001)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 332 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Political Studies. "30 September 2001."

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  • Effect of estradiol on the ovarian surface epithelium in older mice

    Gulliver, Linda Shirley Mabelle (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    2 v. (xxxii, 573 leaves) :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "August 2009". University of Otago department: Anatomy and Structural Biology

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  • Expectations and satisfaction in tourism : an exploratory study into measuring satisfaction

    Gnoth, Juergen (1994)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xi, 277 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Marketing.

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  • "Fouling the nest" : the conflict between the 'church party' and settler society during the New Zealand Wars, 1860-1865

    Grimshaw, Michael P (1999)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    328 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Theology and Religious Studies

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  • Genetic Analysis Of South Island Malignant Melanoma Cases

    Ahn, Jeong (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Greater understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying recurrent driver mutations is revolutionising the clinical management of melanoma. However given the association between UV radiation and UV-associated DNA mutagenesis, there are emerging indications that NZ may have a distinctive pattern of recurrent mutations more representative of high UV exposure. In order to gain insight into the frequency of recurrent mutations in NZ and how it may impact the clinical management of melanoma, this project encompassed three aims. The first aim was to determine a robust protocol for DNA extraction from FFPE melanoma tissue, and then optimise PCR amplification and sequencing of BRAF, NRAS and RAC genes, and the TERT promoter. The Qiagen FFPE extraction kit provided DNA of sufficient quality and quantity. Optimal PCR amplification required the combined use of shorter amplicon fragments, KAPA2G Robust polymerase enzyme, a touchdown PCR cycle and nested PCR. Lastly, the purification of sequenced DNA products required either the EDTA-ethanol wash or the unifilter plate-sephadex resin method. The second aim evaluated the analytical performance of the novel Immunohistochemistry (IHC)-based VEI monoclonal antibody test to detect the BRAF V600E mutation status in comparison to two reference methods, the Cobas assay, which is the only adopted test in NZ for BRAF mutation testing, and conventional Sanger sequencing. IHC demonstrated the highest sensitivity for the detection of BRAF V600E and V600E2 mutations, which supports its use as a supplementary screening assay for determining the BRAF-mutant genotype. The final aim was to determine the frequency of recurrent mutations in the BRAF, NRAS and RAC1 genes and the promoter of TERT in South Island melanoma patients using 95 melanoma tissues from 87 patients with Sanger sequencing. A distinctive pattern of recurrent mutations was observed, which may be representative of chronic UV exposure. This included a relatively high frequency of melanomas wild-type for BRAF and NRAS mutations and a higher frequency of primary melanomas with TERT promoter mutations compared to studies in USA or Europe. This would then suggest that therapeutic regimes that target the non-BRAF-NRAS mutant subgroup and those with TERT promoter mutations may become more relevant in NZ. The results from the BRAF mutation study were compared with 2 external studies, a study using North Island melanoma samples (Wellington) and a study carried out on a national scale (Auckland, Tauranga and Christchurch). The frequency of the BRAF V600E mutation was found to be relatively low in NZ compared to USA or Europe. This is consistent with BRAF V600E mutations having an inverse association with chronic UV damage. Moreover, the low BRAF V600E mutation rate indicates the clinically approved targeted inhibitors for BRAF-mutant melanomas may be less relevant in the NZ population. The BRAF V600K mutation rate was found to be higher in the North Island compared to the South Island, which highlights a potential difference in mutation frequency between geographical locations within NZ. Overall, this study provides new insights of regarding a distinctive pattern of recurrent mutations in the South Island of NZ and NZ, more representative of chronic UV exposure. Furthermore this indicates the clinical management of melanoma may also be slightly different in NZ.

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  • Lungworm infection in farmed red deer

    Johnson, Marion Gay (2002)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Lungworm is the most important parasite of farmed red deer (Cervus elaphus) in New Zealand. Because of the morphological similarity between deer-derived and cattle-derived lungworm, it has been assumed that the lungworm infecting red deer is Dictyocaulus viviparus, the lungworm which causes "husk' in cattle. This programme has used light microscopy, electron microscopy, molecular techniques, cross-infection studies and immunisation to re-examine the issue of species identification of lungworm affecting farmed red deer and to study the pathological and immunological responses of deer to experimental challenge with lungworm derived from deer and cattle. Dictyocaulus larvae were isolated from properties on which the host of interest was the sole species grazed. The larvae were cultured and used to infect multiplier animals. Larvae were then cultured from the multiplier animals for use in trials. Examination of adults using light microscopy revealed differences between deer-derived lungworm and cattle-derived lungworm but these were hard to quantify. Using scanning electron microscopy the two could be clearly differentiated, the mouthparts of cattle origin lungworm were circular, those of deer origin lungworm elongate. Molecular analysis of the ITS-2 region confirmed a difference between the two lungworm isolates. The ITS-2 sequence of the lungworm derived from cattle matched that of Dictyocaulus viviparus. The sequence of the ITS-2 of lungworm derived from red deer matched that of D. eckerti, described from fallow deer (Dama dama). Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), a high resolution mutation detection method, provided a technically simple method of differentiating lungworm derived from many hosts, including cattle and red deer. In a cross-infection trial D. viviparus infections established in cattle, whereas deer derived lungworm did not. Red deer developed patent infections whether challenged with deer lungworm or D. viviparus. There were significant differences in the course of the infections, the host responses and the associated pathology. Huskvac, an irradiated larval vaccine available for use in cattle in Europe, was trialled in red deer in New Zealand. A group of cattle were used as a control to ensure the efficacy of the vaccine under local conditions. Huskvac protected cattle against a D. viviparus challenge. Red deer were afforded a degree of protection, in that patency was delayed by several days in vaccinated animals, larval output was lower and fewer adults established in the lungs. Although protection was irrespective of species challenge, some aspects of the host response differed according to the challenge species. The lungworm specific to red deer in New Zealand is not D. viviparus. It is probably D. eckerti, according to the current classification. Cross-infection does however occur and D. viviparus causes pathology in red deer, therefore contamination of pastures by grazing cattle is not recommended. As vaccination with Huskvac provided a degree of protection in red deer it is possible that vaccination using irradiated D. eckerti larvae may be more effective.

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  • The gift of the other: Levinas, Derrida, and a theology of hospitality

    Shepherd, Andrew Philip (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Despite the celebration of 'difference' and the rhetoric of 'connectedness', the so-called 'global village' of the early twenty-first century is far from a peaceful and harmonious reality. Powerful ideological discourses such as the market and the political 'war on terror' shape a world in which many, classified as Others, are excluded. Conceived of as abstract commodities competing for limited resources, or worse, as potential 'terrorists' coming to 'destroy civilization', Others are seen as threats. In this world of exclusion and hostility the Christian church is summoned to continue to witness to the good news of God's gracious hospitality. The practice of 'hospitality' -what Christine Pohl refers to as 'an essential part of Christian identity' - is, however, rendered problematic due to the emasculation and distortion of the term by the prevailing ideologies of our time. To engage in this historical and life-giving practice faithfully therefore requires a theological rehabilitation of the concept of 'hospitality'. This thesis undertakes this rehabilitative task in two ways. Firstly, the work engages with the work of prominent French philosophers Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida. In contrast to Cartesian western philosophical thought which has given primacy to the cogito, Levinas and Derrida claim that the self is constituted by the call of the Other. Instead of disregard or fear of the Other, their 'philosophies of hospitality' assert that authentic human existence is characterised by an 'infinite responsibility' before the face of the Other. While finding rich resources in Levinasian and Derridean thought, there are weaknesses and limitations in their respective understandings of selfhood, inter-human relationality, eschatology and teleology, and the differential ontology upon which their ethical philosophies are grounded. Therefore, while continuing the dialogue with Levinas and Derrida, section two of this thesis offers an explicitly theological account of 'hospitality'. Whereas Levinasian-Derridean thought implies that tension and hostility are both ontologically intrinsic and insurmountable, the Christian doctrines of Trinity, creation, and sin offer an ontology of primordial communion in which hostility is understood as arising from the failure of humanity to live in communion with others. This hostility is overcome in the 'once for all' death of Jesus. This sacrificial and substitutionary action, far from sacralising violence and turning suffering into a virtue, prevails over human enmity and offers the true form of personhood. Those who through faith accept this 'gift of God' are indwelt by the presence of the Spirit of the resurrected Christ and incorporated into a new form of sociality - the ecclesia. The alienated self, discomforted by the disturbing Other, undergoes a makeover and is transformed into an ecclesial self; expanded to 'make room' for otherness. Fear is replaced by love, and appropriative desire gives way to mutual gift-exchange. Undergoing this gradual transformation, the ecclesia is empowered to participate in God's redemptive purposes being enacted in the world and thus becomes a witness to God's hospitality.

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  • Ngati Apa: Legally sound but bravely apolitical

    Dunlop, Jane (2005)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    University of Otago department: Law.

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  • A world of (linguistic) possibility : the rights-consistent interpretive directives of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 and the United Kingdom Human Rights Act 1998

    Fenton, Bridget (2007)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 89 leaves :col. ill., maps (some folded) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 84-89) University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Trichosurus vulpecula and rattus norvegious in the epidemiology of two arboviruses.

    Dempster, Alexander George (1964)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 70 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Assessing the impact of human disturbance on penguins

    Ellenberg, Ursula (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xix, 257 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm.

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