26,916 results for Thesis

  • What can secondary student teachers learn from a day in a primary school? The impact of a primary field observation in secondary initial teacher education

    Fielding, Karyn Ann (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This research examined the effects of a 1-day observation in a primary school for the 2012 (n = 68) and 2013 (n = 65) cohorts of secondary initial teacher education (ITE) students in New Zealand. Reflective journal entries on the field observation and 16 individual interviews yielded 5 themes: The value of an observational visit in a primary setting for secondary ITE students as a representation of practice (Grossman, Compton, Igra, Ronfeldt, Shahan & Williamson, 2009), learner development primary to secondary school transitions, enhancing pedagogical knowledge of group learning, and enhancing pedagogical knowledge of curriculum integration. This sample of secondary student teachers valued observing for a day in a primary school as an opportunity to: consider learner transitions; link theory, teaching techniques, and strategies covered at university to practice in the field; and, affirm career choice. For some secondary student teachers, a day observing in a primary school enhanced their pedagogical knowledge of group learning and curriculum integration. They gained a richer understanding of learner development and transitions from primary to secondary school, and a greater appreciation of the professional practice of teachers in another sector.

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  • Acute cardiac admissions after natural disasters - Insight from the Christchurch earthquakes

    Chan, Christina Wei-Hsin (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Introduction It is known that acute cardiovascular events can be triggered by external factors among susceptible individuals. Previous studies have shown an increased risk of acute cardiac events following psychosocial and environmental triggers such as warfare, national sporting events and natural disasters. Earthquakes are well documented to cause cardiac complications. This topic is perhaps the hardest to study due to the unpredictable nature of the disaster. Often, severe destruction of the infrastructure and medical facilities hinders stringent study methodology. Christchurch, New Zealand, was struck by 2 major earthquakes at 4:36am on 4 September 2010, magnitude 7.1 and at 12:51pm on 22 February 2011, magnitude 6.3. Both events caused widespread destruction. Christchurch Hospital, the region’s only acute care hospital, was fortunate to have escaped major damage. It remained functional following both earthquakes. We sought to examine thoroughly the effects of the 2 earthquakes on acute cardiac presentations and their sequelae. We hypothesised that there would be an increase in overall chest pain admission, a surge of acute myocardial infarction and stress cardiomyopathy cases and that major earthquakes of different intensity, occurring at different times of the day would result in different cardiovascular presentation patterns. Methods Patients admitted under Cardiology in Christchurch Hospital 3 weeks prior to and 5 weeks following both earthquakes were analysed, with corresponding control periods in September 2009 and February 2010. Patients were categorised based on diagnosis: ST elevation myocardial infarction, Non ST elevation myocardial infarction, stress cardiomyopathy, unstable angina, stable angina, non-cardiac chest pain, arrhythmia and other. A sub-group analysis as well as a follow up study at 12 months was done for patients who presented with stress cardiomyopathy following the February 2011 earthquake. Results In the first 2 weeks following the early morning September earthquake, there was a significant increase in overall cardiovascular admissions (mean 75 admissions per week during the control periods, 120 admissions in week 1 and 100 admissions in week 2, p=0.003), ST elevation myocardial infarction (mean 5 cases per week during the control periods, 9 cases in week 1 and 11 cases in week 2, p=0.016), and non-cardiac chest pain (mean 29 cases per week during the control periods, 46 cases in week 1 and 36 cases in week 2, p=0.022). This pattern was not seen after the early afternoon February earthquake. Instead, there was a very large number of stress cardiomyopathy admissions with 21 cases (95% CI 2.6-6.4) in 4 days compared to only 6 stress cardiomyopathy cases after the first earthquake (95% CI 0.44 – 2.62; p<0.05). At 12 months, a follow-up study of the 21 patients with stress cardiomyopathy triggered by the second earthquake showed 100% survival rate with the majority free from cardiovascular, other medical or psychological sequelae. Conclusion The early morning September 2010 earthquake triggered a large increase in ST elevation myocardial infarction and a few stress cardiomyopathy cases. The early afternoon February earthquake, although smaller in Richter scale, was far more destructive compared to the first event given its shallow depth and closeness to the city centre. It caused significantly more stress cardiomyopathy in an already vulnerable population that may have been sensitised by the first earthquake. Two major earthquakes of different intensity, occurring at different times differed in their effect on acute cardiac events. Patients who had stress cardiomyopathy as the result of earthquakes had excellent prognosis in the intermediate follow-up period.

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  • The influence of Gremlin-induced BMP inhibition and subsequent associated genetic interactions in Xenopus laevis limb development

    Keenan, Samuel Rhys (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The tetrapod limb is one of the most extensively studied organs within the field of developmental biology, due to its highly conserved development involving key molecular pathways (Jones et al. 2013). The bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signalling cascade is an example of such important developmental pathway, known to induce apoptotic activity and skeletal element formation within developing limbs (Chen et al. 2004). Gremlin (grem1), a BMP antagonist, is known to regulate the fibroblast growth factor-sonic hedgehog (FGF-shh) signalling loop, which controls the early outgrowth and termination of tetrapod limbs, including Xenopus laevis (Christen et al. 2012; Zeller et al. 2009). As tetrapod limb development is a tightly controlled process, modification to associated gene expression can alter downstream signalling and subsequent limb development, giving rise to limb abnormalities (Jones et al. 2013). This project aims to investigate the genetic and developmental effects that ectopic grem1 overexpression has in X. laevis limb development, focused on abnormality development, and the expression intensity and distribution of specific BMP and limb pattern marker genes. Transgenic X. laevis containing a heat shock-inducible grem1 gene, were induced to ectopically overexpress grem1 at various limb development stages. Samples were allowed to develop, skeletal elements were counted, and resultant limb developmental effects were contrasted to wild type samples using cartilage and bone staining, and in situ hybridisation methods. Grem1 overexpression during stage 49 samples, where the hindlimb bud was within the early propagation phase, was shown to have the significantly highest abnormality diversity and proportions when compared to other limb development stages. This was possibly due to decreased limb BMP activity, and subsequent increased FGF (cell proliferation) and decreased sox9 (cartilage formation) activity, resulting in limb bifurcations and truncations, respectively. Significantly fewer digits developed in stage 49 limb samples, with digit IV having significantly fewer phalanges than other digits. Earlier stage grem1 overexpression resulted in more proximally located abnormalities, such as formation of ectopic limbs, showing a time-dependent effect of grem1 within limb development. The in situ hybridisation data showed grem1 overexpression to decrease specific BMP expression intensity; increase proximodistal limb axis FGF expression distribution; increase anteroposterior limb axis shh expression distribution; and increase chondrogenesis-associated sox9 expression distribution. These results concurred with a tetrapod limb developmental model based on chick and mouse data (Verheyden & Sun 2008; Zeller et al. 2009). In conclusion, this work summarised the tetrapod limb development literature, which detailed the importance of regulated grem1 and specific BMP pathway gene expression in regards to the complex normal limb development process in the amphibian model. It also demonstrated possible means of limb abnormality development amongst the tetrapod group, such as differences between serial and mirror bifurcations, which could be useful for experimental and clinical cases. The use of a heat shock technique to overexpress a gene of interest has been proven successful. Grem1 function within X. laevis when compared to chick and mouse models was similar based on relevant studies, but not identical, suggesting limb development needs many models rather than the more extensively researched chick and mouse models. The BMPs inhibited by grem1 were not exclusive to grem1, as they are also inhibited by other BMP inhibitors, but rather the binding efficiency and timing to specific combinations of BMPs differentiates BMP inhibitors.

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  • Geology of the southern portion of the Greenhills ultramafic complex

    O’Loughlin, Benjamin (1998)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Exposed along a three kilometre stretch of coastline on the southern extremities of the South Island, New Zealand are a suite of calc-alkaline to tholeiitic ultramafic and gabbroic rocks which form the southern portion of the Greenhills Ultramafic Complex (GUC). This complex consists of a layered series of dunite, wehrlite, olivine-clinopyroxenite and gabbro of Earliest Triassic age (247Ma), which intrude Lower Permian meta-sedimentary lithologies of the Greenhills Group. Accompanying the intrusion of the complex is a narrow contact metamorphic aureole which decreases rapidly in grade from pyroxene-hornfels facies metamorphism, directly adjacent to the body, to regional prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphism, with distance from the contact. The layered series of the GUC is stratigraphically divisible into an upper gabbroic portion of both non-cumulate and cumulate gabbroic rocks, and a lower ultramafic portion of dunite, wehrlite and olivine-clinopyroxenite. The lower ultramafic portion shows well-developed accumulate structures and textures that are typical of stratiform cumulate intrusions. Widespread slumping in the layered series in addition to discrete zones of intense brecciation, faulting, and multiple phases of dyke injection indicate recurring conditions of instability during the evolution of the complex. Textural, mineralogical, and chemical evidence suggests that two gabbro suites comprise the upper gabbroic portion. Namely, a cumulate suite (Shipwreck Gabbro) that is closely related to the lower ultramafic portion, and a non-cumulate (Barracouta Point Gabbro) suite, which is thought to have crystallised from a mixed magma. Whole rock chemistry of the layered series indicates a clear magmatic fractionation trend through dunite to gabbro, consistent with chemical fractionation from a basaltic parental magma. This trend is characterised by a systematic decrease in magnesium content with a concordant increase in silica, aluminium, calcium, and alkalis. A similar fractionation trend is exhibited by the evolution of the primary mineral phases olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase through the layered series. The theory that the GUC may have been derived by dry partial melting of the mantle wedge is supported by the similarity in trace element chemistry between the GUC and N-type Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB). Similarly, the trace element chemistry correlates well with recent basalts and basaltic andesites from the Tonga-Kermadec Island Arc, indicating that present day active ocean-ocean island arc subduction zones may serve as closely representative models for the evolution of remnant arcs such as that inferred for the GUC. The development of a strong tholeiitic to calc-alkaline island arc chemistry in the GUC is typical for magmatic bodies throughout the Brook Street Terrane, which are thought to represent the remnant of an ancient island arc system. A comparison of chemistry between the GUC and that of the Blashke Islands Alaskan-type intrusion from SE Alaska, indicates that these two bodies have been de1ived by fractional crystallisation of a closely similar parental magma, and thus, the GUC can be classified as a Alaskan-type Intrusion. The Greenhills Ultramafic Complex was produced as the result of crystal settling during fractional crystallisation of a basaltic parental magma produced by dry melting of the mantle wedge in an ocean-ocean island arc subduction zone. Modification of the layered body by magmatic slumping, mingling and brecciation and faulting depict recurring conditions of instability within the pluton which is considered typical of island arc subduction zones.

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  • City pigeons : Kererū (Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae) in the urban Dunedin environment : abundance, habitat selection and rehabilitation outcomes

    Daglish, Lisa (2005)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 180 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript. University of Otago department: Zoology.

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  • Ideological choice in the gravestones of Dunedin's Southern Cemetery

    Edgar, Philip Gerard (1995)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xxv, 136 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Anthropology. "December 1995."

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  • An examination of some relationships between the New Zealand jurisprudence of shared, equal parental rights and responsibilities & the gendered hierarchy of care 1994-2002

    Evans, Marian J. (2004)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xiv, 258 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 184-207. University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Effects of ocean acidification on fertilisation and early development in polar and temperate marine invertebrates

    Ericson, Jessica (2010)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    243 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliography. University of Otago department: Marine Science.

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  • Children's insights into family discipline

    Dobbs, Terry Anne (2005)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 155 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 126-127. University of Otago department: Children's Issues Centre. "January, 2005".

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  • A stochastic computer simulation of island group colonisation by Rattus norvegicus in small near shore island systems : specifically Tia island and the Boat group

    Coutts, Shaun Raymond (2005)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    212 leaves :port ; 30 cm. [Bibliography] : l.201-2121. January 2005'. University of Otago department: Zoology

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  • The nutrient and photosynthetic eco-physiology of Undaria pinnatifida, with applications to aquaculture

    Dean, Paul Robert (1998)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xiii, 173 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Marine Science.

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  • The dilemmas of displacement : revitalisation and gentrification in inner city Wellington, New Zealand

    Crack, Charlotte Emily (2005)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 132 leaves :col. ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • The Protean grid : Milan Mrkusich, formalism and change

    Craig, Chrissie (2004)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 103 leaves :charts, music ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 88-89. University of Otago department: Art History and Theory. "December 2004."

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  • "Church state relations in New Zealand 1940-1990, with particular reference to the Presbyterian and Methodist churches"

    Evans, John Adsett (1992)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xv, 179, [10] leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Theology

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  • Spirituality in New Zealand hospice care

    Egan, Richard Michael Martin (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xv, 362 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "July 2009". University of Otago department: General Practice

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  • An axial system of tonality applied to progressive tonality in the works of Gustav Mahler and nineteenth-century antecedents

    Downes, Graeme (1994)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    ix, 308 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Music.

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  • The epidemiology and control of cervical cancer

    Cox, Brian (1989)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    xv, 405 leaves :ill. ; 31 cm. Bibliography: leaves 348-376.

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  • "Don't just visit. Live it!" : a descriptive study of Japan exchange and teaching programme participants' experiences in Miyazaki prefecture

    Doering, Timothy Adam (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: v, 166 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm. Notes: "June 28, 2007" -- t.p. University of Otago department: Tourism. Thesis (M. Tour.)--University of Otago. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Practising Tamariki 'Āngai : Mangaia's informal island adoption

    Dodson, Marsa A (2009)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: xv, 410 p. : ill., maps ; 30 cm. Notes: University of Otago department: Social Work and Community Development. "21 August 2009." Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Otago, 2010. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Effectiveness of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) in addressing development-induced disasters: a comparison of the EIA processes of Sri Lanka and New Zealand

    Hapuarachchi, Arosh Buddika

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    There is an on-going exponential increase in development-induced disasters globally, especially in low and middle-income countries. This upward trend in the occurrence of development-induced disasters challenges sustainable development efforts. It has been generally accepted that instruments such as an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) reduce disaster risks of development projects. The Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA) for disaster risk reduction promotes using EIAs to address the disaster risk of development projects. Over 65 percent of the countries that have met the HFA progress-reporting obligation in the 2009-2011 reporting cycle, state that disaster risks of development projects are addressed by implementing EIA. However, the claims that EIA processes effectively address disaster risks have yet to be demonstrated empirically. It is clear that successful implementation of EIA processes also depends on the level of governance quality existing in a particular country. It is suggested that a well-conceived EIA process should reflect many of the elements of good governance principles including transparency, sufficient information flows, accountability, and stakeholder participation. Quality governance, therefore, is considered as having a direct bearing on why impact assessments in some countries are performing better than others. The influence of governance quality on the effectiveness of EIAs can be addressed by comparing the EIA processes of two or more countries with different levels of governance quality. In this research, the effectiveness of the EIA process in addressing development-induced disasters is evaluated by comparing the EIA processes of Sri Lanka and New Zealand. These two countries have quite different governance quality ratings and, therefore, offer a test of the influence of governance characteristics on EIA processes in addressing disaster risks. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the EIA processes of the above countries, a set of evaluation criteria was identified, mostly from existing literature. Eight criteria were specifically developed for this research. Data for the research were collected from in-depth interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire and focus group discussions with interviewees selected on the basis of their role, knowledge and expertise of the EIA process. Documents from both state and non-state actors relevant to the EIA process were also analyzed. Several recently conducted development projects in each country were used as cases to understand how the legislation is used in practice. It is clear that explicit reference to disaster risk is absent in environmental management policies in both Sri Lanka and New Zealand. Even though the New Zealand EIA process has a higher procedural and contextual effectiveness than Sri Lanka, both countries have lower levels of substantive effectiveness. Neither of the two EIA processes is found to be effective in addressing disaster risk because of inadequate policy integration of disaster risk into the environmental legislation that governs the EIA process. The results suggest more specificity is needed in legislative provisions and suggest a review of standard practice in using EIA to address disaster risk. The findings also imply the need to undertake evaluations of EIA systems elsewhere to assess their effectiveness in addressing development-induced disaster risks.

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