49 results for Unclassified, 2012

  • Systems dynamics modelling of pathways to a hydrogen economy in New Zealand : final report

    Leaver, Jonathan; Gillingham, Kenneth; Baglino, A. (2012-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This report represents a compilation of work prepared under Objective 6: Carbon to Hydrogen Energy – Proof of Concept of FRST contract C08X0204.

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  • After the quake

    Milke, M. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    This is a book review, though not classified that way by the journal.

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  • The Man of Numbers: Fibonacci's Arithmetic Revolution : Book Review

    Hannah, J. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Practical, Legal and Ethical Issues Surrounding Disaster Reporting in Christchurch in the Last Two Years

    Cheer, U. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    I want to talk a bit about a media project that I started work on over the summer, which is part of a larger project the Faculty of Law at Canterbury is carrying out, investigating the many legal issues that have arisen from the earthquakes.

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  • A Defamation Case in the UK Involving the Qualified Privilege Defence and Why That's Significant for New Zealand

    Cheer, U. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    I will talk about a significant decision from the UK Supreme Court involving the very important developing qualified privilege defence – the Flood case. (We should have a decision in the Chris Cairns case by then too, so I will mention that briefly as well). The Flood case is important for NZ because it indicates how qualified privilege might develop as a defence over here. This decision was a unanimous one which dealt with what we call a preliminary question as to whether Times Newspapers could rely on a defence of qualified privilege in relation to an article it had published with the headline ‘Detective accused of taking bribes from Russian exiles’. The article contained allegations about a Mr Flood, who was a Detective Sergeant in the Extradition Unit of the Metropolitan Police. In the article, DS Flood was identified as possibly being a police officer at the centre of allegations about bribe taking in return for information from the Extradition Unit.

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  • King v Grundon: The need for real and substantial harm in defamation

    Cheer, U. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    I want to talk today about a recent decision of the UK High Court called King v Grundon. This was a defamation decision given extempore, which means an oral judgment given by the judge at the time – live, so to speak, or ‘off the cuff’. Such judgments are in the nature of doing immediate justice, but are persuasive only because of their ‘less thought out’ character. This makes the case a bit obscure, but it has an interesting New Zealand connection and is useful as an example of where the law is going and where it might go here.

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  • Censorship and 'Fifty Shades of Grey'

    Cheer, U. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    I want to talk about censorship of literature today, because the censor’s office just has classified Fifty Shades of Grey, by EL James. This is the book that started life as a piece of fan fiction based on that other classic series of books, the Twilight Saga by Stephanie Meyer. Fifty Shades of Grey, which none of the publishing houses wanted to touch until it took off virally online and became known as ‘mommy porn’. Fifty Shades of Grey is the acceptable book about BDSM (bondage and discipline, dominance and submission and sadism and masochism) sexual practices. It has been suggested the book is so popular because although it is about atypical sexual practices, it is able to be hidden on the kindle, no need to let anyone know you are reading it or the two sequels Fifty Shades Books like these create a bit of a problem for the censorship system. Classics like Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Lolita, De Sade’s Justin, have been around for years, there are lots of them about, and they are accepted to be classics. Fifty Shades is what could be described as an instant classic. The series has sold 350,000 copies here, and it’s been voted Number 5 in Whitcoulls’ top 100 list for 2012-2013. It has sold 40 million copies around the world. Yet on the face of it, the book looks objectionable in terms of our censorship legislation.

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  • Dooley v Smith and Karam v Fairfax: Defamation and public interest cases

    Cheer, U. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    I want to discuss two New Zealand defamation cases today, both of which tend to show an increasing relaxation or opening up of the law in ways which will benefit media.

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  • How the law attempts to deal with hoaxes and pranks in the media that lead to harm

    Cheer, U. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Today I can’t avoid talking about how the law attempts to deal with hoaxes and pranks in the media that lead to harm, following the shocking outcome of the prank by Mel Greig and Michael Christian, hosts of 2Day FM Radio station in Sydney.

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  • Status of the spotted shag (Stictocarbo punctatus) in the Hauraki Gulf

    Galbraith, Mel (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This project studied aspects of the population of spotted shag (Stictocarbo punctatus) that is considered to be in decline in the Hauraki Gulf. The aim of the project was to initiate an update of population data, a necessary precursor to future ecological research intended to inform management of this species and Gulf seabirds in general. Population data was gathered through field surveys of islands of the inner Hauraki Gulf. The project has updated aspects of population data for the species, with the general conclusion that the population is stable, although with fewer breeding colonies than when last surveyed in 1970. The need for further field surveys was also identified. The project findings are to be disseminated as “preliminary results” at the 2012 Ornithological Society of NZ conference.

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  • Landscapes for life (Stage 2) – An investigation of opportunities for aesthetic improvement and biodiversity enhancement for living roofs in New Zealand

    Davies, Renee (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Results from stage 2 of this project have shown that a New Zealand indigenous extensive living roof plant community can provide the basic microhabitat variables required to support lizards with the exception of humidity. Although existing vegetation will provide refuge from predators and modifies temperature and humidity, the designed prosthetic habitat creates humid micro-sites (refuges), allowing a trial translocation of native skinks and ethics approval has now been gained for a trial relocation to occur. The results of stage 2 are now providing a solid basis, including comparison of food species from Shakespear and those found on the roof, of the research. Vegetation cover on the roof has significantly increased in the last year (over 70% cover) which provides further enhancement of potential success for the relocation. Project highlights: • Collaboration with Auckland Council to gain gut contents to analyse to support food source analysis for the relocation and results confirming food source on roof matches with preferred species being eaten by skink. • Feedback from international conference which confirmed that a relocation of lizards has occurred in Australia onto a living roof with great success which will support our permit application with DOC. • A site visit from English living roof expert who has said the living roof at Waitakere is his favourite living roof internationally and is supporting further dissemination of the research at the Green Roof world congress in the Netherlands in September.

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  • Enhancing the learning of professionalism in the context of Web 2.0.

    Gasquoine, Sue (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Thus far this project has involved collaboration nationally and now internationally and is inter-disciplinary in nature. The recruitment strategy used has proved ineffective so while not enough data has been collected to justify analysis, an unanticipated outcome has been the recent inclusion of the international partner & the need to be innovative with recruiting participants. Data collection has now recommenced.

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  • Effecting change in learning and teaching through living curricula implementation

    Keesing-Styles, Linda (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This project focused directly and concertedly on teacher perspectives of the current implementation of the Living Curriculum at Unitec. The major goal was to inform and influence the implementation and professional development components of the Living Curriculum. The project used a case study methodology interviewing teachers from three departments, each representing one of the institution’s three faculties. These were diverse departments reflecting quite different disciplines and teacher perspectives. While some departments were well developed in their thinking and understanding of the Living Curriculum, others were less informed and more resistant. The project team interviewed teachers across the three departments to elicit in-depth information about teacher perspectives and implementation progress. The interviews offered a wealth of valuable information about teacher perspectives. The major finding is the importance of ongoing teacher professional development with regard to interpretation of the Living Curriculum and implications for teaching and learning practice. Allied to this is valuable data on the provision of institutional support and change management for curriculum renewal including the provision of exemplars for teachers.

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  • Extension of use of action research as real and applied research for improvement of teaching and learning at Unitec

    Smith, Mark (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The Action Research Project in 2011 involved a cluster of 12 action research (AR) projects across 6 departments at Unitec – Languages, Sport, Te Puna Ako, the Library, Foundation Studies and Music. Each project was an individual piece of action research, had specific research questions relevant to the project topic and had its own findings. Each was subject to the normal ethics approval process at Unitec. A meta-evaluation of the effectiveness of action research as a professional development strategy was also carried out. It was encouraging to see so many first time researchers taking this initial step into investigating their teaching and learning. The results of the meta-evaluation indicated the benefits of this sort of professional development. The other main aim of the project was to ensure that literacy and numeracy interventions were designed and implemented in a step toward ensuring these became business as usual. This was achieved across all the projects. Another achievement of the project was the cross-disciplinary nature of much of the research. Breaking away from silos saw collaboration between music lecturers and literacy experts, automotive mechanics and academic advisors, lecturers and e-learning advisors, the Departments of Architecture and Languages, Te Puna Ako and the Department of Sport. Finally, because of the number of projects, a layer of mentors was created to ensure that assistance was available to all researchers. This built capability in the Academic Literacies team which has allowed the project to continue in 2012 despite the departure of Eileen Piggot-Irvine.

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  • Modelling and monitoring the Unitec standard house to improve sustainability and indoor environmental quality

    Tait, Robert (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This project takes a two-pronged approach to investigate issues around the thermal performance and internal environment of New Zealand housing. The first stage of measuring has been completed and the BIM model successfully integrated with the simulation software. Unitec has a Faculty of Technology and Built Environment facility for research driven learning in the New Zealand building industry.

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  • A micro-study of Greek female immigrants to New Zealand in the 60s

    Tsoulis, Athina (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The research aim of this research project was to explore the migratory experiences of a distinct group of single women who left Greece en masse to undertake domestic work in New Zealand in the early 1960’s. This was an unprecedented occurrence for traditional Greek culture, which, at the time, was essentially patriarchal and women did not travel, far less live away from home without the supervision of a male or older member of the family. Who were these women, why and how did they persuade their families to allow them to leave, what impact did the freedom and difference of western culture have upon these unchaperoned women and how did it change their lives were some of the questions we sought to discover. The documentary form was chosen to complement the fifteen interviews of representatives of this group we undertook as part of the Ministry of Culture and Heritage’s oral history grant and which will be shortly lodged in the Alexander Turnbull Library for the benefit of future researchers. What became very evident was the devastating impact that World War II had upon the Cretan population, particularly in the west coast in the mountainous regions behind Hania. This was largely due to the punishment meted out by the Germans retaliating against the support the local Cretan population gave to the British and New Zealand forces engaged in the struggle. The Cretans paid dearly for their support and fathers and adult brothers were rounded up systematically and shot or imprisoned in unbearable conditions for long periods, and dwellings and personal possessions were destroyed leaving women and children scrabbling for food and basic necessities. The grind of daily life which had little relief for many of these women who did not know much childhood pleasure, constantly helping the family in daily survival led to many of the women who decided to emigrate long for a better way of life. Many of them resented never enjoying the fruits of their labour or control on how it was spent as money went to male members of the family to dispense with. Many were influenced by the stories coming from the Greek diaspora and their adventurous spirit was aroused as they rejected the lives proscribed for female womanhood in their local environments. The abruptness of the migration experience, severing with all that is familiar and going into the unknown was a traumatic experience no matter how much the women desired to leave. And things were never the same. Community was disrupted and attempts to reclaim this were successful as the new immigrants clung together and recreated familiar Greek rituals and celebrations but again were disrupted as the unsettled immigrants decided to move to Australia to be part of a greater Greek community or returned back home. Visits home highlighted the disruption for these women as villages were emptied, loved ones dead or gone, villages becoming ghost towns. We found that the Greek women we interviewed were reluctant to criticise their new host country and many spoke well of how they were treated by New Zealanders. Yet the toll the migration experience had upon them and their children is quite profound.

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  • Measuring social cohesion in community settings: Case studies of pre- and post-Internet intervention

    Williams, Jocelyn (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This case study in a school community near Unitec, in Avondale, aimed to assess strategies for building social cohesion as an element in successful implementation of a community internet scheme. It focused specifically on a subsidiary goal to examine the use of social media as tools for building social cohesion. The work involved mentoring among and informal discussions and focus groups with a proportion of 31 parents who were participating in the implementation of Computers in Homes at the school. My previous research indicates a need to further investigate the role of social support among late adopter, new users of the internet, and this study is progressing that work by addressing a role for online social networking. Results, as in previous studies within Computers in Homes, reinforce the conclusion that this organization uses very effective face-to-face socialisation strategies to enhance belonging and support, but also that the Ning social network appears to be of particular appeal to parents in this situation, offering a new medium for finding support. The latter finding is encouraging and is the subject of ongoing evaluation. As detailed in other sections below, findings are emerging from copious data that still needs analyzing but has been referred to in two quality-assured publications. Considerable volumes of further analysis and commentary needs to be done and will emerge in new publications in 2012.

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  • Cool new Asia : experiencing East Asian popular culture

    Wilson, Scott (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Cool New Asia: East Asian Popular Culture in a Local Context was held at Unitec during the weekend of November 25-26th. The symposium attracted two international keynote speakers (Professor Koichi Iwabuchi and Professor Matt Allen), twenty-six speakers from both national and international tertiary environments and approximately one hundred and twenty attendees over the two days. The papers delivered covered a range of disciplines and theoretical approaches and, as was hoped, reflected a broad interdisciplinary examination, from across the humanities, of ideas pertaining to popular culture in general, Asian popular culture (of a variety of forms), in particular, and other issues related to these two including population diaspora, second-language education, representation and self-representation, and community construction, location and relocation as a result of globalisation. The weekend delivered a number of highlights; of these, the cultural performances by Madang Hannuri (a Korean performance troupe), the E-Pacs Lion Dance Team, and Hokushin Shinoh Ryu Iaido (a Japanese martial arts troupe) were the most popular and engaging. However, beyond the world of cultural performance, the symposium’s chief success, we believe, was that it (a) successfully identified a hitherto overlooked area of study, (b) provided a forum for a rigorous examination of issues pertaining to these, and (c) offers an opportunity to continue this exploration as the Cool New Asia project moves into its second phase. This second phase – discussed in the initial application for funding – refers to the manner with which Drs. Kolesova and Wilson are working to develop concrete research outcomes out of the material generated by the symposium. More information about this is provided below. The symposium organizers wish to extend their enormous gratitude and thanks to the URC committee for making such a successful event possible. We would particularly like to acknowledge the incredible help provided by Brenda Massey.

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  • The everyday collective laboratory: Suburban interventions

    Woodruffe, Paul (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The highlights of the project were the discoveries made into inter-disciplinary research methodology and strategies for small-scale design interventions in advocating for community environmental projects. The approach was to continue to develop relationships with the community organizations that I had worked with in the previous research period in 2010. Previous findings made clear the necessity for small-scale inexpensive interventions to inform and advocate for initiatives identified by the collaboration between our researchers and the community. Two methods were considered to be the most effective. Firstly the use of QR Codes placed within the landscape that would direct visitors to both the research findings, and the community websites created to support the cultural activities existing within the neighbourhood. Secondly the use of a 30 edition lithographic print that articulated both the history of the subject sites and the agreed concept to develop a heritage walkway, this edition was distributed amongst the community stakeholders and decision makers in local government. Auckland Council Parks and Heritage expressed an interest in trialling the use of QR Codes in a test area, and we are having on-going discussions on this. Both of these interventions proved to have great potential to inexpensively deliver the ability to both record and disseminate information discreetly, as well as to lobby for legal protection, restoration and present design solutions for a specific environmental issue.

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  • Baetsch in the city - Vienna, Austria

    Woodruffe, Paul; Klasz, Walter (2012-09)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The objectives were to create a building that at once is both familiar and strange, and to use materials gathered by the local people from the surrounding environment and to use this process to facilitate storytelling and dialog through the discovery of common ground. Place: Nietzchplatz, Sandleiten, Ottakring, Vienna, Austria

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