550 results for Unclassified, All rights reserved

  • Systems dynamics modelling of pathways to a hydrogen economy in New Zealand : final report

    Leaver, Jonathan; Gillingham, Kenneth; Baglino, A. (2012-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This report represents a compilation of work prepared under Objective 6: Carbon to Hydrogen Energy – Proof of Concept of FRST contract C08X0204.

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  • Akoaga : efficacy, agency, achievement and success in the tertiary sector : focus on students and parents from Pasifika communities

    Marat, Deepa; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Latu, Savae; Aumua, Linda; Talakai, Malia; Sun, Kang (2011-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The term akoaga has a pan-Polynesian origin and meaning. In the Samoan language, the term can be broken into two root words, ako and aga. Ako or ato means basket and aga means measurements associated with weaving.

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  • Theory U and team performance: presence, participation, and productivity

    Hays, Jay (2014)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This chapter applies Scharmer’s Theory U to team performance, productivity, and learning. Key topics covered include counterproductive thought patterns, or habits, and how they can be overcome; the complementary notions of collective presence and authenticity; and the critical contributions of shared reflection and dialogue to team learning and evolution. These and other elements of Scharmer’s Theory U enable extraordinary collaborative effort and confer team advantages in terms of innovation, competitiveness, and sustainability. Strategies presented for promoting team evolution help readers to see how Theory U might be put into practice in their respective organisations and communities.

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  • Time for a change / workbook one : preparing for residential treatment

    Birks Ang, Ben; Forrester, Rachel; Buglass, Andrew; Brett, Rohelle; Doswell, Kate; Noomotu, Tangi; Christie, Debbie; Koning, Ashley; Fowler, Michelle; Hampton, Jacqui (2016)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This workbook is designed to help you get ready for your residential stay, so you can get the most out of it. Over the next few pages, you’ll get a chance to think about how it might work for you, and what you need to do to get ready for your stay with us. You can work through this workbook by yourself, or with others – like a supportive friend or your drug and alcohol practitioner.

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  • Middle managers play an essential role in executing change

    Arnaud, N.; Mills, C.E. (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    There is much talk about change and how managers must communicate during change to ensure it occurs smoothly. However, seldom does advice for managing change go beyond the language of change; the ways to explain a proposed change and persuade workers of its importance and how they can ‘get on board’. This advice rarely looks at the non-verbal tools that managers can have at their disposal to influence change. How does materiality contribute in practice to the implementation of a strategic change? And what kind of materiality can be mobilised in this process? These are the two questions we addressed in a paper recently published in the British Journal of Management entitled Materializing Strategy in Mundane Tools: the Key to Coupling Global Strategy and Local Strategy Practice?

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  • Where to next for our sinking city? Opinion piece in the Christchurch Press, 15th August 2014

    Quigley, M.C.; Hughes, M.W. (2014)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    OPINION: Associate Professor MARK QUIGLEY, from the University of Canterbury's department of geological sciences, and Dr MATTHEW HUGHES, from its department of civil and natural resources engineering, survey the changing landscape of post-quake Christchurch.

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  • Review: Bowlby 25th Annivesary Memorial conference

    Dorahy, M.J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Hikaru Yamashita, Humanitarian Space and International Politics: The Creation of Safe Areas (Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Publishing, 2004)

    Moses, Jeremy (2008)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Book review

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  • Submission to the Parliamentary Select Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade on the New Zealand Intelligence and Security Bill

    Small, D. (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Submission to Parliamentary Select Committee on Education and Science on Education Amendment Bill (No 2)

    Small, D. (2014)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The absent elephant in the 2016 : Modernising Child Youth and Family Expert Panel Report

    Kenkel, David (2016-04)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Sometimes the most interesting thing about a new policy document or report is not what is present in the document but what is absent. On receiving the report Investing in New Zealand’s Children and Their Families I used the very simple textual analysis technique of searching for the frequency of what I considered important words. Such a simple analysis does not necessarily create a window into the minds and thinking of the authors; however it does give some indications about what they consider important at least as measured by how frequently they talk about it.

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  • They are the elements in the room but only very briefly

    Hartshorn, R.M. (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Chemistry made it into the mainstream news last week, following the announcement from the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) that four new elements have been discovered. So is this a big deal and what does it really mean? Well, like many things, the answer is that it depends on who you are and what you care about. But apart from anything else, in the complete history of human activity we have (now) found only 118 elements, so discovering one, let alone four, is a rare and remarkable event.

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  • Richard Caplan, International Governance of War-Torn Territories: Rule and Reconstruction (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006),291 pp.

    Moses, J. (2008)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    With the limited acceptance of the ‘responsibility to protect’ at the 2005 UN World Summit, it appears that the exercise of humanitarian intervention – and the related peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations that follow – will remain a feature of international politics for the forseeable future. With this in mind, Richard Caplan’s well organised analysis of the successes and failures of recent post-conflict ‘transitional administrations’ – in Eastern Slavonia, Bosnia, Kosovo, and East Timor – that have been managed by international authorities is a useful text for practitioners and scholars alike.

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  • Walter Laqueur (ed.), Voices of Terror: Manifestos, Writings, and Manuals of Al Qaeda, Hamas, and Other Terrorists from Around the World and Throughout the Ages (New York: Reed Press, 2004), 520 pp.

    Moses, J. (2006)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Bibliography : Social Work Pertaining to Māori in New Zealand : Ngā Mahi Toko I Te Ora O Te Iwi Māori 1990-2017

    Gilmour KL; Holzke J (2017)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Subject Librarians for the fields of Counselling, Human Services and Social Work are often asked for help with searching for literature related to social work with Māori clients and bicultural social work practice. This bibliography is an attempt to bring together research and literature of interest to social work professionals working with Māori in New Zealand.

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  • Supporting your practice

    McChesney, J.; Wilson, S. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Transition to a low-carbon economy for New Zealand

    Sims, Ralph; Barton, Barry; Bennett, Paul; Isaacs, Nigel; Kerr, Suzi; Leaver, Jonathan; Reisinger, Andy; Stephenson, Janet (2016-04)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The problem The climate is changing. Average temperatures are increasing due to human activity, which has driven increasingly high levels of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 2015 Paris Climate Agreement adopted by 195 countries has the goal that the world will limit the increase in global temperature to well below 2 degrees Celsius (2 degrees C) above pre-industrial levels, and will pursue efforts to limit the increase to below 1.5 degrees C. Global GHG emissions continue to rise and under current trends, the world is heading towards a global 3–4 degrees C temperature rise. This will result in negative impacts on the global economy and significantly increase the risks from climate change through rising temperatures, accelerated sea level rise, changes in rainfall patterns, more frequent extreme weather events, and higher costs to adapt or protect ourselves and our infrastructure. We will need our economy to become more resilient. In order to limit temperature rise, we must reduce GHG emissions and work towards a low-carbon economy. The low-carbon economy for New Zealand, as defined in this study, is one that trends towards net zero emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), over the next few decades, while also reducing emissions of shorter-lived gases, mainly methane (CH4). Reducing CO2 is particularly important as it stays in the atmosphere for hundreds to thousands of years. Prioritising CO2 emission reductions in the near term is consistent with the authoritative assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concerning the actions needed globally to stabilise the climate and to limit warming to well below 2°C. This study provides a scientific analysis of the complex situation we find ourselves in and what we can best do about it. All New Zealanders need to understand the threats of climate change, accept that we need to change the way we act, realise there are trade-offs that will need to be made, and become personally involved in implementing mitigation solutions. Mitigation is where we take action to either reduce emissions, or support the removal of GHGs from the atmosphere. We have the potential to make the transition to a low-carbon economy within several decades by taking mitigation actions. While this will have costs, it will also bring benefits and opportunities that need to be considered. This study is a first step to enable an open debate around options, choices and time frames. There is very limited publicly available information on what we can and need to do, or the costs and policy options for their implementation now, or later, in individual sectors and across the economy. Such information is critical if we want to have a broad and inclusive debate involving all New Zealanders about how we best make the transition to a low-carbon economy, and the emissions reductions that could be achieved over time (commonly called emissions pathways). Addressing the information gaps so that we can have an informed debate is a very high priority.

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  • List of Qualitas Code Corpus Programs used for Encapsulation Research.

    Voigt, Janina; Irwin, Warwick; Churcher, Neville (2010)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Reducing beam hardening effects and metal artefacts in spectral CT using Medipix3RX

    Rajendran, K; Walsh, M. F.; de Ruiter, N. J. A.; Chernoglazov, A. I.; Panta, R. K.; Butler, P. H.; Bell, S. T.; Woodfield, T. B. F.; Tredinnick, J.; Healy, J. L.; Bateman, C. J.; Aamir, R.; Doesburg, R. M. N.; Renaud, P. F.; Gieseg, S. P.; Smithies, D. J.; Mohr, J. L.; Mandalika, V. B. H.; Opie, A. M. T.; Cook, N. J.; Ronaldson, J. P.; Nik, S. J.; Atharifard, A.; Clyne, M.; Bones, P. J.; Bartneck, C.; Grasset, R.; Schleich, N.; Billinghurst, M.; Butler, A. P. H.; Anderson, N. G. (2014-02-05)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    DICOM Raw Data, with explanatory text files.

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  • The post-auricular muscle reflex (PAMR): Its detection, analysis, and use as an objective hearing test

    O'Beirne, G.A. (1998)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    A number of fundamental characteristics of the post-auricular muscle response (PAMR) have been examined in adult and infant human subjects using an automated computer-based measurement system. This system allowed simultaneous examination of the changes in background electrical activity of the PAM, and extraction of information regarding the sound-evoked PAMR waveform, such as response amplitude and peak latency. It was found that the PAMR was best recorded using an active electrode located directly over the body of the muscle, and a reference electrode located on the dorsal surface of the pinna. In addition, it was found that during lateral rotation of the eyes towards the recording electrodes the peak-to-peak amplitude of the PAMR increased by an average of 525%. The increase in response amplitude was highly correlated with the increase in EMG observed during this manoeuvre, suggesting that the mechanisms that increase both EMG and PAMR amplitude probably occur at a common point. The voltage spectrum of the PAMR was also measured. Contrary to previous findings (Thornton, 1975), the voltage spectrum of the PAMR extended from 10 Hz to approximately 550 Hz, with a broad spectral peak centred between 70 Hz and 115 Hz. Finally, a cheap, efficient and reliable objective hearing test was developed, using the correlation measure of the PAMR. The availability of such a device has the potential to vastly increase the number of children that are screened for hearing disorders, especially in poorer communities who do not have the funds or the expertise to establish screening programs using the currently available objective techniques of ABR and oto-acoustic emission measurement.

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