167 results for Unclassified, Unitec Research Bank

  • Systems dynamics modelling of pathways to a hydrogen economy in New Zealand : final report

    Leaver, Jonathan; Gillingham, Kenneth; Baglino, A. (2012-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This report represents a compilation of work prepared under Objective 6: Carbon to Hydrogen Energy – Proof of Concept of FRST contract C08X0204.

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  • Akoaga : efficacy, agency, achievement and success in the tertiary sector : focus on students and parents from Pasifika communities

    Marat, Deepa; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Latu, Savae; Aumua, Linda; Talakai, Malia; Sun, Kang (2011-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The term akoaga has a pan-Polynesian origin and meaning. In the Samoan language, the term can be broken into two root words, ako and aga. Ako or ato means basket and aga means measurements associated with weaving.

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  • Communicating social change : politics and immigrants

    Cruickshank, Prue (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Immigration is a complex, dynamic global phenomenon which impacts irrevocably on both immigrants and the receiving society. Immigration policies, reflecting governments’ political and economic intentions, significantly influence successful immigration and settlement. Immigrants’ success in meeting governments’ and their own expectations are influenced by the political, economic, regulatory and social conditions of the host society they enter. Developing communication strategies to prepare a population for a change in immigration policies would be advantageous for social cohesion. However, the introduction of radical economic change intended to restructure business and society at the same time was not conducive to smooth, social immigrant integration. This paper explores the communication dimensions of an immigration policy set within the context of national political and economic restructuring. It does this by tracing the process and impact of the introduction of neo-liberal policies on New Zealand society without prior political debate. The economic and social consequences of neo-liberal reforms affected the reception and opportunities encountered by newly arrived business immigrants. To contextualise the discussion, the effects of neo-liberal policies on the New Zealand economy and society, including its immigrant communities, are traced from their inception in the 1980s through the 1990s. Introducing an economic and political change process which enables people to connect and participate, requires leaders who can articulate a vision to persuade people it is in their best interests to incorporate the change (Shockly-Zalabak, 2009). An opportunity for political debate on the impending neo-liberal changes arose during the 1994 New Zealand election campaign but was deliberately ignored (Jesson, 1999). An unexplained change in the social contract potentially creates a sense of betrayal and unfocused anger (D’Aprix, 1996). Subsequently, as the neo-liberal structural reforms were introduced, communities reacted in confusion, anger and scepticism.

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  • Introduction : representation and voice in a complex communication environment

    Dodson, Giles; Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Representation is, of course, a central analytical concept with media, communication and cultural inquiry. The centrality of representation – of expression, mediation, institutional form and cultural negotiation - to issues of public debate and engagement, the quality of our media and to the measure of human agency and of our institutions is a notion that grounds our research and inquiry at Unitec. Representation is a central foundation of our research strategy and a central theme of this collection. A parallel interest and sensitivity to the place of voice within contemporary communicative practices provides a second foundational concept for our research activities. With an interest in voice we are focusing our attention on individuals, agencies and institutions and processes of ‘self’ and ‘collective’ representation that voicing implies, particularly in response to experiences or conditions of marginality (Couldry, 2010). Here, voice is understood as capacity and agency, in as much as it implies the communicative or representational act itself. Likewise, representation is an important way in which our voice can be heard. We feel strongly that how voices are intervening from the margins within contemporary New Zealand is a centrally important dynamic to be analysed and understood. We feel our Department is strongly placed to make significant contributions in this area and this collection stakes this claim.

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  • Preface. In Communication issues in Aotearoa New Zealand: a collection of research essays.

    Bossio, Diana (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The aim of this collection is to showcase Unitec’s Department of Communication engagement with contemporary communications issues and this collection presents a rich and diverse response. From questions of race, multiculturalism and cultural politics, to case studies discussing questions of digital accessibility, governance and organisational communications, the research highlights a specifically New Zealand context, but is applicable to global understandings of communications.

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  • Race, racism in everyday communication in Aotearoa / New Zealand

    Revell, Elisabeth; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Kolesova, Elena (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This essay is based on theories of ‘new racism’, which explain how race and racism continue to play an integral role in our lives, but in subtle and often hidden ways. This approach informs the discussion in this essay that focuses on some of the issues that emerged from a critical collaborative autoethnographic project that explored how race is manifested in everyday communication interactions in New Zealand. The discussion, more specifically, draws on what we call here ‘conversational tact’ and its three sub-themes of ‘everyday racialised ethnic terms’, ‘the everyday racialised use of ethnic stereotypes’, and ‘everyday censorship and silence around race in conversation’. These themes have been chosen as the focus of this essay because they sit together under a larger theme that looks at the way in which people communicate race through their everyday patterns of speech and vocabulary in New Zealand and help us unmask ‘racial micro aggressions’ (DeAngelis, 2009; Sue et al, 2007).

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  • “Cool” Asia in a local context : East Asian popular culture in a New Zealand classroom

    Kolesova, Elena (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The central issue is not only what can every discipline learn from popular culture, but also how can popular culture become a successful tool of learning for different disciplines. The fact that it is such an attractive tool of learning for students does not make it easier to answer the question of what we, as teachers of popular culture, want our students to learn and understand when we use this powerful tool in our classroom. The course East Meets West was introduced in 2003 as a part of a suite of ‘global electives’ for all students enrolled in degree level programmes, e.g. Marketing, Business Management, Sports Management, Communication Studies etc at Unitec Institute of Technology, New Zealand. However, the majority taking the course were Bachelor of Arts [BA] students majoring in Japanese, Chinese or European languages. Some students were choosing to study Asian languages and, first of all, Japanese language to satisfy their obsession with East Asian popular culture. Japanese popular culture certainly played a key role, but interest in popular culture from other East Asian countries was equally present. Since 2010 the majority of students enrolled in this course were students enrolled in Communication Studies. Similarly to the BA students, their interest in this course was equally determined by their previous engagement with East Asian popular culture. The aim of the course has been to explore the influence of East Asian popular culture on the Western popular culture. The main emphasis was on visual popular culture, e.g. anime, film, advertising or street fashion. However, other genres or types of popular culture were also considered.

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  • The migrant and the media : maintaining cultural identity through ethnic media

    Noronha, Sandra; Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Evidence shows that mainstream media in New Zealand does not fully address the communication needs of these ethnic groups nor does it represent them in a balanced way (Robie, 2009). This is where ethnic, migrant, diaspora media play an important and supporting role by providing an alternative to an increasingly homogenised mainstream media. For ethnic communities, access to such media gives them an avenue to understand more clearly issues affecting their community, a stronger sense of identity and social cohesion and a connection to a perceived transnational community. While there is an increasing concern that mainstream media fails to reflect migrant issues and concerns, a plethora of migrant media exists in parallel that helps fill this gap (Williamson and DeSouza, 2006). Auckland alone has a vibrant ethnic media scene with media spread across print, radio, and web. Its strong Pacific Islands population, for instance, has created a lively media scene with a strong radio and online media presence contributing to the creation of a distinctive cultural diasporic identity (Papoutsaki and Strickland, 2008). With this background, this essay explores the function of different migrant media in New Zealand drawing examples from across the board with a particular focus on Indian media. This includes traditional media (i.e. print, TV, magazine, and radio), and online media. In this, the traditional communication networks of ethnic community and religious associations and their use of web, films and events is also taken into consideration. By exploring the role, challenges and potential of ethnic media, this essay seeks to understand how these media represent the diverse voices of migrant groups, in addition to providing content relevant to their needs as migrants (i.e. content that counterbalances the mainstream host culture as it is represented in the mainstream media).

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  • Communication issues in Aotearoa New Zealand : a collection of research essays

    Dodson, Giles; Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This edited volume introduces highlights of the academic interests and research activities of a number of staff at Unitec’s Department of Communication Studies, demonstrating the breadth and scope of the engagement of this academic collective with contemporary communication issues. Edited by Giles Dodson and Evangelia Papoutsaki, it is clear from the work that communication in Aotearoa New Zealand remains complex and continually under negotiation, as this country continues to be formed and reformed by processes of cultural encounter, by political and institutional change and by voices seeking to assert, to contest and to claim their presence – to represent and to be represented within contemporary New Zealand.

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  • Moving forward, keeping the past in front of us : Treaty settlements, conservation co-governance and communication.

    Dodson, Giles (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    At present there is well-established recognition in New Zealand of Māori and the Crown as constitutional partners to the Treaty of Waitangi1 and commitment to partnership is widely articulated in official and public discourses. This essay addresses the current issue of how developments in Treaty policy and new institutions arising from settlement of Treaty of Waitangi claims can inform the development of institutions of co-governance within national conservation policy. This discussion is contexualised by an examination of currently evolving marine conservation policy. The essay argues that communication, as a discipline conventionally outside policy – especially science dominated conservation policy – has much to offer policymakers as we seek to understand best practice partnership and co-governance arrangements emerging from Treaty settlements.

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  • Public relations in New Zealand - the missing pieces

    Trenwith, Lynne (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Modern practitioners of public relations in New Zealand work in diverse areas of communication (PRINZ, 2006, 2011) but the different areas of practice and the skills that each area employs have developed from the early years of public relations activity; from its origins in the two separate yet related strands of tikanga Māori and press agentry. The press agentry strand has been documented by Trenwith (2010) as the occupation emerged from its war time press agentry and propaganda practices to that of the more modern public relations practices. But missing from the New Zealand public relations history discourse is representation that addresses and integrates Māori and Pacific Island public relations ontological and epistemological assumptions.

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  • Repositioning the oral history interview : reciprocal peer interviewing within a transgenerational frame

    Donaghey, Sara (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This essay signals a departure from conventional models for the oral history interview to allow the participant voices to occupy a position of greater prominence in a collaborative process of co-creation. Reciprocal peer interviewing is an adaptation of focus group interviews; a technique that positions the narrators at the forefront of the interview process whilst the researcher takes on a secondary role as facilitator and observer. My research applies the reciprocal peer interview technique to explorations of lesbian identity and life experiences through oral testimony within a transgenerational frame. The interview lies at the heart of oral history; an intensely personal activity that provides recorded information in oral form (Fyfe and Manson, 2006). Indeed, analogies to dramatic representations are common in the literature, describing the interview as a performance during which two people interact across multiple channels of reception and transmission. Traditional interview modes place the researcher/interviewer at the forefront, engaging in an interrogatory dialogue with the narrator/interviewee. Despite an uneasy relationship with historians who at times, have viewed oral history as populist, partial and selective, one may argue that the recording of a life story is no different to an interview used as a mainstream data collection instrument in qualitative research commonly applied in the social sciences. Ultimately, one must adhere to the raison d’etre for historical study as stated by Thompson (1978, p 21) that “all history depends ultimately upon its social purpose.”

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  • New Zealand online : what’s happened to our Digital Strategy?

    Williams, Jocelyn (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The world started to talk about a “digital divide” in the mid-1990s. Governments had to grapple with its meaning and anticipate its ramifications (Maharey and Swain, 2000), although the swiftness with which the world was entering a new internet era from 1995 meant it was difficult to keep ahead with coherent strategy. Much has been achieved in regard to internet access in New Zealand since 2000. One reason is that we have a track record of relatively rapid adoption of electronic technologies (Doolin et al, 2005), and as predicted in diffusion of innovations theory (Rogers, 2003) greater penetration of the New Zealand market has been achieved for technological innovations such as smart phones. Large-scale household surveys show a gradual closing of the information and communication technologies [ICTs] access gap (Statistics New Zealand, 2009; Bascand, 2013). Yet it may surprise some people to know that digital inclusion remains an issue in New Zealand society, especially where school-aged children in poorer communities are concerned (Statistics New Zealand, 2006a). Although New Zealand is a developed nation that by many measures appears to enjoy a good standard of living, lack of economic prosperity across the nation as a whole is driving income disparity, and the 2006-2008 global recession has led to increasingly thinly spread public sector resources. Improved economic performance is a governmental priority, and in that context digital literacy - “the new forms of literacy required from the incorporation of digital technology in the structures, flows and embodied experiences of everyday life” (Goggin, 2008, p. 88) - is vital so that people can contribute to the economy. However, one fifth of New Zealand households, especially those in low socio-economic areas, remain without internet access at the time of writing (Bascand, 2013). This is a matter of concern in terms of the need to include as many skilled people in the workforce as possible, and to stimulate the economy through high-tech innovation so that it is less dependent on primary production and tourism, and more on “weightless exports” (The Committee for Auckland, 2012, p. 7). Currently “staggering talent gaps” (ibid) are being identified as cause for concern, especially a growing shortfall of IT skills that are needed to assist business to be more productive, flexible and profitable (ibid, p. 12-13). This essay traces the evolution of a digital strategy in New Zealand, explores reasons why a digital divide persists in spite of it, and invites the reader to consider the importance of the social context for ICTs, and social interaction that facilitates learning, at least as much as the technologies themselves.

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  • All the suffering on our backs : rugby, religion and redemption amid the ruins

    Cass, Philip (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    New Zealand’s All Black rugby team is a national icon, an affirmation of the manly, self-reliant and resilient virtues which New Zealanders like to think they possess. In times of national peril, economic uncertainty and disaster they remain a pillar of certainty and inspiration, present in almost every television news bulletin and daily newspaper. At other times the All Blacks – whether current players or not - have also provided the media with a frame of reference for explaining significant international events to New Zealand audiences. In 2011 the All Blacks were used prominently to report on the Christchurch earthquake and the much greater seismic devastation experienced in Japan. However, as the Rugby World Cup approached both New Zealand and international media also began to invest the performance of rugby players with a quasi-religious expectation that they would somehow provide catharsis and healing for the earthquake victims in New Zealand and Japan. In doing so they reflected processes that had occurred elsewhere, notably in New Orleans after Cyclone Katrina, the 1995 Rugby World Cup in South Africa and London after the July 2007 terrorist attacks. Rugby has been described as a religion in New Zealand. It is certainly an obsession. Located on the fringes of the north Antarctic and exercising little global economic, political or military influence, New Zealand constantly seeks to mark a space for itself on the world stage through sport. Despite the success of its sportsmen and women in a variety of competitions, rugby remains the central, if not the driving force, in New Zealand sport and in its quest for global recognition. New Zealand’s national team, the All Blacks, is freighted with all sorts of social, cultural and quasi-political expectations.

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  • Theory U and team performance: presence, participation, and productivity

    Hays, Jay (2014)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This chapter applies Scharmer’s Theory U to team performance, productivity, and learning. Key topics covered include counterproductive thought patterns, or habits, and how they can be overcome; the complementary notions of collective presence and authenticity; and the critical contributions of shared reflection and dialogue to team learning and evolution. These and other elements of Scharmer’s Theory U enable extraordinary collaborative effort and confer team advantages in terms of innovation, competitiveness, and sustainability. Strategies presented for promoting team evolution help readers to see how Theory U might be put into practice in their respective organisations and communities.

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  • Time for a change / workbook one : preparing for residential treatment

    Birks Ang, Ben; Forrester, Rachel; Buglass, Andrew; Brett, Rohelle; Doswell, Kate; Noomotu, Tangi; Christie, Debbie; Koning, Ashley; Fowler, Michelle; Hampton, Jacqui (2016)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This workbook is designed to help you get ready for your residential stay, so you can get the most out of it. Over the next few pages, you’ll get a chance to think about how it might work for you, and what you need to do to get ready for your stay with us. You can work through this workbook by yourself, or with others – like a supportive friend or your drug and alcohol practitioner.

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  • Thesis review : Gender, migration and communication networks : mapping the communicative ecology of Latin American migrant women in New Zealand /Aotearoa

    Ayallo, Irene (2016-10-04)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In this thesis, the author investigates the role of communication networks in the pre-and post-migration process of Latin American women resettled in New Zealand. This well researched and skilfully written thesis begins from the premise that while the process of migration and resettlement is complex and challenging for all migrants, it is more demanding for women. Because of socially constructed biological and social differences, which usually portray women as subordinate to men, the conventional perception is that women are dependent on their husbands and less active in the migration decision and process. This view is negated in this thesis. Latin American women in this study voluntarily migrated as skilled migrants and/or for professional reasons. The author also discusses how women use formal and informal communication networks to integrate, to maintain their culture and language, and for personal development. The narratives of Latin American women migrating to New Zealand and their communication networks were, however, absent in literature and this thesis sets out to address this gap.

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  • Applied practice : theoretical and pedagogical foundations

    Hays, Jay; Helmling, Lisa (2017-04-04)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Applied Practice is an overarching term embracing a wide range of pedagogies that employ one or more forms of work experience for learning, including cooperative education (or co-op), professional practice, internships and apprenticeships, service learning, and many versions of Work-Integrated Learning (WIL). As used here, Applied Practice encompasses the theories, principles, approaches and programs that govern and inform the development of professional practices and practitioners across disciplines, and, in so doing, build individual, organisational, and community capacity to sustainably transform. As this monograph reveals, Applied Practice is a defensible means for building capabilities and dispositions demanded by the complex, global world of the twenty-first century. It achieves this by narrowing the theory–practice divide for which higher education has long been criticised. Narrowing of this gap is made possible by more fully integrating theory and practice, attained through pedagogies that mutually exploit the learning and experiences in academic study and practical work experience. Applied Practice and the various affiliated work experience for learning and Work-Integrated Learning programs are under-theorised and remain under-researched. Herein, the authors draw on a wide range of studies and scholarly literature, and attempt to bring together what can be ascertained with respect to applicable theory and pedagogy. The result of this synthesis is a four-pillar model, each of the four pillars representing a substantial theory stream and important foundation of Applied Practice: Adult Learning Theory (ALT), Experiential Learning Theory (ELT), Transformational Learning Theory (TLT), and Workplace Learning Theory (WLT).

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  • New Lynn – Auckland IMM case study : low-density urban morphology and energy performance optimisation. A new pilot project in Auckland using Integrated Modification Methodology (IMM)

    Tadi, Massimo; Bogunovich, Dushko (2017-04-04)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Integrated Modification Methodology (IMM) has already been applied in established metropolitan contexts, such as Porto Maravilha in Rio de Janeiro, the neighbourhood of Shahrak-e Golestan in Tehran, and Block 39 in New Belgrade. When Unitec Institute of Technology’s Associate Professor of Urban Design Dushko Bogunovich came up with the idea of a comparative analysis of two sprawling metropolitan contexts – Auckland and Milan – he and Massimo Tadi, Director of the IMMdesignlab in Milan and Associate Professor at the School of Architectural Engineering at the Politecnico di Milano, decided to apply IMM to a sample area of low-density suburban Auckland. The project presented in this book was developed in a joint international design workshop organised by Politecnico di Milano, IMMdesignlab and Unitec Institute of Technology. The workshop was held at Politecnico di Milano, Polo Territoriale di Lecco (Italy), from 25–29 May 2015, and the team, comprising 14 international students from different design disciplines, was coordinated by Tadi and Bogunovich, assisted by engineers Hadi Mohammad Zadeh and Frederico Zaniol (IMMdesignlab). The outcomes of the workshop were then further developed by IMMdesignlab to demonstrate how, by adopting IMM, it is possible to retrofit, renovate and reactivate an inefficient and energy consuming neighbourhood into a more integrated and sustainable one.

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  • Walter Klasz : Inbetween

    Klasz, Walter; Mitterer, Wittfrida; Michl, Thomas; Kern, Christian; McPherson, Peter (2017-03-03)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In 2016, Austrian architect and designer Walter Klasz visited Auckland as a Researcher in Residence, hosted by Unitec. Walter’s work focuses on the potential of ‘self-forming-structures’ – constructions that emerge from the tensile and compressive forces that can be manipulated by the designer and the builder. While in New Zealand he was inspired by Polynesian construction and design, by forms found in nature and the landscape, and by his contemporaries working and studying at Unitec. The culmination of his residency was an exhibition at Snowwhite gallery in Auckland, for which Klasz created an accompanying book describing his process, including iterative designs, self-reflection and discussion with friends and colleagues; an autoethnographic account of his time in Auckland. Instead of conducting a blind peer review of Klasz’s book, ePress invited four of his peers to submit an open review, presented here as a discursive foreword to the work. This introductory consideration provides a critical framework to support the manuscript while also acknowledging its place as a reflective account of Klasz’s residency. Open review by: Ass. Prof.Dr. Wittfrida Mitterer, Editor, Bio-Architettura magazine, Italy Dr. Thomas Michl, Lecturer in Art Didactics, Academy of Fine Arts, Nuremberg, Germany Univ. Prof. Arch. Christian Kern, Institute of Three-Dimensional Design, Technical University of Vienna, Austria Peter McPherson, Head of Architecture, Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand This work is a scholarly open review of ‘How far can design be reduced to let form emerge on its own? A review on the research of Architect Walter Klasz in Auckland’ – a booklet from the exhibition at Snowwhite Gallery: Inbetween art and research. Inbetween physical experiments and parametric digital control. (Copyright: Walter Klasz, proofreading: Joe Streibl, Austria) With contributions from Paul Woodruffe, MLA. Artist and Landscape Architect, Department of Design & Contemporary Art, Unitec; Renata Jadresin-Milic, Senior Lecturer, Department of Architecture, Unitec; Sandra Arnet, Academic Leader, Undergraduate, Interior Design/Architecture/Landscape Architecture, Unitec; Marcus Williams, Associate Professor, Dean of Research and Enterprise, Tūāpapa Rangahau, partnering Research and Enterprise, Unitec; Hazel Redpath, Curriculum Developer and Academic Advisor, Unitec.

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