126 results for Unclassified, 2000

  • Hikaru Yamashita, Humanitarian Space and International Politics: The Creation of Safe Areas (Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Publishing, 2004)

    Moses, Jeremy (2008)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Book review

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  • Richard Caplan, International Governance of War-Torn Territories: Rule and Reconstruction (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006),291 pp.

    Moses, J. (2008)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    With the limited acceptance of the ‘responsibility to protect’ at the 2005 UN World Summit, it appears that the exercise of humanitarian intervention – and the related peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations that follow – will remain a feature of international politics for the forseeable future. With this in mind, Richard Caplan’s well organised analysis of the successes and failures of recent post-conflict ‘transitional administrations’ – in Eastern Slavonia, Bosnia, Kosovo, and East Timor – that have been managed by international authorities is a useful text for practitioners and scholars alike.

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  • Walter Laqueur (ed.), Voices of Terror: Manifestos, Writings, and Manuals of Al Qaeda, Hamas, and Other Terrorists from Around the World and Throughout the Ages (New York: Reed Press, 2004), 520 pp.

    Moses, J. (2006)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Patman, R. and Rudd, S. (eds.), Sovereignty Under Siege? Globalization and New Zealand, (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2005, pp. 234).

    Moses, J. (2007)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    This edited collection is an ambitious but ultimately unsatisfying attempt to examine the impact of globalisation upon the sovereignty of New Zealand. The volume begins with a basic introduction to the issues of sovereignty and globalisation and lays out the rationale for focusing on New Zealand in this context, with the argument that ‘New Zealand’s response to globalization should shed some light on both the intensity and extent of global integration’ and that the ‘New Zealand case study also promises to illuminate the role of the small state in the new global context.’ To these ends, the collection is presented in three parts, the first dealing with ‘Political and Economic Engagement,’ the second with ‘National Identity,’ and the third with ‘Security and Foreign Policy Directions.’

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  • Does negative advertising work?

    Kolovos, Ioannis; Harris, Phil (2005-11)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    In an overview of the use of negative advertising through the years, Kaid (1999) notes a real increase in the number of negative advertisements used in presidential campaigns. From 1952 to 1996, such ads made up about 38% of the whole campaign, but during the 1992 and 1996 campaigns, they made up more than half of the total advertising content. Moreover, Kaid (1999) notes that Bill Clinton’s campaigns in 1992 and 1996 reached all time highs in the use of negative ads with 69% and 68% respectively. But does negative advertising work?

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  • The roof maintenance problem — a fuzzy expert system

    Moyle, Sam A; Watts, Mike (2001)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Roof maintenance is an issue that has ongoing ramifications for property owners, all over the world. Determining accurately what maintenance should be taken is difficult, with often-conflicting evidence further complicating the task. A system has been developed for use by Roof Maintenance Experts. The expert can input information about the condition of the roof then a Fuzzy Neural Network makes an assessment, returning probable roof maintenance options. This is a non-trivial problem from the realworld domain. Often, many combinations of possible maintenance can occur and, as individual parameters change, so does the prime (or most important) option. A fuzzy neural network system was developed for assessment, running on a handheld device that could be taken into the field by a roof maintenance expert.

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  • MatLab/database connectivity

    Moyle, Sam A (2003-03)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    This experiment was run following a visit to the University of Queensland, where a simulation engine has been created using MatLab SimuLink. This simulator is developed for use as the underlying engine in future User Interface (UI) experiments. The simulator engine currently gets/puts information via a DDL link to an MS Excel spreadsheet. While this is suitable for initial testing, when UI experiments are run the data transfer method will need to be faster. There is a need for more data to be collected in order to accurately assess system state at any time during the experiment. There are two methods currently proposed to achieve this latter goal. One is to send a record to the database when the state of some component changes. The other is to capture the entire system state at pre-determined times then save the entire system state. The former method is expected to have less impact on resources, but prevents making temporal comparisons (unless you wish to replay the entire experiment). If possible, the latter method is preferred. It was recognised that some bottlenecks exist under the current system design. Notably, the simulation engine requires significant processor power to run effectively and that the resources required by MS Excel slow processes. The experiment has the following goals: Is a single, large, transaction more efficient than multiple smaller transactions? Does machine speed/specifications have an effect on how the experiment runs? Does the ODBC processing overhead have an adverse impact on data transfer speed? Does network connectivity speed have an impact on data transfer speed? Does the number of fields being transferred have an impact on data transfer speed? By identifying what combination is most effective we can then determine an optimal hardware setting for future UI experiments. This experiment is comparative in nature. It is not fully robust due to limitations in tool availability. However, the comparisons made may be useful in eliminating some of the possibilities and guiding further experiments. Three hardware setups were used. Two computers are similar in specification, but with different network connection speeds. The third was a much lower specified, but served to provide a comparative role – how much difference does improved machine specification make?

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  • Fuzzy neural networks (FuNN) in the Palm environment

    Moyle, Sam A; Watts, Mike (2002-08)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    This document is prepared with two purposes in mind. The first is to introduce the roof maintenance problem and the proposed solutions. The second is to describe its implementation for the Palm platform. The first section comprises a fairly comprehensive description of the roof maintenance problem and expected outcomes, as described by a roof maintenance expert. The purpose is not to train any individual to be come a roof maintenance expert, rather to demonstrate that the decision made by such an expert can be broken down into realistic components and subsequently acted upon. Because they can be broken down, it is possible to replicate and create an expert system able to make decision (at least in part) based on the values immediately available. The second section concentrates on actual implementation. Firstly a prototype using desktop resources is described, then the re-development for Palm devices. Within this section, the decision process and steps taken are described – which will hopefully prevent others making some of the errors made in getting this far. Section 3 describes the outcomes and directions that may be taken in the future. There are many things that can be done to improve interface design and make things easier for the end user– the roof maintenance expert.

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  • Voter apathy in British elections: causes and remedies

    Kolovos, Ioannis; Harris, Phil (2005-11)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    The turnout for the 2001 General election in Britain was the lowest ever after full adult suffrage. This essay presents the theoretical explanations of voter apathy and then reviews the literature on the causes behind the increasing voter abstention in General elections in Britain. Finally, the measures which have been proposed in order to increase voter participation are presented and critically assessed.

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  • The Marketing course at Otago 1966-1990: A case study in curriculum technology, University fashions and politics

    Mueller-Heumann, Guenther (2007)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    This paper is a case study of the development of the Marketing Management course at the University of Otago over 25 years. Key development phases and turning points in the history of the curriculum are presented and discussed. In 1966 the first Marketing Management paper at the University of Otago was taught by the then Professor of Accounting. In 1990, the Department of Marketing offered a programme which took up half of the course work for the B.Com. in Marketing Management. It had a very large number of undergraduate and postgraduate students and its staffing establishment included two chairs and more than 35 staff, some of them part-time. In such an enormous operation, academic leadership and staffing problems arise which are quite different from those of most of the small Marketing groups and departments typical for Australasian tertiary institutions.

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  • Marketing the mayor: political marketing and the Livingstone4London mayoral election campaign

    Harris, Phil; Ward, Matthew (2000)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Political marketing is commonly regarded as synonymous with the use of persuasive techniques in campaigns to promote both politicians and their policies. The borrowing of professional communication tools, such as advertising and public relations is believed to epitomise the concept of political marketing, as underlined by Kavanagh (1994:8) in his observation, `…parties are like businesses seeking to promote their products: one seeks votes, the other sales`. However, Maarek (1992) suggests that political marketing is a broader concept. Maarek (1992:28) emphasises that political marketing includes evaluation and re-design of policy and electoral strategy in the light of studies of the electorate’s concerns, underlined in his assertion; Political communication no longer means merely designing and printing a message on posters without consideration of whom they are addressed to. It encompasses the entire marketing process, from preliminary market study to testing and targeting. Concentrating on the Livingstone4London mayoral election campaign, this essay will apply the political marketing and public relations literature to features of the campaign. The three sections of the essay will follow the evolutionary models of political marketing outlined by Wring (1996) and other commentators. The first section of the essay will discuss the propaganda model of political communications, applying the concept to the most overt tools used by the Livingstone4London campaign. The second section of the essay will investigate behind the overt marketing tools of the campaign logo in purple colours and matching purple double-decker campaign bus to discuss the features of the campaign relevant to the `…”sales-led”…` model. The third section will analyse the political marketing concept, investigating the changes in policy and electoral strategy of the campaign. The essay will conclude that the Livingstone4London campaign’s wider appreciation of the political marketing concept contributed to its success.

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  • Political marketing and political communication: the relationship revisited

    Kolovos, Ioannis; Harris, Phil (2005-11)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Harrop (1990) perceives political marketing as being not just about political advertising, party political broadcasts and electoral speeches but covering the whole area of party positioning in the electoral market. Kavanagh (1995, 1996) sees political marketing as electioneering, i.e. as a set of strategies and tools to trace and study public opinion before and during an election campaign, to develop campaign communications and to assess their impact. A similar view is expressed by Scammell (1995).

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  • A comparison of software effort prediction models using small datasets

    van Koten, Chikako (2007-05)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Submitted to IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering. If published, this version will be replaced by the final version.

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  • Whakawhanaungatanga: Partnerships in bicultural development in early childhood care and education

    Ritchie, Jenny; Rau, Cheryl (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Te Puawaitanga: Partnerships with tamariki and whānau in bicultural early childhood care and education

    Ritchie, Jenny; Rau, Cheryl (2006)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Learning to teach: Success case studies of teacher induction in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Aitken, Helen; Bruce Ferguson, Pip; McGrath, Fiona; Piggot-Irvine, Eileen; Ritchie, Jenny (2008-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • An investigation into the success of in-clinic animal behaviour therapy

    Dale, Arnja (2009-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • London Town

    Braunias, Mark (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Home science graduates : Carnegie and beyond

    Collins, Jenny (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Clay economies: travels to muddied provinces

    Fahey, Richard (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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