26,369 results for Thesis

  • Threads of inequity: the marginalisation of New Zealand area schools

    Fisk, Robert William (2002)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xi, 471 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Education. "August 27th, 2002."

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  • A study of a silver beech stand in the Silver Peaks State Forest

    Armstrong, Patricia (1979)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    20 leaves : ill., map ; 32 cm. Unpublished material. Research paper (B. Sc. (Hons.)) -- University of Otago, 1979.

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  • The impact of hyperuricemia on pancreatic beta-cell function and the development of diabetes mellitus

    Johnstone, Ryan Davic (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Uric acid or urate is an organic anion produced in the liver from alcohol, fructose and protein metabolism. Urate levels in humans are much higher than that of other animals, sometimes by a factor of 10. The most commonly thought of disease associated with high urate levels, or hyperuricemia, is gout. Historically gout was colloquially known as the ‘kings disease’, whereby only the kings could consume large quantities of meat and alcohol thereby raising urates levels. Nowadays, many people are able to ‘eat like kings’, in that high calorific foods are readily available and cheap. As a consequence urate levels around the world have increased and are still rising. In parallel with this treat is the much well publicised disease of diabetes mellitus. Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is considered, by many, as the biggest health issue of the 21st century. With that in mind, this project sets out to provide evidence that urate may be a contributing factor in T2DM. The two characteristics of T2DM that this project will focus around are a reduction in insulin secretion and reduced β-cell mass. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is considered the major cellular energy sensor. The protein is responsive to changes in ATP:ADP ratio within the cell and able to coordinate a wide range of downstream pathways once activated/phosphorylated. It is a key target in the treatment of diabetes whereby its activation in liver, adipose and skeletal muscle lower blood glucose levels and increase insulin sensitivity. However, it has counterproductive effects in pancreatic β-cells whereby its activation inhibits insulin secretion and may even promote apoptosis. The other target in this project is the microRNA miR-34a. MiR-34a has negative effects on cell survival such as inhibiting cell cycle progression and promoting apoptosis. What’s interesting about this microRNA, and particularly relevant for this project, is that miR-34a has been shown to be the one of the most consistent microRNAs the expression of which increases under diabetic conditions. Its elevated expression in circulating plasma of pre-diabetes has even been suggested as a marker for type-2 diabetes development. In this study I tested whether hyperuricemic conditions influence the expression of AMPK and miR-34a in cultured pancreatic β-cells and I postulate that the urate transporter GLUT9 is the transporter responsible for the urate-induced effects. Hyperuricemic conditions increased the expression of the α1-AMPK subunit and miR-34a after chronic exposures. Hyperuricemia also activated apoptotic cascades and reduced cell viability, which was attenuated with urate transport inhibition. Lastly, siRNA knockdown of GLUT9 significantly reduced the increase in miR-34a expression under hyperuricemic conditions providing evidence for GLUT9 as the primary urate transporter in β-cells. Because the above experiments were carried out in both mouse and human cells this may reflect that urate regulates basic (conserved) mechanisms in β-cells. In light of this, pathological hyperuricmia may contribute to reduced insulin secretin and β-cell death and therefore be implicated in the development of T2DM.

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  • An Intracellular Probe of Hsc70:Substrate Interactions

    Moir, Rachel (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Hsc70 is a constitutively active member of the heat shock chaperone family. It has many roles in all cell types, including prevention of protein aggregation, uncoating of clathrin vesicles, and involvement in the maturation of newly synthesised protein. ABCA1, a member of the ABC family, has been shown to have mutations that disrupt membrane localisation. The rescue of correct maturation and membrane localisation by chemical chaperones suggest a role for protein misfolding and endogenous molecular chaperones such as Hsc70 in its rescue. The mutants utilised in this study have distorted folding in such a manner that the activity is lost due to the inability to mature through trafficking to the plasma membrane where the protein is functional. In this work a fluorescent Hsc70 probe was produced and a method developed for its introduction into mammalian cells to investigate an interaction with misfolded ABCA1. Co-localisation of the Hsc70 chaperone with mislocalised ABCA1 variants were investigated with confocal microscopy. Hsc70 C574S, required for covalent attachment of a single fluorescent label, is active at about 25% the level of native protein in a refolding assay. The transduction protocol results in some fluorescent Hsc70 being internalised into HEK293T mammalian cells. Efficiency of transduction was assessed by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Between 20% and 90% of cells were found to be transduced with fluorescent protein. Labelled Hsc70 appears in the cytoplasm, distributed in the same pattern as wildtype ABCA1, suggesting co-localisation. The coincidence of location increases with the N1800H variant. However membrane location does not seem to be rescued by transduction of additional Hsc70. The Y1767D variant seems to have a lesser interaction with Hsc70, although this could be an artefact of the labelled chaperone, where endogenous untracked Hsc70 could be interacting. Hsc70 has been successfully used as an intracellular probe, detectable in HEK293T cells and displaying co-localisation with the ABCA1 protein.

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  • The meaning of fascia in a changing society

    Adstrum, Nichola Sue (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Fascia is an anatomical term whose meaning has evolved during the past four hundred years. It is generally applied to the body’s fibrous membranes and the tissue they are composed of, yet this concept appears to be unevenly interpreted and frequently overlooked by bioscientific, clinical, and community health writers. This is of concern as an institutional attachment to a traditional yet possibly not up-to-date understanding of fascia might not best serve the complex health needs of present-day New Zealand (NZ) society. A recent change in the way fascia is acknowledged in the literature may signal a shift from traditional anatomical knowledge to its more holistic interpretation within an emerging interdisciplinary discourse field. This investigation aims to discover whether there may be a similar difference in the way fascia is comprehended by NZ’s multiple discipline-spanning healthcare community within the context of NZ society’s health system, as that diversity, should it exist, might affect cross-disciplinary and broader community discussion about the morphology, performance, and remedial treatment of the body and its soft tissue elements. This study’s use of a transdisciplinary perspective and interpretative methodology for fascia research is linked to Heidegger’s epistemic directive that it is necessary to develop new ways of observing phenomena if we want to expand, rather than simply enhance, pre-existing knowledge of the phenomenon in question. Ethnographic fieldwork methods (semistructured interviews and participant observation) were used to obtain data about how knowledge of fascia is included within the baccalaureate-level anatomy instruction of dentists, doctors, massage therapists, midwives, occupational therapists, osteopaths, and physiotherapists; and in five (Anatomy Trains, CranioSacral Therapy, Fascial Kinetics, Kinesio Taping, and Manual Lymphatic Drainage) introductory-level bodywork seminars, mainly attended by practicing massage therapists and physiotherapists. The research explores how the above-mentioned groups of students’ instructors (this study’s participants) understand and teach their students about fascia. Thematic analysis of the pooled interview transcripts and fieldnotes reveals disparities in how fascia is construed by the participants, and also in how and to what extent it is portrayed to their respective cohorts of students. This study indicates that the participants generally construe fascia either as a range of distinct inert membranous structures, or as a pervasive dynamic soft connective tissue system that manifests in a variety of interrelated forms. While both viewpoints are consistent with the way fascia is concurrently described in the amassed literature, the data suggest the emergent and ostensibly more expansive interpretation of fascia is likely to have been prompted by changes in the fabric of society and its healing practices rather than the continuous progression of an established body of scholarly knowledge. From a Foucaudian position this study’s exposure of what appears to be a discontinuous progression in how fascia is known is important, as such a change could conceivably be enduring and far reaching in its effect. It may therefore be timely to carefully reconsider our own views on this subject.

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  • An investigation into estimation and spatial sense as aspects of workplace numeracy: a case study of recycling and refuse operators within a situated learning model

    Kane, Philip John

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The abilities to estimate and to exercise spatial awareness are important elements of adult numeracy and are embedded in many workplace activities. However, contributions of these elements of numeracy in workplace activities are often overlooked. Although estimation is noticed, spatial awareness in particular seems to be rarely acknowledged (Marr & Hagston, 2007). This research study first investigates the use of these two elements by drawing on the perspective of numeracy as a situated social practice (Lerman, 2006; Street, Baker, & Tomlin, 2008) in a case study of the work of urban recycling and refuse collection operators. Ethnographic approaches such as observing the operators’ roles in their daily collection work and interviewing them are used to determine which strategies and numeracy practices the operators employ. What is seen is that a collection operator’s ability to estimate and use spatial awareness are important contributors to many of the critical decisions that are regularly made by him or her. A second part of the research is an investigation of how these operators have acquired the capabilities to make estimates and to be spatially aware. Although estimation and spatial awareness are established at an early age and then partly fostered in school mathematics themes such as number sense, measurement and geometry, the operators in the main did not recognise a great deal of mathematics in their everyday work. Instead their previous workplace training and experiences of driving and operating heavy equipment appeared to be the main sources of their senses of estimation and spatial awareness. This study demonstrates to trainers and educators they should not assume that these elements of numeracy are common knowledge or even common sense to their staff or students (Sorby, 2003). This study also suggests that estimation and spatial awareness practices which are concealed in workplaces and are probably overlooked, are challenging to assess by traditional measures. Hence trainers and educators need to continue to promote and model estimation practices, and even more deliberately, provide learning opportunities of those relevant components of spatial awareness for learners of any age.

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  • The medical, ethical and legal issues surrounding the management of persistent vegetative state patients

    Bloore, Samuel Geoffrey (2004)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 72 leaves ; 30 cm Includes bibliographical references. "1st July 2004"

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  • Waiata whakamaumahara ki ngā kaiherehere nō Taranaki i Ōtepoti i tērā rautau kua pahemo

    Taylor, Robert (1997)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    Mō ngā whakaritenga o te MAOR 490 He Raukura

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  • Quantitation and Localization of Bioactive Natural Products by Spectroscopic Methods

    Killeen, Daniel Patrick (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    This thesis describes spectroscopic analyses of plants which derive some, or all, of their commercial value from their secondary metabolites. The primary aim was to assess vibrational spectroscopy as a tool for rapid selection of commercially valuable crops. An equally important research direction was the exploration of the spatial distribution of plant secondary metabolites using Raman microscopy. Raman spectra of powdered carrot (Daucus carota) were used to produce partial least squares regression models capable of quantitating carotenoids, but not polyacetylenes. The Raman and infrared spectra of powdered hops (Humulus lupulus) were used to quantitate α-acids, cohumulone, total bitter acids and xanthohumol. NIR spectra of the same samples could be used to predict the concentrations of α-acids and total bitter acids but not the concentrations of cohumulone or xanthohumol. Raman microscopy was used to show that polyacetylene-rich oils exude from sub-dermal oil ducts in response to damage. This analysis was performed on fresh, sectioned carrot tissue in situ). The same technique was used to demonstrate that β-triketones and flavonoids are localized in the leaf oil glands of manuka (Leptospermum scoparium). Raman spectra of these oil glands could also be used to rapidly distinguish manuka chemotypes. Hops extracellular trichomes (lupulin) could also be used for rapidly chemotyping of hops cultivars and, more importantly, this analysis could be used to rapidly measure commercially important hops chemistry (i.e. xanthohumol concentrations and α:β acid ratios). In the pursuit of these primary objectives, some related research avenues were encountered, and followed. These included: a comprehensive characterization of lupulin volatiles using solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography, a similarly comprehensive analysis of lupulin bitter acids using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; isolation and characterization of three new β-triketones and a new flavanone from manuka; and the application of chemometrics to chromatographic and nuclear magnetic resonance data-sets.

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  • A time varying study of water view premiums in relation to residential house prices

    Plimmer, Christopher

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    In contrast to the large body of research that exists on the impact of water view premiums of on the value of residential properties there are relatively few studies that look at how these premiums vary over time. A Water view premium has a significant impact on a residential property's value as indentified in previous studies and therefore understanding the way in which the water view premium behaves over time is of major importance and has significant implications for residential property valuation. This study aims to better understand the behavioural patterns of the water view premiums over time and determine if there are any linkages between market cycles by comparing the movements of the water view premium to the market index and another leading study that looks at water view premiums over time. This study analyses 3842 residential property sales from 4 similar Auckland suburbs for the period from 2005 to 2013. The sales are analysed using hedonic linear regression models with dummy variables for the presence of water views to isolate the water view coefficient for each of the years. The movements of the water view premium is then compared against a market index for the same period and the results also compared against another similar study from an earlier period. The results indicate a strong behavioural pattern between the correlation of the market growth and water view premium growth. A pattern emerges that suggests that for a short time after a market has recovered from a period of major negative growth (a market crash), the water view premium has a period of dramatic positive growth that is greater than the growth of the market. This pattern is also evident when comparing the results to the earlier study.

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  • Infant and peer relationships in curriculum

    Redder, Bridgette Miriam (2014)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this thesis was to explore the relations between infants and their peers as they interacted intersubjectively with one another in an early childhood care and education environment and to investigate how the teacher was answerable through her engagement in these intersubjective events. Drawing upon a Bakhtinian methodological approach to research utterance was employed as my unit of analysis, providing a means to investigate the intersubjective interactions between infants and their peers in tandem with the teachers’ engagement in these interactions as answerable acts. This thesis builds on a previous pilot study which utilised dialogic methodology to investigate the nature of infant and teacher dialogue in an education and care context (White, Peter & Redder, 2015). The research that formed the basis for my subsequent analysis took place in a New Zealand education and care centre that catered for children less than two years of age. In the present study the same polyphonic video recording was used to capture infant and peer intersubjective interactions and the teacher’s engagement within these events. A mixed methods research approach was employed to qualitatively and quantitatively analyse the video data. The findings of this study suggest that infants are intersubjective agents in their relationships with peers and with teachers. Infants intentionally communicated with peers in lived relational experiences that were characterised by the fleeting, elongated or connected nature of their interactions. Mutual understanding, joint attention, attunement and the employment of synchronised language forms were features of infant ― peer intersubjective experiences. In addition, the findings revealed the capacity of infants and peers to relate with one another in social interactions that promote ‘dialogic spaces’ through which intersubjective relationships are sought. When teachers engaged in the infant ― peer intersubjective relations they either restrained by ‘shutting’ down or sustained by ‘opening up’ the intersubjective experience for the peers. The teacher’s body language was a feature of their engagement that contributed in a variety of ways to the infant ― peer intersubjective experience. Indeed how teachers engaged themselves in the interactions that were taking place between infants and their peers often determined the orientation of the teacher’s body positioning. The findings suggest when teachers restrained infant ― peer intersubjective dialogue, this form of engagement had the potential to alter how infants related to peers in subsequent interactions, highlighting the importance of sensitive, ‘in tune’ teacher engagement. Furthermore, the results highlight the pivotal role of the teacher as a ‘connecting’ feature within infant and peer intersubjective experiences, one who has the potential to ‘open up’ dialogic spaces for infants and their peer partners through engagement that is dialogic. These findings taken together may have implications for policymakers, educators and teacher education by ‘opening up’ dialogic spaces through which infants are seen as intersubjective agents and dialogic partners.

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  • A New Form of Authoritarianism? Rethinking Military Politics in Post-1999 Nigeria

    Adeakin, Ibikunle Edward (2015)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Waikato

    Despite the vast research that has been done on the Nigerian military, virtually all of these studies have failed to critically examine the accepted role of the military in the democratising phase. This is important because the relationship between the political elite and the military in post-military authoritarian states guarantees either democratic consolidation, or its reversal. In Nigeria, despite an appearance of significant progress in subordinating the military institution to democratic civilian authority, the military remains a crucial political actor in the polity. It appears that the military has yet to accept the core democratic principles of civilian oversight of the institution. This thesis, therefore, explores whether a new form of military authoritarianism is emerging in Nigeria, with the aim of understanding Nigeria’s military behaviour in a transitional phase, from prolonged military authoritarianism to democratisation. To examine this military behaviour, Alfred Stepan’s concept of military prerogatives that was used to understand the military’s behaviour in a transitional phase in Latin America is applied to Nigeria. A crucial understanding of authoritarianism in Nigeria is initially discussed in this study using mainly document analysis strategy to examine whether multi-ethnic states, such as Nigeria, tend to have authoritarian systems. Six hypotheses form the core analysis of this thesis: first, that the military has retained significant military prerogatives; second, that retired military officers are gaining influential political and economic positions; third, autonomous military involvement in human rights abuses since 1999; and fourth, that civilian government oversight remains weak, and facilitates military authoritarianism. These hypotheses are primarily analysed using the elite interview technique. During the first half of 2011, the author conducted field research where serving and retired military officers were interviewed. The fifth hypothesis is that the military has intervened in politics post-1999. The examination of this hypothesis relies primarily on key security-related media reports (mostly newspaper editorials) on the military after 1999. The examination of the final hypothesis, that increases in military expenditures might facilitate a new form of military authoritarianism, relies primarily on descriptive statistical analysis. In addition, this study collated relevant historical materials that relate to the military, utilising national archival collections. The empirical findings of this research did not identify a new form of military authoritarianism in Nigeria. The study, however, argues that the unrestricted institutional framework accorded the military has contributed significantly to authoritarian practices in the post-military era in Nigeria. This study discovered that there were similarities between the Brazilian and Nigerian militaries in regard to their military spending during their period in power. Both countries had lower defence budgets. Just as in Brazil, it appears that part of the reason the Nigerian military decided to relinquish power in 1999 had to do with its desire to gain a higher budget, something that was precluded in a military government struggling to retain a sense of legitimacy. The military needed a higher budget to modernise and re-professionalise its institution after more than a decade in power. This feature, which the Nigerian military shares with the Brazilian military, appears to justify the application to Nigeria of Alfred Stepan’s concept of military prerogatives.  

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  • In a field of their own : farm transfer and farmers' 'sense of place'

    Chapman, Craig Murray (1998)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    84 leaves, [14] leaves of plates :ill., ports. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 80-84). University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • Climate change and the water yield of snow tussock grasslands in the Upper Taieri Catchment

    Cameron, Janine (2004)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 66 leaves :ill., facsim., maps, ports. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 63-66). University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • On the edge : a history of adventure sports and adventure tourism in Queenstown

    Brown, Michael Neal Rowatt (1997)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xvi, 219 leaves :col. ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Packing down the scrum: an historical analysis of the 1981 Springbok tour and the homosexuality issue in the Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand

    Brown, Michael Neal Rowatt (1995)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Physical description: iii, 68 leaves ; 30 cm. Covers the years 1981 through to 1995. Thesis (B.A. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 1995. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 66-68).

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  • For the lesser peoples : Woodrow Wilson, national self-determination and the Ottoman Empire.

    Flaherty, Timothy James (1997)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    66, [iv] leaves ; 29 cm. Bibliography: leaves 64-66.

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  • The Workers' Dwellings Acts : their implementation in Dunedin, 1905-1916

    Elworthy, Eve (1987)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    2 v. :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • Black and white art' : the depiction of Maori in cartoons, 1900-1920.

    Custer, Erika K. (1994)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    Typescript (photocopied)

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  • Silent Sentinels : The War Trophies of the First New Zealand Expeditionary Force in War and Peace

    Fox, Aaron Patrick (1987)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    The author has made available an updated and illustrated version of this dissertation at: http://www.kiamatetoa.com/drathesis.php

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