48 results for Unclassified, 2010

  • List of Qualitas Code Corpus Programs used for Encapsulation Research.

    Voigt, Janina; Irwin, Warwick; Churcher, Neville (2010)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    View record details
  • Tool, trophies in interactive learning

    Brogt, E. (2010)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    View record details
  • On the testability of BDI agent systems

    Winikoff, Michael; Cranefield, Stephen (2010-09-28)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Before deploying a software system we need to assure ourselves (and stake- holders) that the system will behave correctly. This assurance is usually done by testing the system. However, it is intuitively obvious that adaptive systems, including agent-based systems, can exhibit complex behaviour, and are thus harder to test. In this paper we examine this “obvious intuition” in the case of Belief-Desire-Intention (BDI) agents. We analyse the size of the behaviour space of BDI agents and show that although the intuition is correct, the factors that influence the size are not what we expected them to be; specifically, we found that the introduction of failure handling had a much larger effect on the size of the behaviour space than we expected. We also discuss the implications of these findings on the testability of BDI agents.

    View record details
  • Memorial Avenue

    Woodruffe, Paul (2010-09-27)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Slideshow developed for the Everyday Collaborative Laboratory for use in public meetings, and presented to the Takapuna Community Board as part of the case for classifying Memorial Avenue as a heritage site.

    View record details
  • Benchmarking computer use in the NZ construction industry

    Davies, Kathryn (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    View record details
  • Training actors in a research theatre company context: A practical analysis of the internal structure of a permanent actor’s laboratory in New Zealand

    Ilgenfritz, Pedro (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    View record details
  • Network, interactive wind generation – Mairaki Downs, Rangiora

    Leaver, Jonathan (2010-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    View record details
  • The impact of educational migration on the professional lives of Colombo Plan scholarship holders

    Collins, Jenny (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This project is producing new knowledge that will add to our understandings of the long term impacts of educational migration on the cultural, economic and professional lives of education migrants and their ongoing engagement as „global‟ citizens. Phase one of this project has now been completed. In 2009 the researcher interviewed 11 former Colombo Plan Scholars in Malaysia and undertook archive searches in Singapore, Wellington, and Dunedin. Phase two is now underway. In 2010 the researcher has undertaken follow-up archive searches in Singapore, Wellington and Christchurch (taking advantage of other travel opportunities and not using URC funding). Follow-up interviews with New Zealand host families; foreign affairs contacts etc are planned. This project is still ongoing. In 2010 the Researcher took up a new programme leadership role and as a consequence of this and the restructuring within the Department of Education there have been some delays in regard to publications emerging of phase one. However, progress in this regard is back on track with an abstract accepted for an international conference (Australia and New Zealand History of Education Society), an invitation to write a chapter for an edited book on Australasian Universities and a paper underway for submission to an international refereed journal.

    View record details
  • Landscape for life - An investigation of opportunities for aesthetic improvement and biodiversity enhancement for living roofs in New Zealand

    Davies, Renee (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Living roofs offer an opportunity to bring conservation into a contemporary context integrated within urban landscapes. Once neglected and under-utilized roof landscapes can now become biodiverse enclaves of indigenous flora and fauna. The microhabitat variables required for lizards, including temperature, humidity, refuge/shelter and prey, on New Zealand’s first fully indigenous extensive living roof have been studied over three years. Temperature and humidity data from a known lizard site has been used to assess the suitability of the living roof in conjunction with a comparison of insects monitored on the living roof and a literature review of lizard diet. This data has provided the research team (an interdisciplinary team of ecologists, landscape architects and product designers) with the parameters needed to develop, prototype and field-test a prosthetic habitat that provides enhanced conditions on the living roof for lizards. Results from stage 1 indicate a New Zealand indigenous extensive living roof plant community can provide the basic microhabitat variables required to support lizards with the exception of humidity. Although existing vegetation will provide refuge from predators and modifies temperature and humidity, the designed prosthetic habitat creates humid micro-sites (refuges), allowing a trial translocation of native skinks. The results of stage 1 have are now providing a solid basis for stage 2 of the research which has met with Department of Conservation approval in principle (meeting held in February), for the progression to a permit for a trial relocation of skinks onto the living roof. Project highlights: Working with product design researchers and students to brainstorm the prosthetic habitat concept. Feedback from International conference which confirmed some of our preliminary results on living roof environmental conditions and emphasised the International relevance of the research. A field visit to Shakespear Regional Park where the prosthetic habitats were put into the field and seeing evidence of lizard use of the habitats.

    View record details
  • Christianity, English language, western education in late Qing China

    Gong, Hong-yu (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    View record details
  • Impact of strengths development upon performance and professional aspirations of students in the 'helping professions'

    Ingamells, Kay (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This project was a pilot study to evaluate the usefulness of StrengthsQuestTM coaching in shaping the aspirations of students in the ‘helping professions’ in New Zealand and to investigate the potential usefulness of a new approach, provisionally known as ‘Narratives of Strengths’ to complement StrengthsQuestTM coaching. The project’s primary aim was to investigate how the usefulness of the Gallup StrengthsQuestTM could be extended by bringing narrative practice to bear on StrengthsQuestTM results. Strengthfinder® identifies an individual’s top 5 strengths based on a sophisticated online questionnaire underscored by 30 years of research. Whilst sophisticated, these Strengthfinder® descriptions become extractions from a person’s life history , leaving them free floating from the context in which they have emerged and been fostered. We saw an opportunity to extend the usefulness of Strengthfinder® results by re-siting them within the contexts of a person’s life. Our experience of narrative practice led us to hypothesize that the sophistication of the Strengthfinder® descriptions would give us a platform for an inquiry into the history of strengths that would not have been otherwise available. Our aim was to ascertain whether Clifton StrengthsQuestTM coaching and ‘Narratives of Strengths’ interviews can make a useful and unique contribution to strengths enhancement worthy of further development in a second research phase.. Our other aims were to research whether or not participation in the Strengthfinder® on its own and the Strengthfinder® together with narrative interviews, could positively support and influence the professional aspirations of social practice and nursing students and impact upon their hope, well-being and emotional engagement. A final, but more minor aim was to ascertain if particular strengths identified by the Clifton Strengthsfinder® occur especially frequently for social work, counselling or nursing students. We speculated that if a particular pattern emerged there might be possible implications for the teaching of social practice and nursing which could then be researched independently. All aspects of the project have been beneficial for the students who took part. All students who took part in the evaluations gave extremely positive accounts of their participation in the research. There were no negative findings. Transcripts of the narrative of strengths interviews indicate that students were not only able to locate their strengths and their development within their life histories but for the majority, doing so produced specific benefits. Reported results indicate themes regarding the influence of the project upon career direction, increased confidence in practice and in study and unanticipated results in their personal lives. Two draft articles have been written to date. The second article summarises the results of the research overall under the themes that emerged and also highlights the results of the narrative of strengths interviews and the seeming usefulness of different aspects of the project for assisting social practice and nursing students in making career choices. We are currently considering which journals we wish to approach. The pilot study has been effective in researching the usefulness of Strengthfinder® , Strengthfinder® coaching and narrative of strengths interviews to social practice and nursing students. The results so far indicate: • That ‘narrative of strengths interviews are a useful tool for situating strengths within life histories and produce insights which lead to change in professional and personal life and impact positively upon hope, engagement and well-being. • Merit in a larger project to further develop and research the use of narrative of strengths interviews with Strengthfinder® and/or Strengthfinder® coaching. More specifically the results indicate that this combination of approaches could be effective in supporting students in the ‘helping professions’ to refine their career aspirations, potentially leading to more effective practice in the field.

    View record details
  • Biosecurity and weed management: Taking into account the biodiversity value of woody invasive alien plant species (invertebrate identification)

    Blanchon, Dan (2010-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    View record details
  • Teaching narrative counselling as a transformative practice: A pilot study investigating whether student learning is akin to client experiences

    Lewis, Dorothea; Gremillion, Helen; Cheshire, Aileen (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The aims and objectives of this pilot project are to 1) develop best practices in the teaching of narrative work; 2) provide a unique and powerful lens for understanding the effectiveness of narrative therapy; and 3) identify intersections between teaching and professional practice in this field. Students in the 2009 PGDip Counselling course at Unitec were interviewed about their positive learning experiences to determine whether these experiences are akin to extant client accounts of successful therapeutic work. Similarities between these two sets of experiences would allow research on teaching practice in this field to inform understandings of effective narrative work. The researchers found that there are indeed significant similarities between these two sets of experiences. Specifically both the teaching and the practicing of successful narrative ideas entail 1) decentring “expert” knowledge; 2) centering the agency of learners (students and clients); and 3) the creation of reflective, interactive, and dialogical space. Positioning theory has emerged as a useful set of ideas for capturing these conclusions, which speak to aim/objectives #2 and #3. Aim/objective 1 will follow from publication and further research.

    View record details
  • Titiro whakamuri, hoki whakamua. We are the future, the present and the past: Caring for self, others and the environment in early years’ teaching and learning

    Ritchie, Jenny; Duhn, Iris; Rau, Cheryl; Craw, Janita (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This project focuses on global issues of ecological sustainability in a variety of national/local early childhood contexts. The research aims to illuminate, document, explore, and explain possibilities for early childhood pedagogies that reflect and enact an ethic of care for self, others, and the environment. The project draws from both kaupapa Maori and western perspectives.

    View record details
  • Family literacy – a case study in how to develop policy

    Benseman, John; Sutton, Alison (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    'Adult learning makes a difference - to the economy of course, to health, well-being, confidence and to our ability to help our children. Alan Tuckett - 4 December 2006 Alan has steadfastly believed that the inherent power of adult learning has been to change adults’ self-perceptions and subsequently their worlds through learning what they needed relevant to their particular interests and issues. Intergenerational family literacy epitomises relevant adult learning. Family literacy programmes engage adults in their role as parents, providing learning opportunities for them to enhance their literacy and, also their parenting skills, particularly in relation to their children’s emerging literacy skills. The programmes recognise adults as learners in their own right, but also as powerful influences on those around them in their homes and communities.

    View record details
  • Learning about Landscape Odo Strewe and the Group

    Francis, Kerry (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In Europe and the United States, landscape architecture came late to the modernist party. New Zealand was no exception. While architects here were exploring variants of modernism from the late 1930s, modernist landscapes did not appear until the middle of that century. When Odo Strewe arrived in Auckland in 1948, his gregarious nature and commitment to the modernist project led him to engage with members of a vibrant arts subculture, mainly in the west of the city. Bill Wilson and other members of the Group, as well as many of their clients, were part of this subculture. This chapter surveys a body of work that Strewe did with the Group, primarily Wilson, and proposes that his development as a practitioner in the new field of landscape architecture was enhanced by this collaboration and by the dialogue that accompanied it. Architecture was a key ingredient. In the absence of any local landscape discourse, it was through his relationship with Wilson and the Group and the projects involving landscape and architecture that Strewe established himself at the forefront of the new discipline.

    View record details
  • A review of ecology in landscape architecture publications

    Haines, Leslie (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In landscape architecture publications, landscape designs that incorporate ecology vary in the degree of ecological functioning that is included. Sustainability is often not specifically differentiated from ecology and the term ecology is used very loosely to support, not just rich and complex ecological design, but designs that include any environmentally-friendly aspects. This can lead to some confusion in clearly representing the degree to which ecological functioning is occurring or intended to occur in the designed or managed environment. This paper is based on a review of article content relating to ecology in Landscape Architecture, which identified topics relating to ecology over the period from 1996 to 2010. Results show that while there is an acknowledgement that landscape architectural designs published in Landscape Architecture contribute toward a ‘greener’ environment, there is room for more ecological complexity to be acknowledged in the profession and for a distinction between complex and singular ecological functioning.

    View record details
  • and yes I said yes I will Yes

    Shand, Peter (2010)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    View record details
  • Review of ‘The Dragon and the Taniwha: Māori and Chinese in New Zealand, edited and introduced by Manying Ip (foreword by Margaret Mutu)’. Auckland: Auckland University Press, 2009. Paperback 373pp. $44.99. ISBN 978 1 86940 436 9. Takahē, 71.3. April 2011 (500 words)

    Allen, Brenda (2010)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    The reviewed volume, ‘The Dragon and the Taniwha: Māori and Chinese in New Zealand', edited and introduced by Manying Ip (foreword by Margaret Mutu), is a scholarly edition of essays. In this review I outline the main topics of the collection and point to the main reasons why, and for whom, these are interesting and/or useful.

    View record details
  • State of Te Reo Maori today

    Ngaha, Arapera (2010-09-19)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    An interview on air about Te Reo Maori revitalisation

    View record details