49 results for Unclassified, 2013

  • The effects of aural input enhancement on L2 acquisition

    Reinders, Hayo; Cho, Meiyoung (2013-07)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Input enhancement involves attempts to direct the learner’s attention to specific linguistic forms in target language input (Sharwood Smith, 1993). One way to do this is by manipulating the input in order to attract learners’ attention to the target feature, for example, by underlining or bolding it or by artificially increasing its frequency in the input (an input flood). A number of studies have investigated the effects of enriched input (e.g., Jourdenais, Ota, Stauffer, Boyson, & Doughty, 1995; Reinders & Ellis, 2009; Trahey & White, 1993; White, 1998). Although there is some evidence that enriched input can affect L2 acquisition of certain grammatical features, the results are not conclusive. Furthermore, previous studies have been limited to textual input enrichment. In this chapter we investigated the effects of aural input enhancement, a type of input enhancement that to the best of our knowledge has not been reported on before. Participants in the study were given an audiobook to listen to outside of class in which passive structures had been manipulated by 1) artificially increasing the volume slightly of the target items or by 2) slowing down the speed with which the target items were read out. A control group listened to the audiobooks in their original form. The repeated-measures ANOVA analysis showed no significant effect for the manipulated input on acquiring the target form. We discuss some possible reasons for this finding.

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  • Self-access and independent learning centres

    Reinders, Hayo (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Self-access centres are learner-oriented language learning environments that encourage the development of learner autonomy (see LEARNER AUTONOMY). Self-access centres (SACs) provide materials, activities, and staff support to help learners develop the skills necessary for taking control over the content, pace, and method of their learning. SACs do not have to be physical spaces (although in practice they often are); increasingly, learning environments are being designed that either combine a physical space with an online support system or that provide all elements of self access online (see for example the Electronic Learning Environment and My English in the further reading section (Alford & Pachler, 2007; Conacher & Kelly-Holmes, 2007). SACs are especially common at tertiary institutions, although they exist at all other school levels, including in primary schools.

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  • Could your school have a STEM emphasis?

    Conner, L. (2013)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    There are various descriptions of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics education around the world. In the USA it includes the fields of Chemistry, Computer and Information Technology Science, Engineering, Geosciences, Life Sciences, Mathematical Sciences, Physics, and STEM Education and Learning Research. Partly differences in what is included in STEM arise due to different views of technology and the levels of integration of the subjects as they are combined or not, in curricula design. In the international arena, technology tends to be synonymous with ICT. In New Zealand, we have a separate subject domain called technology that includes design for innovation through technological practice, knowledge, and understanding about the nature of technology. Effective communication, including the use of information technology, collaboration, problem-solving, creative and critical thinking skills are fundamental to STEM.

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  • Bob Ham (1937-2012): A Pioneer in Waste Management

    Milke, M. (2013)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    This special issue of Waste Management is a series of papers in memory of Bob Ham. The papers are by former students and close colleagues, and also by researchers following along the paths blazed by Bob. As a preface to these papers, and a tribute to his memory, a number of contributors have provided their reflections.

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  • The Law Around Leaking and Breach of Confidence

    Cheer, U. (2013)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    As we know, it’s been a month of leaking, blogging and breaching court orders. I thought it would be a good idea to try and answer some general questions around the relevant laws, some of which have got mangled a bit in the reporting. What is a leak in terms of the law? Usually a leak involves a person who works for the government, a private organisation or for another individual publishing information that belongs to their employer and which they only know because of their employment relationship, to someone else who is not entitled to have it. This sort of activity is covered by the law called breach of confidence. This is not a criminal offence, but rather is a civil (or private) claim which one party brings against another. Third parties who receive such information and pass it on even though they know it is confidential, or even if they simply should know it is confidential, may also be breaching confidence. This area of the law is one that often impacts on media, which commonly receives information in unmarked envelopes, anonymous phone calls and so on.

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  • Media law - disaster reporting

    Cheer, U. (2013)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Today I want to discuss the ongoing issue of how the internet is affecting areas of media law – in this case, defamation law. Many questions have been raised about the issue of publication on the internet and whether it should be treated any differently than publication in any other media, such as hard copy newspapers, broadcasting, on bill boards and the like.

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  • Juries and the use of social media during trials

    Cheer, U. (2013)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Media reported recently that there may be an attempt to stop the Jesse Ryder assault case because of publication of material that may damage the accused’s right to fair trial. One of the concerns in cases like this is that information will stay on the internet and juries might get access to it later. This really raises the issue of how to apply the sub judice laws to the internet. So today I thought I would talk about a recent study in Australia that has looked at juries and social media. This was a report carried out for the Victorian Department of Justice and published this year. The researchers there looked at what other studies world-wide have shown about what jurors do with social media, and also at what other Commonwealth countries do to address possible prejudice that might arise. This report is only about social media use, not internet use generally, although it must be said that many of the problems identified apply to the internet but perhaps not in such extreme forms.

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  • Research-informed teaching of adults : a worthy alternative to old habits and hearsay?

    Benseman, John (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    How and why teachers teach the way they do is central to understanding the impact of education on learners. While many professions have integrated research findings into their practitioners’ practice, education’s record is less consistent in this respect. This paper outlines the case for teachers to become research-informed in their teaching (RIT). It firstly considers what is involved in being research-informed, what types of research are most relevant, why it warrants consideration as well as issues associated with it. It then reviews RIT in the New Zealand context and particularly in relation to teaching adults. Finally, the paper looks at how an RIT approach might be implemented.

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  • Revisiting old friends: using molecular data to characterise the diversity of a lichen genus in New Zealand

    Blanchon, Dan (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This project aims to determine which species of the lichen genus Parmotrema are found in New Zealand, describe any new species and identify if any species are threatened with extinction.

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  • Robotic chair for remote cardiovascular risk assessment

    Jayawardena, Chandimal (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The objective of this project was to develop an intelligent robotic chair for cardiovascular risk assessment. The first prototype of the chair is currently in the technical testing phase. This robotic chair can engage users (patients) using human-robot interaction strategies and help them improve their cardiovascular risk. It measures several clinical parameters within a short period of time, by providing appropriate instructions to the user. Collectively these measurements can be used to provide a comprehensive assessment of the severity of heart failure symptoms, and this information may then be used to guide management and avoid hospital admission.

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  • Promoting heritage: a conservation study of Apia courthouse

    Schnoor, Christoph (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The overall aim of the project was to protect the former Courthouse in Apia, Samoa from demolition, to research its history and its current physical state, to prepare a plan for its protection, restoration and future use. Also, through publicly showing the steps of the process, the project aimed at raising awareness about the necessity and problematic current situation of heritage conservation in Samoa

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  • Unitec Research Houses

    Tait, Robert (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Internationally there is a move to more airtight buildings as a means of conserving energy. Air tightness is a measure of possible infiltration through the building envelope and is often confused with ventilation within the industry. This project focuses on the impact on the overall internal space temperatures and humidity. Light timber frame houses in New Zealand are not performing to recomended temperature and humidity levels.

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  • Entertainment Lab for the Very Small Screen

    Wagner, Daniel (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Student participants in three countries across the planet collaborated to make movies, with their mobile phones, about environmental sustainability. The thirty‐nine participants ‐ film & television students at Unitec PASA; acoustics and sound students at Salford University in Manchester, UK; and graphic design students at Université de Strasbourg in Strasbourg, France ‐ divided into four international teams (each of which consisted of students from all three countries). They used a variety of Web 2 tools – Google Docs, Google+ Hangouts, Twitter, Dropbox, WordPress ‐ to collaboratively determine the specific subject matter and the story of each team’s film, the shots they would need to tell each story, and in which country each shot would be taken. In the end, they delivered four mobile movies that looked at different sustainability sub‐topics. The project was capped with feedback from the lecturers involved and by video reflections from the students.

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  • Focus on Fiji: GIS Mapping to Support Conservation Planning

    Winder, Linton; Aguilar, Glenn (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In collaboration with the Institute of Applied Science of the University of the South Pacific in Suva, Fiji, the project conducted research on the development of a Geographic Information System for biodiversity conservation, development planning and environmental management. The objectives of the research include the characterization of the spatial distribution of key organisms that are of conservation interest, the determination of the effects of environmental perturbations such as climate change and contributing models that support mitigation strategies and conservation prioritization.

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  • Yes, we do need evidence to show whether Te Whāriki is effective : a reply to Anne Smith’s discussion paper, “Does Te Whāriki need evidence to show it is effective?”

    Blaiklock, Ken (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Te Whāriki, the New Zealand Early Childhood Curriculum, was released in 1996. Since that time, it has been widely praised by academics and teachers in this country and beyond. Although there is much to admire in the aspirations of the document, a number of important concerns have been raised about its efficacy. These concerns were noted as part of a presentation I gave to the Ministry of Education on October 23, 2013, “Early Childhood Education and Care in New Zealand: A Closer Look at the Evidence”. (A copy of the powerpoint slides from the presentation is attached as an appendix.)

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  • Colonic transit studies to measure gastrointestinal motility in antipsychotic treated patients

    Every-Palmer, Susanna; Ellis, Pete M; Stanley, James; Nowitz, Mark; Dunn, Helen; Huthwaite, Mark; Grant, Eve (2013-10-30)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    This is the research protocol for an observational (cross-sectional) study investigating gastrointestinal motility in antipsychotic treated patients. Recruitment for this study will begin in 2014.

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  • Adult education : New Zealand, to 2012

    Benseman, John (2013-11-07)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Adult education, New Zealand, to 2012. In its broadest sense, adult education refers to the education of anyone beyond school-age. Historically, the sector has constantly evolved as elements of its provision have matured into autonomous sectors in their own right, leaving adult education to constantly re-invent itself on the boundaries of the educational mainstream in its mission of meeting adult learner needs. Maori education, Colonial adult education, Workers’ Educational Association (WEA), After World War I, Depression and World War II, Council of Adult Education, Including new populations in adult education - Maori, Women, From the mid-twentieth century, Reorganisation from the 1970s, Challenges of neoliberal policy and Global Financial Crisis, Significance of adult education in New Zealand.

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  • The governance of high performance sport

    Ferkins, Dr Lesley; Bottenburg, Maarten Van (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Upon completion of this chapter the reader should be able to:  Discuss meanings and definitions associated with the governance of sport in the high performance setting  Distinguish between organizational governance and systemic governance in relation to the evolving nature of high performance governance practice  Discuss issues and trends associated with the governance of high performance sport on the international stage

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  • Children Witnessing Parental Violence: A Social Worker from Aotearoa/New Zealand Responds, response within Case study #1:Children witnessing parental violence

    Keddell, Emily; Pukepuke, Tepora (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Social work within each national context is complex and multifaceted—Aotearoa/New Zealand (A/NZ) is no different. Social workers fulfill a vast array of roles ranging from care to control, from agent of the state to activist, from educator to health promoter to family worker. The role of “social worker” has public, sanitized,and carefully delineated definitions made by professional associations, registration boards, and agency-based role descriptions, yet these often belie the underlying rubric of inconsistencies, power dynamics, tensions,and complexities of actual practice. Thus, it’s difficult to state with authority what a typical social worker would do in regard to this case study, as other A/NZ social workers may dispute the version of the “truth” about what actions a social worker might take in this case. Given these general caveats, the presentation here is one possible response within the A/NZ setting to the case study of Amina.

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  • Does ethnicity influence the choice of language learning strategies?

    Mizutani, Satomi; Dallow, Tomoko (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Introduction There has been very little research on learning strategies used by learners of Japanese as a foreign language (Grainger 2006). Furthermore, ethnicity has not attracted much attention as an influential variable in such studies (Grainger 1997). The study This study aims to fill the gap by investigating the types of learning strategies used by learners of Japanese in New Zealand and the relationship between their use of learning strategies and their ethnicity. The research questions of this study were: (1) what types of learning strategies are reportedly used by learners of the Japanese language as a foreign language?; and (2) to what extent does the use of language learning strategies vary depending on learners’ ethnicity?

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