64 results for Unclassified, Massey Research Online

  • 3rd Aviation Education and Research Symposium: “Contemporary Issues in Aviation Education and Research”

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Massey University School of Aviation is pleased to announce the third Aviation Education and Research Symposium to be held at Wellington on 05-06 July 2010, in conjunction with the Aviation Industry Association of New Zealand and Royal Aeronautical Society, New Zealand. Encouraged by the success of the previous two seminars, we have continued with sessions that enable both academics and practitioners from the aviation industry to share views and developments. The event will be a venue for disseminating research, and an opportunity for theory and practice to converge. We have retained the same theme "Contemporary Issues in Aviation Education and Research", as this appears to attract a greater spectrum of submissions across aviation psychology, education, technology, training, and the economic aspects of the industry. The conference papers have been peer-reviewed and classified into three sessions, with ‘Aviation Training’ on the first day, followed by ‘Aviation Psychology’, ‘Aviation Education’ and ‘Commercial Aspects of Aviation’ on the following day. We welcome delegates to attend, participate and share information on the latest developments in the industry.

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  • Social work students on placement: Opportunities and survival strategies

    Hay, KS

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    false

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  • Foreword

    Hunter, Jeffrey J.; Styan, George P.H.

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    N/A

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  • Five drivers

    Egbelakin, TEMITOPE; Wilkinson, S

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    THE CANTERBURY EARTHQUAKES Royal Commission reported that the magnitude of building collapses from the earthquakes is evidence that owners of earthquake-prone buildings are not adopting appropriate risk-mitigation measures in their buildings. Cost, risk perception and the effectiveness of mitigation measures have been identified as factors influencing property owners’ seismic retrofit decisions.

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  • Ki te Ao Marama, Ki te Ao Matauranga: Into the world of light, into the world of information

    Lilley, Spencer C; Field, Sheeanda

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Paper presented at Inform, Connect, Engage: Library and Information Association of New Zealand Aotearoa 2005 Conference, 11-14 September 2005, Christchurch, New Zealand

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  • Young people facing housing deprivation in Palmerston North: a crisis?

    Douglas, Olivia; Viles, Amy

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    If you are a young person tonight, or any other night, living in Palmerston North, you will need to hope that you have somewhere to sleep, as currently the city provides no safe and secure emergency housing for young people. If, for a range of reasons, a young person is not able to, or chooses not to stay with their immediate or extended family, the social services in the city are forced to ask that young person to consider sleeping on friends’ couches or to seek other equally inadequate housing options in the absence of a service that could meet their housing needs.[From Executive Summary]

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  • Barriers to the use of digital information by university researchers

    White, Bruce; Gendall, Rae

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    The transition of academic libraries from print to electronic resources is well underway and for most scholars non-engagement with the digital environment has ceased to be an option. The demands placed on the computing skills and understanding of the main features of this environment are considerable, however, and a significant proportion of researchers either fail to take advantage of it or are in fact impeded in their work by their minimal skill sets. We examine the barriers to use of the technology and describe our own experience in training university academics to become more fluent users of electronic information resources. A higher level of engagement by both library and computing staff in training and advocacy is suggested.

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  • Palmerston North Legal Entities Project: A feasibility study completed by Katheryn Margaret Pascoe as part of a 3rd year Bachelor of Social Work placement at the Palmerston North City Council.

    Pascoe, Katheryn Margaret

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    The Legal Entities Project was completed as part of a 12 week Bachelor of Social Work 3rd year placement through the collaboration of Massey University and the Palmerston North City Council Community Services team. The project was focused on exploring what the legal needs of local Incorporated Societies and Charitable Trusts providing social services in Palmerston North are, to then recommend a service to meet the needs of the sector. [First paragraph of Executive Summary]

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  • Flaunting it on Facebook: Young adults, drinking cultures and the cult of celebrity

    Lyons, Antonia; McCreanor, Tim; Hutton, Fiona; Goodwin, Ian; Barnes, Helen Moewaka; Griffin, Christine; Kerryellen, Vroman; O’Carroll, Acushla Dee; Niland, Patricia; Samu, Lina

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Copyright © Antonia Lyons; Tim McCreanor; Fiona Hutton; Ian Goodwin; Helen Moewaka Barnes; Christine Griffin; Kerryellen Vroman; Acushla Dee O’Carroll; Patricia Niland; Lina Samu Print publication available from: http://www.drinkingcultures.info/

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  • Good practice in international placements: Ideas for students and tertiary staff

    Hay, KS; Lowe, S

    Unclassified
    Massey University

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  • Editorial - Refereed Proceedings of Doing Psychology: Manawatū Doctoral Research Symposium 2012

    Rogerson, Ann; Denne, Stephanie

    Unclassified
    Massey University

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  • Aviation Education and Research Conference proceedings "Contemporary Issues in Aviation Education and Research"

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    ‘Contemporary issues in aviation education and research’ is the theme for the inaugural Aviation Education and Research Conference to be held in Blenheim on the 29-30 July as part of the New Zealand Aviation Conference week. The conference is being organised by the Massey University School of Aviation in conjunction with the Aviation Industry Association of New Zealand. “This event is intended as a forum for disseminating research and discussing current issues in aviation, with an emphasis on bridging theory and practice,” says Mr Ashok Poduval, General Manager of the Massey University School of Aviation, “It will also present an opportunity for ‘a meeting of the minds’ for academics and practitioners in the aviation industry.” The two day conference has generated a lot of interest within New Zealand as well as in Australia and the wider international academic community, with many attendees and presenters crossing the Tasman to be part of this event. “We are very pleased with the response,” adds Dr Robert Yaansah, Postgraduate Programmes and Research Coordinator of Massey School of Aviation. “A wide range of papers have been received from academics, representing a good cross section of universities within the Australasia region. Additionally, a number of our PhD Aviation students are presenting papers related to their research. This conference should establish that the region has an academic community with a strong focus on aviation education and research, as good as elsewhere in the world.”

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  • The three INGs: Recruiting, training and retaining

    Lilley, Spencer C

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Paper presented at the Library and Information Association of New Zealand Aotearoa 2000 Conference 15 –18 October 2000, Christchurch.

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  • Indigenous intellectual and cultural property rights

    Lilley, Spencer C

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Paper presented at the 8th Asia-Pacific Specials, Health and Law Librarians Conference 22-26 August 1999 Hobart, Tasmania

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  • Samoa technical report - Review of volcanic hazard maps for Savai'i and Upolu

    Cronin, Shane J.; Bonte-Grapentin, Michael; Nemeth, Karoly

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Both main islands of Samoa, Savai'i and Upolu need to be considered as potentially volcanically active. The most recent eruptions in historic times happened on Savai'i in 1905-1911, 1902 and 1760 (estimated). Though detailed volcanic studies and dating of volcanic events are very limited there is evidence for repeated volcanic activity on both islands since the time of human occupation of the islands marked by prominent and fresh appearance of tuff cones as Tafua (= fire mountain) Savai'i, the island of Apolima, Tafua Upolu and offshore Cape Tapaga. This report examines the volcanic risks for both islands and defines for disaster management considerations potential eruption scenarios based on eyewitness accounts of previous eruptions, geological field evidence, remote sensing information and experiences from similar volcanoes. A detailed timeline of events, potential impacts and required emergency response activities are listed for the five potential eruption types (1) long-term lava field (2) short-term spatter-cone (3) explosive phreatomagmatic (4) explosive scoria-cone and (5) submarine flank collapse. Given the nature of volcanism in Samoa with hundreds of individual "one-off" volcanoes scattered along zones of structural weakness within the Savai'i - Upolu Platform - predicting the exact location of future eruption centres is impossible. At the current stage of knowledge a presentation of a volcanic hazard map is inadequate and would require additional baseline studies to statistically define recurrence intervals and areas of higher volcanic activity. Taking these limitations into account, maps showing the relative potential for new eruption vents on Upolu and Savai'i are derived from geomorphologic features. To improve our understanding and management of the volcanic risks of Samoa, suggestions for achievable future work are listed and prioritised. These recommendations include geological/volcanological baseline studies (e.g. dating/detailed analyses of past events, rock chemistry, volcano structure); installation of early warning and monitoring network (e.g. permanent GPS, seismometers); and disaster preparedness and volcanic crisis response planning.

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  • Achieving quality teaching in developing countries : identifying factors that influence the delivery of quality teaching in primary schools in rural Cambodia : a research project presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development, Institute of Development Studies, Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Arnold, Denise Joy

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    At a global level the Education for All focus has shifted from years of schooling to the quality of education being attained. The delivery of quality education is dependent upon quality teaching. While there is no clear definition of quality teaching there are recognised characteristics which lend themselves to quality teaching and therefore are used as proxies to identify what constitutes a quality teacher. Of importance to this study is the fact these same recognised characteristics of what constitutes quality teaching and a quality teacher are reflected in the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sport in Cambodia (MoEYS) goals and teachers in Cambodia clearly identify with these characteristics. Drawing on a case study of Cambodia this research examines the influences that work upon a teacher to either positively influence the delivery of quality teaching or to negatively influence the same. While influences which positively and negatively impact quality teaching are wide ranging, some are definitely more influential than others. Hence there is a clear recognition of the importance of the provision of basic resources for education. The delivery of quality teaching requires basic physical infrastructure and resources such as teacher training, adequate teacher salaries and teaching materials. Without these basic resources a teacher is destined to fail in the delivery of quality teaching. This is particularly relevant in a developing country where the teachers are more likely to be working at a pre-professional level in terms of teaching skills, dependent upon teaching materials and reliant on basic classroom management skills. This is the case in Cambodia. Before any other influences become significant these fundamental needs must be met. There is also an important link between the health of both teachers and children and the delivery of quality teaching. Basic health needs must be met if the delivery of quality teaching is not to be undermined.

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  • Forced assimilation and development : the Chinese-Indonesians under Soeharto's New Order (1965-1998) : a research project presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development, Development Studies, Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Sidjaya, Calvin Michel

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Chinese Indonesians are an ethnic minority who have settled in Indonesia since at least the 15th century who comprise 1.2% of the Indonesian population. From 1965-1998, Chinese-Indonesians became subject to various assimilationist laws under the rationale that this ethnic minority had failed to integrate into Indonesian society. Under Soeharto’s administration, Chinese-Indonesians had to give up their political and cultural rights, although they were allowed to participate widely in the economic sector. This desk-based research studied assimilationist laws and their impact on the ‘development’ of Chinese-Indonesians by studying various laws and through the use of an online questionnaire to a sample of Chinese-Indonesians. At first glance, this ethnic group can be classified as ‘developed’ at least economically, however when investigated further, systemic political and cultural exclusion has harmed their full human development. The case of Chinese-Indonesians reflects Amartya Sen’s argument in ‘Development as Freedom (1999), that wealth is only one aspect of human development. However care should be taken when considering the Chinese-Indonesian case. Generalisations should not be made about the harms that can result from assimilation policies as they were formulated during the Cold War. Assimilation is still important but should not be coercive and ensure multiple identities (such as ethnic and national identity) can coexist. This research report also uses right to development as framework. It concludes that the right to development may not be inclusive to Chinese-Indonesians’ situations because it still narrow down development as ‘growth’.

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  • The evolution of benefit sharing agreements in Papua New Guinea : what are the lessons learnt and what are the prospects for the future? : a research presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development in Development Studies at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Anoser, Killian Saulmai

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    With an abundance of natural resources, the extractive and fishery exploitation at a developed stage, Papua New Guinea (PNG) should have been at the top end of the developing world, however, this has not materialised. PNG is going through the dilemmas of development through high rate of resource exploitation and unequal distribution of benefits that is having detrimental effect on the economy and general living standard. Many have questioned why this situation has existed without being addressed. It is also acknowledged here that there has been much literature that has been written on the environment and social impacts of resource project, however, there has been little written on the benefits flowing through to those people affected by resource developments. This report attempts to address those benefit sharing issues. A review of past and current projects and how they distributed benefits has provided a baseline from which the most important elements for future benefit sharing have been identified. These are that BSA are negotiated, legally binding agreements that recognise property rights, are internationally recognised, they allocate and demarcate responsibilities and ensure development coherence. Using these characteristics, a fair and equitable benefit sharing could then be developed for resource projects in Papua New Guinea.

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  • Indigenous rights and development : inequality constraints in Brazilian cities : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of Master of International Development at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Souza Zaiden, Soraya

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    This thesis aims at identifying how indigenous rights, as part of a human rights approach to development, have been addressed by urban welfare policies in Brazil. As a starting point, this desk based study is primarily focused on an analysis of the impacts of urbanisation on indigenous livelihoods. Despite not being a new trend, urbanisation of indigenous people has exposed their situation of deprivation and disadvantage, and the increasing pressures of assimilation policies. Social indicators of urban indigenous communities’ wellbeing have pointed to a growing gap between indigenous and non-indigenous population. The access to distinct basic welfare provision is not only determinant in reducing disparities but would also represent the compliance of a state with the indigenous rights framework. This thesis investigates if and how the Brazilian social agenda is in compliance with and indigenous rights framework. The Brazilian government acknowledged Brazil as multi-ethnic, which is reflected in the domestic legal framework, and also in the ratification of international covenants and declarations related to indigenous rights. However, the need of the urban indigenous population for differentiated service provisions has represented a challenging matter in policy making. The existence of an implementation gap between the indigenous rights framework and their effective application is a relevant theme for analysis and evaluation, in order to identify the factors that are hindering state compliance with the standards that have already been legislated. To this regard, the experience of urban indigenous communities in Brazil is explored in two case studies, related to the Pankararu, in Sao Paulo, and the Terena, in Campo Grande. The outcomes of the mainstream welfare policies are also investigated through the lens of urban indigenous communities. Ultimately this thesis unveils the potential of the Brazilian state, as the duty-bearer of indigenous rights, as capable and responsible to unleash the realisation of indigenous expectations to overcome powerlessness, economic underdevelopment and cultural disruptions.

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  • 1917: 90 years On - Masterpiece to Massacre: the New Zealand Division and three battles

    Harper, Glyn

    Unclassified
    Massey University

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