40 results for Unclassified, 2016

  • Time for a change / workbook one : preparing for residential treatment

    Birks Ang, Ben; Forrester, Rachel; Buglass, Andrew; Brett, Rohelle; Doswell, Kate; Noomotu, Tangi; Christie, Debbie; Koning, Ashley; Fowler, Michelle; Hampton, Jacqui (2016)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This workbook is designed to help you get ready for your residential stay, so you can get the most out of it. Over the next few pages, you’ll get a chance to think about how it might work for you, and what you need to do to get ready for your stay with us. You can work through this workbook by yourself, or with others – like a supportive friend or your drug and alcohol practitioner.

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  • Thesis review : Gender, migration and communication networks : mapping the communicative ecology of Latin American migrant women in New Zealand /Aotearoa

    Ayallo, Irene (2016-10-04)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In this thesis, the author investigates the role of communication networks in the pre-and post-migration process of Latin American women resettled in New Zealand. This well researched and skilfully written thesis begins from the premise that while the process of migration and resettlement is complex and challenging for all migrants, it is more demanding for women. Because of socially constructed biological and social differences, which usually portray women as subordinate to men, the conventional perception is that women are dependent on their husbands and less active in the migration decision and process. This view is negated in this thesis. Latin American women in this study voluntarily migrated as skilled migrants and/or for professional reasons. The author also discusses how women use formal and informal communication networks to integrate, to maintain their culture and language, and for personal development. The narratives of Latin American women migrating to New Zealand and their communication networks were, however, absent in literature and this thesis sets out to address this gap.

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  • Middle managers play an essential role in executing change

    Arnaud, N.; Mills, C.E. (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    There is much talk about change and how managers must communicate during change to ensure it occurs smoothly. However, seldom does advice for managing change go beyond the language of change; the ways to explain a proposed change and persuade workers of its importance and how they can ‘get on board’. This advice rarely looks at the non-verbal tools that managers can have at their disposal to influence change. How does materiality contribute in practice to the implementation of a strategic change? And what kind of materiality can be mobilised in this process? These are the two questions we addressed in a paper recently published in the British Journal of Management entitled Materializing Strategy in Mundane Tools: the Key to Coupling Global Strategy and Local Strategy Practice?

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  • Submission to the Parliamentary Select Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade on the New Zealand Intelligence and Security Bill

    Small, D. (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The absent elephant in the 2016 : Modernising Child Youth and Family Expert Panel Report

    Kenkel, David (2016-04)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Sometimes the most interesting thing about a new policy document or report is not what is present in the document but what is absent. On receiving the report Investing in New Zealand’s Children and Their Families I used the very simple textual analysis technique of searching for the frequency of what I considered important words. Such a simple analysis does not necessarily create a window into the minds and thinking of the authors; however it does give some indications about what they consider important at least as measured by how frequently they talk about it.

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  • They are the elements in the room but only very briefly

    Hartshorn, R.M. (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Chemistry made it into the mainstream news last week, following the announcement from the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) that four new elements have been discovered. So is this a big deal and what does it really mean? Well, like many things, the answer is that it depends on who you are and what you care about. But apart from anything else, in the complete history of human activity we have (now) found only 118 elements, so discovering one, let alone four, is a rare and remarkable event.

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  • Using citizen science for coastal data collection

    Orchard, Shane (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Coastal News, 62, 3-4.

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  • Thesis review : the role of SANZ, a migrant radio programme, in making sense of place for South African migrants in New Zealand

    Meadows, Michael (2016-11-15)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This study is a detailed, qualitative exploration of the role played by a South African migrant radio programme, SANZ Live, in supporting its audience to create a sense of place in Auckland, New Zealand, through a range of on- and off-air activities. The thesis concludes that SANZ Live contributes to the creation of opportunities for South African migrants to find a sense of place through producing media content, participating in face-to-face communication through the off-air activities of SANZ Live, participating in SANZ Live social media and perpetuating aspects of South African culture through various programme-related activities. This multi-layered participation works to establish a new routine and a hybrid culture that enables South African migrants to establish new individual, group and collective identities – establish new individual, group and collective identities – becoming ‘South African Kiwis’ – in their new home of choice.

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  • Transition to a low-carbon economy for New Zealand

    Sims, Ralph; Barton, Barry; Bennett, Paul; Isaacs, Nigel; Kerr, Suzi; Leaver, Jonathan; Reisinger, Andy; Stephenson, Janet (2016-04)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The problem The climate is changing. Average temperatures are increasing due to human activity, which has driven increasingly high levels of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 2015 Paris Climate Agreement adopted by 195 countries has the goal that the world will limit the increase in global temperature to well below 2 degrees Celsius (2 degrees C) above pre-industrial levels, and will pursue efforts to limit the increase to below 1.5 degrees C. Global GHG emissions continue to rise and under current trends, the world is heading towards a global 3–4 degrees C temperature rise. This will result in negative impacts on the global economy and significantly increase the risks from climate change through rising temperatures, accelerated sea level rise, changes in rainfall patterns, more frequent extreme weather events, and higher costs to adapt or protect ourselves and our infrastructure. We will need our economy to become more resilient. In order to limit temperature rise, we must reduce GHG emissions and work towards a low-carbon economy. The low-carbon economy for New Zealand, as defined in this study, is one that trends towards net zero emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), over the next few decades, while also reducing emissions of shorter-lived gases, mainly methane (CH4). Reducing CO2 is particularly important as it stays in the atmosphere for hundreds to thousands of years. Prioritising CO2 emission reductions in the near term is consistent with the authoritative assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concerning the actions needed globally to stabilise the climate and to limit warming to well below 2°C. This study provides a scientific analysis of the complex situation we find ourselves in and what we can best do about it. All New Zealanders need to understand the threats of climate change, accept that we need to change the way we act, realise there are trade-offs that will need to be made, and become personally involved in implementing mitigation solutions. Mitigation is where we take action to either reduce emissions, or support the removal of GHGs from the atmosphere. We have the potential to make the transition to a low-carbon economy within several decades by taking mitigation actions. While this will have costs, it will also bring benefits and opportunities that need to be considered. This study is a first step to enable an open debate around options, choices and time frames. There is very limited publicly available information on what we can and need to do, or the costs and policy options for their implementation now, or later, in individual sectors and across the economy. Such information is critical if we want to have a broad and inclusive debate involving all New Zealanders about how we best make the transition to a low-carbon economy, and the emissions reductions that could be achieved over time (commonly called emissions pathways). Addressing the information gaps so that we can have an informed debate is a very high priority.

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  • A whakapapa of technical, trade and vocational education in Aotearoa, New Zealand : origins of a hybrid VET system

    Maurice-Takerei, Lisa (2016-08-18)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This monograph provides a short history that discusses some of the changes, transformations and tensions from which TVET and in particular trade-related education in New Zealand has arisen. The monograph is part of a broader doctoral thesis, which explores the work of trade tutors in New Zealand polytechnics. The chapter from which the monograph has arisen stems from a desire to better understand the often-opaque environment in which TVET operates in New Zealand.

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  • A Prosthesis and the TPPA

    Cooper, G. (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Kia kaha Europe: Teaching and Learning European Union Law in New Zealand

    Masselot, A. (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Glucose in Well Babies Study - GLOW Study Protocol

    Harris, Deborah; Weston, P; Harding, Jane (2016-09-22)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    Neonatal hypoglycaemia is important because it is common and linked with brain injury and poor neurological outcome. In recent years, there has been considerable interest in the detection and management of neonatal hypoglycaemia. Babies who are identified as being at risk are screened using heel-prick blood tests for the first days after birth. If hypoglycaemia is diagnosed, then treatment is usually provided. Glucose is the primary cerebral fuel and the aim of treatment is to increase the blood glucose concentration to ensure adequate cerebral energy supply. The definition of neonatal hypoglycaemia has caused considerable controversy. The current widely accepted definition of < 2.6mM has been determined using limited, but the only available data. However, the normal glucose profile of healthy appropriately grown term newborns has never been reliably described, and it is possible that many babies are being unnecessarily treated. Babies have been shown to use alternative cerebral fuels, primarily lactate and ketones, but the profiles of blood lactate and ketone concentrations in healthy newborns within the first week are also unclear. We propose a prospective observational cohort study in healthy appropriately grown term newborns to describe the normal glucose, lactate and ketone concentration profiles over the first five postnatal days. Babies enrolled in the study will be cared for as normal newborns, largely by the parents as they progress from hospital or birthing centre to home. Blood samples for analysis of glucose, lactate and ketones will be taken initially from the umbilical artery. Capillary blood tests will then be taken by heel pricks, initially matching the frequency of blood tests taken according current screening protocols for babies born at risk of neonatal hypoglycaemia, and continue for the first five postnatal days. In addition, all babies will have continuous interstitial glucose monitoring. The results of the blood and interstitial glucose measurements will not be available to clinicians caring for the baby. If “neonatal hypoglycaemia” as currently defined is shown to be common in healthy term newborns, it is possible that current clinical management of babies at risk will significantly change.

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  • Eruption of the Universe out of a pre-universe

    Galiyev, Shamil; Galiyev, TS (2016)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    Cosmologists described the history of the entire universe –from the present day all the way back to a fraction of a fraction of a second after the Universe beginning. But many cosmological theories cannot describe the very starting point. Recently, it was suggested to use a model of the single scalar field so that to describe this point and the origin of the Universe from so-called ‘pre-universe’. It is important that recent results from the Planck satellite combined with earlier observations from WMAP, ACT, SPT and other experiments are favour for cosmological models with a single scalar field. Generally speaking, the results are not favour for the current standard model of cosmology combines the origin big bang model and the inflationary scenario. In particular, the standard model does not explain the initial conditions of the Universe. According to the inflation we need just a tiny volume of energy as starting point of the birth of the Universe. However, what produced this energy before the inflation? Here the origin of the Universe is described by a single scalar field (the nonlinear Klein –Gordon equation). Continuous and discontinuous solutions of the equation are presented. These solutions determine landscapes of scalar fields, their potentials and the properties of the pre-universe. An element of the pre-universe which has a form of a multidimensional bubble oscillates in a potential well. A quantum fluctuation tunnels the bubble from this well and the bubble energy increases greatly. New composite scalar field is formed during the tunnelling. The end the tunnelling corresponds to the birth of the Universe. The Universe was born as a result of nonlinear amplification of a quantum fluctuation of the scalar field of the pre-universe. The amplification was of the order times. As a result the bubble energy separated from the pre-universe. A scenario is developed, when the Universe begins from a pre-universe and evolves into a state that differs from initial situations of the theories of the Big Bang and the inflation.

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  • We're catching fish but not value: why QMS needs reform

    Simmons, Glenn; Whittaker, D; Haworth, N (2016-08-29)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Uzzi ( J.D.), Thomson ( J.) The Poems of Catullus. An Annotated Translation. Pp. viii + 224. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. Cased, £39.99, US$69.99. ISBN: 978-1-107-02855-5

    Lewis, Maxine (2016-10)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • An Open Letter to the Minister of Corrections

    Williams, David (2016-07-19)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Women and the academy - why the inequity

    Locke, Kirsten (2016-08-01)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    The under-representation of women in senior academic leadership positions in the academy is a global phenomenon. Recent award winning New Zealand research shows that men graded A and B in the PBRF are three times more likely to be professor than women with the same PBRF grade. The New Zealand university sector, it seems, is no exception to this global trend.

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  • Susan I. Rotroff. Industrial Religion: The Saucer Pyres of the Athenian Agora, Hesperia Supplement 47. Princeton, NJ: American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 2013. Pp. xix + 228. US $75.00. ISBN 9780876615478 [book review]

    Mackay, Elizabeth (2016)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    Review of Susan I. Rotroff. Industrial Religion: The Saucer Pyres of the Athenian Agora, Hesperia Supplement 47. Princeton, NJ: American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 2013. Pp. xix + 228. US $75.00. ISBN 9780876615478

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  • From the president

    Mackay, Elizabeth (2016-04)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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