62 results for Unclassified, 2015

  • National Household Survey of Energy and Transportation: Energy Cultures Two

    Wooliscroft, Ben (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Executive Summary Key findings: • A clear picture of the state of the energy efficiency of our housing stock, our household energy behaviours and our driving (and transport) behaviours has been collected. • Four clear clusters of energy consumers are identified: – The Energy Comfortable (23.7%) have less remedial (e.g. dehumidifier) energy use. They live in warm dry houses. – The Energy Poor (21.1%) not only have the lowest incomes, they also have the lowest number of energy efficiency household modifications and practise the least number of energy saving driving behaviours. – The Energy Average (24.6%) are exactly that, exceptional in very few attributes. There are significant opportunities for them to save energy. – The Energy Efficient (24.3%) earn a similar amount to the Energy Average and the Energy Comfortable but have power bills similar to the Energy Poor. • New Zealand’s housing stock is frequently not adequately insulated or efficiently heated • Many New Zealanders do not practise energy saving behaviours around the house, including behaviour as simple as turning off lights in un-occupied rooms. This research gives insight into the frequency with which behaviours are practised. • There is considerable opportunity to save money through efficient driving (most estimates are 15%) however many efficient driving behaviours are not practised by our sample. • The earthquake in Christchurch is clearly found in the results with regard to heating, transportation and traffic issues. • Poor energy behaviour in the house is strongly related to poor driving (from an energy point of view) and a low energy efficient house. • The results would suggest that a systems approach to improving energy consumption will reap the best rewards.

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  • Energy Behaviour of SMEs in New Zealand

    Walton, Sara (2015-03)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    ©  2015  The  Author  

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  • Review: Bowlby 25th Annivesary Memorial conference

    Dorahy, M.J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Supporting your practice

    McChesney, J.; Wilson, S. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Fix our future. We have the tools. Let's use them. Survey Report. [Generation Zero Survey Report. Auckland: Unitec, Department of Communication Studies].

    Dodson, Giles; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Fallas, Kristo; Greenbrook-Held, Jeremy; Serpes, Kirk (2015-06)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Objective This paper presents findings from a 2014 membership survey of Generation Zero, a youth-led climate change activist organization, in existence since 2010. The survey was conducted as part of the Generation Zero: online activism in NZ research project. Findings The research finds that Generation Zero’s membership is very significantly homogenous, across several demographic indicators, such as geographic location, age, socio-economic class and political preference. As expected, the data shows the Generation Zero membership is politically engaged and highly supportive of pro-climate policies and rhetoric. Recommendations If Generation Zero seeks wider engagement and participation beyond a highly engaged, homogenous and activist core, to deepen public engagement with issues of climate politics and communication, and to achieve change in these areas, broadening the appeal of the organisation to diverse membership may be required. The analysis of the findings offers some preliminary insights in this regard. Multivariate regression analysis indicates several opportunities for Generation Zero to shape its campaigns and communication towards a more diverse membership, primarily among supporters of centrist political parties.

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  • Managing social media in sport

    Scott, Olan; Bruffy, Katherine; Naylor, Michael (2015)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In 2013, sport comprised just 1% of television content, yet nearly half of all Tweets produced during that period were sport related (Nielsen 2014). Other social media is used extensively in conjunction with sport consumption as well. It is more important than ever for sport organizations and athletes to prioritise these platforms in an overall marketing strategy. SNSs have profoundly impacted how fans access information and interact with their favourite teams. Social media has enabled organizations across the sport industry to have an unfiltered voice in the marketplace. The majority of content is no longer vetted by journalists, editors or producers. Sport organizations have responded to this change by incorporating SNSs into their communications, promotion, and sponsorship strategy. As this relatively new communication platform evolves, it is important for those involved in the management and marketing of sport to understand some of the key issues that have arisen from the utilization of social media. In this chapter the reader will be introduced to various ways in which sport organizations use social media to build a brand, develop relationships with stakeholders, and market products and services

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  • The house crow (Corvus splendens): a threat to New Zealand?

    Fraser, Diane; Aguilar, Glenn; Nagle, William; Galbraith, Mel; Ryall, Colin (2015-05-04)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The house crow (Corvus splendens), a native of the Indian subcontinent, has shown a rapid expansion of habitat range across Eastern Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, Europe and Asia. It is an adaptable, gregarious commensal bird which is regarded globally as an important pest species due to its impacts on livestock, agricultural and horticultural crops and indigenous fauna and as a fecal contaminator of human environments and water resources. Two Maxent (v3.3.3k) models (A) with presence data in Australia and (B) with simulated entry data locations in New Zealand) and a third ArcGIS model (C) with environmental and social layers) are used to determine an overall suitability index and establish a niche-based model of the potential spatial distribution for C. splendens within New Zealand. The results show that New Zealand, particularly the northern regions of North Island, has suitable environments for the establishment of the house crow. In order of suitability Model B showed highest potential land area suitability (31.84%) followed by Model A (13.79%) and Model C (10.89%). The potential for further expansion of this bird’s invasive range is high and, if New Zealand is invaded, impacts are likely to be significant.

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  • Thesis review : the manifestation of race in everyday communication interactions in New Zealand

    Henson, Donna (2015-11-17)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In the second of the Theses Review series Dr Donna Henson reviews the work of Elizabeth Revell. ‘This thesis presents an interesting and thoughtful autoethnographic inquiry into the manifestation of race in everyday communication interactions in New Zealand. An uncommon choice of both topic and method in the local communication disciplinary context, Revell presents a partial collaborative autoethnographic approach to the study that entails the reflexive analysis of qualitative data drawn from solicited participant diaries, semi-structured interviews and focus groups.’

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  • Chaos to Capability : Educating Professionals for the 21st Century

    Hays, Jay (2015-10-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Built on two decades of research, thought, writing, and teaching, in Chaos to Capability: Educating Professionals for the 21st Century, Hays argues that a transformation in higher education teaching and learning is crucial and possible. Convincing evidence indicates that conventional university education inadequately equips graduates for the complexity, contention, and contestability they will confront upon entry into their professional careers and pressing needs locally and globally for initiative and self-direction, creativity, and collaboration. This monograph explores these insufficiencies, presents a core set of capabilities and dispositions required of professionals in the 21st Century—a curriculum for the modern age—and discusses practical issues and implications with respect to implementation. Topics addressed include (1) educating for uncertainty and unknowability, (2) the vicious-cycle, unanticipated consequences of conventional approaches to education, (3) the requisite paradigm shifts and role transitions in teaching and learning, (4) unlearning, threshold concepts, and transformational learning, and (5) the paradoxical nature of chaos and its contribution to capability-building. Key contributions include models of the learning continuum, with its portrayal of and distinctions between learning backward and learning forward, and the cube, which depicts the intersection of capabilities, dispositions, and discipline-specific knowledge and skill. Hays concludes by claiming that the attributes, meta-abilities, and dispositions catalogued in Chaos to Capability comprise a "curriculum for the unknown", the requisite repertoire of professionals and professional practice for the new millennium global world. This curriculum is attained, he suggests, not by greater quantity of content, but of more encompassing, holistic, and authentic design and delivery. Guidance provided on how to do this may help educators develop programmes more in keeping with realities of the 21st Century.

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  • More than a bridge builder

    Gong, Hong-Yu (2015)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    For around thirty years, from the early 1980s to the present day, Jack Body has been the single most powerful force in the introduction of China's multi-faceted musical culture to New Zealand. As far as I can now reconstruct the sequence, Jack came to 'discover' Chinese music through Chinese composers; he came to Chinese composers through a preoccupation with sounds. Jack's acquaintance with Chinese music started in the early 1980s, if not earlier, when, as a co-organiser of the Asia Pacific Festival and Composers' Conference, he invited Chinese composers from Taiwan (Hsu Tsang­ Houei), the United States of America (Chou Wenchung) and the People's Republic of China (Qu Wei and Ye Xiaogang) to Wellington. A most original composer, Jack'sapproach to Chinese music is intuitive rather than cerebral. He looked at China from three different perspectives: first, his fascination with Asian traditional music and the contemporary compositional scene, which led him to conduct extended fieldwork in China's south and north-west and to have frequent contact with Chinese composers of different generations and diaspora; second, his interest in ethnomusicology, which enabled him to accumulate the data that would engender creative outputs; and third, his love of documenting, which would add an archival dimension to his efforts.

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  • Emerging technologies in New Zealand: A pedagogical framework for mobile social media

    Cochrane, Thomas Donald; Narayan, Vickel; Oldfield, James (2015)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In this chapter we critique three mlearning case studies in a variety of higher education contexts illustrating how mlearning can enable authentic learning. Drawing on these experiences we explore how collaborative curriculum design can practically implement authentic mobile learning. Applying the nine principles of authentic learning to the context of mlearning has led us to identify six critical success factors for implementing mobile learning and has resulted in the development of a mobile social media framework for implementing authentic learning. We conclude that mobile learning can be a powerful catalyst for enabling authentic learning. Emerging technologies in New Zealand: A pedagogical framework for mobile social media - ResearchGate. Available from: http://www.researchgate.net/publication/268078730_Emerging_technologies_in_New_Zealand_A_pedagogical_framework_for_mobile_social_media [accessed May 28, 2015].

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  • Seven Tragedies of Sophocles - Oedipus the King

    Bond, Robin (2015-05-25)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Translated by Robin Bond

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  • Thesis review: Dis/identifications and dis/articulations: young women and feminism in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Connor, Helene (2015-02-02)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In the first of the Theses Review Series Dr Helene Connor reviews the work of Laura Ashton: “I don’t necessarily go out there and tell everyone that I’m a feminist, but I won’t go out there and tell everyone that I’m a musician either”: Dis/identifications and Dis/articulations: Young Women and Feminism in Aotearoa/New Zealand. In this thoroughly researched and skillfully written thesis, the premise is that whilst many young women value the work of the early feminists in terms of gender equality and individual freedom for themselves, only a small number position themselves as feminist.

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  • The Participation of Women Employed in Traditionally Male Dominated Occupations including Plumbing: 1975 – 2013

    Cruickshank, Garry (2015-02)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Author Garry Cruickshank investigates the gender gap in New Zealand’s plumbing profession. Having established that the proportion of female plumbers is almost unchanged since 1975, Cruickshank compares this information with data gathered from other trades and exposes the widespread nature of this trend across traditionally male dominated industries. The author reflects on what could to be done to alter this situation.

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  • Supporting Language Learning on the Move. An evaluative framework for mobile language learning resources.

    Reinders, Hayo; Pegrum, Mark (2015)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Mobile learning is becoming increasingly common, and mobile learning resources for supporting the teaching and learning of language are now widely available (Pegrum, 2014). There is, however, little systematic research into their benefits, with most publications reporting case studies of pilots or trials, and data largely consisting of learners’ and teachers’ perceptions (Burston, 2013). As useful as these studies are, they do not necessarily help teachers to identify those aspects of mobile resources that can make a significant pedagogical contribution in particular learning contexts. This chapter presents a framework for evaluating mobile-assisted language learning (MALL) resources, which may take the form of web services or apps (or collections of websites or apps), referred to here as mobile materials; or which may take the form of activities designed around websites or apps, referred to here as mobile activities. In both cases, the websites and apps may either have a dedicated language learning focus or be generic in nature. After a discussion of the nature of mobile hardware and software, we consider the evaluation of MALL resources, which in fact means an evaluation of the learning design of those resources. We present five categories according to which their learning design may be evaluated, namely the use of the affordances of the devices, general pedagogical approaches, specific L2 pedagogical approaches, second language acquisition (SLA) principles, and affective principles. We synthesise these points into an evaluative framework that can be used by practitioners to appraise particular MALL resources or even guide their own production of such resources.

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  • Charity, philanthropy, humanitarianism and knitting. Really?

    Elliott, Susan (2015-03)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The first record of humanitarian knitting in NZ relates to the Onehunga Ladies Benevolent Society which was formed in 1857 to feed and clothe women and children who were evacuated to Onehunga from Waiau Pa across the Manukau Harbour during the land wars in the northern Waikato. (Nicholson, 1998). This set a pattern which endures. The organisation still exists and is the oldest women’s organisation in Australasia.

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  • Product design of a pair of ergonomic crutches

    Buckley, Paula (2015)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Traditional full length crutches have fallen out of favour with the medical profession and consumers as they routinely cause arm injuries (blistering, broken vessels in the veins and swelling) and can sometimes lead to a condition known as crutch paralysis, or crutch palsy, which arises from the pressure put on nerves in the armpit, or axilla. Many consumers use forearm crutches, but these have their own disadvantages in that the load on the body during their use is not evenly dispersed, resulting in huge strain being placed on the shoulder, neck and back. The purpose of this project was to research and design a viable alternative to traditional crutches based on the muscular system of a human leg. The crutch would incorporate a shock absorbing feature to reduce jarring and repetitive strain on the body of the user. An ergonomic crutch was designed, featuring a curved centre pole, as opposed to a straight central pole. The researcher is currently working towards the development of a prototype of the crutch made of carbon fibre, with the aim of taking it to a clinical trial at the WDHB.

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  • New Zealand Conservation status of New Zealand earthworms, 2014

    Buckley, Thomas R.; Boyer, Stephane; Bartlam, Scott; Hitchmough, Rod; Rolf, Jeremy; Stringer, Ian (2015-05)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The conservation status of all known New Zealand Megascolecid earthworm taxa (179 taxa) was assessed using the New Zealand Threat Classification System (NZTCS). A full list is presented, along with a statistical summary and brief notes on the most important changes. 105 taxa are ranked Data Deficient, 1 Declining, 31 Naturally Uncommon, 40 Not Threatened and 2 Introduced and Naturalised. This list replaces all previous NZTCS lists for earthworms.

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  • Analysis of PGF ORS and SRS data 2011-2014. Report for the Problem Gambling Foundation – July 2015

    Bridgman, Geoffrey (2015-07)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This analysis is based on data collected between 2011 and 2015. All clients in the database started after 31/12/2010 and none started after 31/12/2014, although data up to April 2015 from clients who had started in 2014 or earlier is used. Overall there were 17756 sessions with 17368 Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) complete data sets, and 16941 Session Rating Scale (SRS) completed data sets. Data sets marked 0,0,0,0 ( the four sub-scales of both the ORS and SRS) were counted as genuine, although it probable that much of this data should have been entered as blank (i.e. the test was not done) or treated as spoiled data.

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  • Submission to the Select Committee on Health: Public Health (Protection) Amendment Bill

    Saxton, Peter; Ludlam, Adrian (2015-02-13)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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