43 results for Unclassified, 2017

  • Applied practice : theoretical and pedagogical foundations

    Hays, Jay; Helmling, Lisa (2017-04-04)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Applied Practice is an overarching term embracing a wide range of pedagogies that employ one or more forms of work experience for learning, including cooperative education (or co-op), professional practice, internships and apprenticeships, service learning, and many versions of Work-Integrated Learning (WIL). As used here, Applied Practice encompasses the theories, principles, approaches and programs that govern and inform the development of professional practices and practitioners across disciplines, and, in so doing, build individual, organisational, and community capacity to sustainably transform. As this monograph reveals, Applied Practice is a defensible means for building capabilities and dispositions demanded by the complex, global world of the twenty-first century. It achieves this by narrowing the theory–practice divide for which higher education has long been criticised. Narrowing of this gap is made possible by more fully integrating theory and practice, attained through pedagogies that mutually exploit the learning and experiences in academic study and practical work experience. Applied Practice and the various affiliated work experience for learning and Work-Integrated Learning programs are under-theorised and remain under-researched. Herein, the authors draw on a wide range of studies and scholarly literature, and attempt to bring together what can be ascertained with respect to applicable theory and pedagogy. The result of this synthesis is a four-pillar model, each of the four pillars representing a substantial theory stream and important foundation of Applied Practice: Adult Learning Theory (ALT), Experiential Learning Theory (ELT), Transformational Learning Theory (TLT), and Workplace Learning Theory (WLT).

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  • New Lynn – Auckland IMM case study : low-density urban morphology and energy performance optimisation. A new pilot project in Auckland using Integrated Modification Methodology (IMM)

    Tadi, Massimo; Bogunovich, Dushko (2017-04-04)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Integrated Modification Methodology (IMM) has already been applied in established metropolitan contexts, such as Porto Maravilha in Rio de Janeiro, the neighbourhood of Shahrak-e Golestan in Tehran, and Block 39 in New Belgrade. When Unitec Institute of Technology’s Associate Professor of Urban Design Dushko Bogunovich came up with the idea of a comparative analysis of two sprawling metropolitan contexts – Auckland and Milan – he and Massimo Tadi, Director of the IMMdesignlab in Milan and Associate Professor at the School of Architectural Engineering at the Politecnico di Milano, decided to apply IMM to a sample area of low-density suburban Auckland. The project presented in this book was developed in a joint international design workshop organised by Politecnico di Milano, IMMdesignlab and Unitec Institute of Technology. The workshop was held at Politecnico di Milano, Polo Territoriale di Lecco (Italy), from 25–29 May 2015, and the team, comprising 14 international students from different design disciplines, was coordinated by Tadi and Bogunovich, assisted by engineers Hadi Mohammad Zadeh and Frederico Zaniol (IMMdesignlab). The outcomes of the workshop were then further developed by IMMdesignlab to demonstrate how, by adopting IMM, it is possible to retrofit, renovate and reactivate an inefficient and energy consuming neighbourhood into a more integrated and sustainable one.

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  • Walter Klasz : Inbetween

    Klasz, Walter; Mitterer, Wittfrida; Michl, Thomas; Kern, Christian; McPherson, Peter (2017-03-03)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In 2016, Austrian architect and designer Walter Klasz visited Auckland as a Researcher in Residence, hosted by Unitec. Walter’s work focuses on the potential of ‘self-forming-structures’ – constructions that emerge from the tensile and compressive forces that can be manipulated by the designer and the builder. While in New Zealand he was inspired by Polynesian construction and design, by forms found in nature and the landscape, and by his contemporaries working and studying at Unitec. The culmination of his residency was an exhibition at Snowwhite gallery in Auckland, for which Klasz created an accompanying book describing his process, including iterative designs, self-reflection and discussion with friends and colleagues; an autoethnographic account of his time in Auckland. Instead of conducting a blind peer review of Klasz’s book, ePress invited four of his peers to submit an open review, presented here as a discursive foreword to the work. This introductory consideration provides a critical framework to support the manuscript while also acknowledging its place as a reflective account of Klasz’s residency. Open review by: Ass. Prof.Dr. Wittfrida Mitterer, Editor, Bio-Architettura magazine, Italy Dr. Thomas Michl, Lecturer in Art Didactics, Academy of Fine Arts, Nuremberg, Germany Univ. Prof. Arch. Christian Kern, Institute of Three-Dimensional Design, Technical University of Vienna, Austria Peter McPherson, Head of Architecture, Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand This work is a scholarly open review of ‘How far can design be reduced to let form emerge on its own? A review on the research of Architect Walter Klasz in Auckland’ – a booklet from the exhibition at Snowwhite Gallery: Inbetween art and research. Inbetween physical experiments and parametric digital control. (Copyright: Walter Klasz, proofreading: Joe Streibl, Austria) With contributions from Paul Woodruffe, MLA. Artist and Landscape Architect, Department of Design & Contemporary Art, Unitec; Renata Jadresin-Milic, Senior Lecturer, Department of Architecture, Unitec; Sandra Arnet, Academic Leader, Undergraduate, Interior Design/Architecture/Landscape Architecture, Unitec; Marcus Williams, Associate Professor, Dean of Research and Enterprise, Tūāpapa Rangahau, partnering Research and Enterprise, Unitec; Hazel Redpath, Curriculum Developer and Academic Advisor, Unitec.

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  • Ethnic Migrant Media Forum 2014 : curated proceedings. “Are we reaching all New Zealanders?". Exploring the role, benefits, challenges & potential of ethnic media in New Zealand

    Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Kolesova, Elena; Stephenson, Laura (2017-03-03)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    These curated proceedings present what was discussed during the Ethnic Migrant Media Forum, a one-day event hosted by the Department of Communication Studies at Unitec Institute of Technology’s Mt Albert campus in 2014. It is also an attempt to provide an analysis of what was discussed by identifying a number of emerging themes. This publication brings together the curated statements by ethnic media practitioners, academics, and industry representatives involved with ethnic media in New Zealand, presenting a host of issues on ethnic media’s role within the country’s bicultural and multicultural context and organised around the three key themes: 1) Defining ethnic, migrant, diasporic media – what does it mean, who is it, what communities does it represent? 2) Roles and aims of ethnic media – why does ethnic media matter, who does it matter for and what role does ethnic media play in NZ? 3) Impact, challenges and potential – how can ethnic media be used more effectively, what are the challenges and potential? An introductory chapter by forum organisers and this publication’s editors, A/Prof. Evangelia Papoutsaki and Dr Elena Kolesova, presents a background context against which these themes are situated, while Dr Peter Thompson from Victoria University contributes a discussion chapter that brings in a different perspective. Selected information presented by Niche Media at the start of the forum is presented in infographics. Featuring panel discussion highlights and statements from participants, including: Dr Ruth De Souza (keynote address) Dr Arezou Zalipour Dr Camille Nakhid Fezeela Raza Dr Francis Collins David Soh Rene Molina Roshila Prasad Terri Byrne Mary Dawson Carol Hayward Lynda Chanwai-Earle Sue Elliott Mary Lose Dr Prue Cruickshank Rebecca Palmer Stephen Stehlin Taiha Molyneux Sandra Noronha Lisa Taouma Martin Pouwels Hao Peng Naoe Hashimoto Setita Miller Stefan Herrick

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  • Bibliography : Social Work Pertaining to Māori in New Zealand : Ngā Mahi Toko I Te Ora O Te Iwi Māori 1990-2017

    Gilmour KL; Holzke J (2017)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Subject Librarians for the fields of Counselling, Human Services and Social Work are often asked for help with searching for literature related to social work with Māori clients and bicultural social work practice. This bibliography is an attempt to bring together research and literature of interest to social work professionals working with Māori in New Zealand.

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  • MPHS future discussion - a snapshot of MPHS : 2001 and 2013 census and stories and dialogues from MPHS

    Bridgman, Geoffrey (2017-05-10T05:40:15Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    PART 1: Comparison between the 2001 and 2013 Census data ;Population and culture ; Smoking, partners, home ownership ; Religion and qualifications ; Individual income ; Employment and occupation ; Hours of work, travel, volunteering ; Household data size income, rents, vehicle ownership ; The private dwelling ; Conclusion. PART 2: MPHS stories and dialogues Stories: Mae's story : how the Hub opened up a world of possibility Dialogues: The Gangs Neighbours Buses Trains Time The Hub Police, Community Patrols, Wardens

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  • Biosecurity awareness of ferry passengers travelling to islands in the Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand.

    Fraser, Diane; Dabb, H.; Graham, C. (2017-05-10T05:40:23Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Protection of the islands of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park, particularly those that are ‘Pest Free’, from the impacts of invasive organisms is vital for the ongoing management of New Zealand native species. It is well known that the rate and extent of spread of invasive species have primarily been due to human-mediated transport, be this intentional or unintentional. Due to the high residential/commercial/visitor attraction of these islands, there is significant opportunity for the transport of invasive species via private or commercial sea and air craft. This project aims to increase and celebrate passenger awareness of biosecurity risk, increase the understanding of the types of materials transported on ferries and identify some of the commercial sources of these products. Passengers travelling on ferries to primarily Great Barrier and Rakino islands were engaged in conversation to gain an indication of the level of biosecurity awareness of passengers. The results will assist Auckland Council in the strategic management of risk pathways to the islands of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park.

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  • Report on the Banishing Bullying Together projects in McLaren Park / Henderson South

    Bridgman, Geoffrey (2017-05-10T05:40:26Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Te Punanga Haumaru funding supports whanau and community driven action that encourages positive social behaviour in children and young people, and reduces the incidence of bullying. The Violence Free Communities Banishing Bullying Together BBT project in the McLaren Park/Henderson South (MPHS) area aims to: • Strengthen community and network awareness of bullying and engagement in proactive prevention approaches across all aspects of the project • Further develop the use, for younger community members, of performance and art processes which encourage positive and rich identity formation, group collaboration and the development of conflict resolution and leadership skills • Coordinate, through local community exploration of their needs and resources, a series of projects, run by community champions, that aim to improve the quality of life of the community • Create opportunities to influence how bullying is understood and responded to in social media Activities will include: • Hosting community events such as Pink Shirt Day, Our Amazing Place (OAP), SPEAK that connect whanau to services and project activities • Continued ROOTZ, Project Respect and Legacy workshops and the Mark-it-Up art project enabling young people to put their experiences and solutions to bullying into performances and art shared with the public. • Inspiring conversations in work places, churches and sports organisations about bullying prevention (Pink Shirt Day, Mark-it-Up) • Providing facilitation training around leadership and conflict resolution. • Utilising local celebrities as connectors and role models (SPEAK) • Positive social media work (Violence Free Communities, BBT and OAP websites and Facebook pages, Neighbourly) • Resources and tools such as the Bystander Guide to Banishing Bullying, OAP resources: The 2014-2015 BBT project builds on the previous year’s work of the same name also funded by Te Punanga Hamaru. The emphasis in this year’s programme shifted away from awareness building to building both individual and community capacity to prevent bullying. This was driven, in part, by our experience of building awareness and by an analysis of the drivers of bullying. For example, one of the most successful awareness projects last year was the stall that we ran as part of the OAP event. The stall was at the end of an alleyway that had pinned up a number quotes on A2 laminated posters from some residents about their fear of alleyways and, generally, of walking around their community and from other residents who weren’t fearful and wanted to engage with their community. Everyone who came along the alleyway wanted to discuss what they’d read and consider how they felt about the safety of their community and what coned be done to improve it. These were richer conversations with residents about a very important aspect of bullying (being safe in the street) that we were able to have than with events like Dinner with Difference (a community discussion event) or the community feedback sessions from the in-depth interviews we did last year. What it told us is that communication with residents has to be on their turf and in a way that means they can directly engage with the issues and, hopefully, take action.

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  • Healthy Deaf Mind Seminar Series. Feedback summary and analysis. Coalition of Deaf Mental Health Professionals, Auckland.

    Bridgman, Geoffrey; Sainsbury, C. (2017-05-10T05:40:26Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The Healthy Deaf Minds Aotearoa conference took place in Auckland (20th), Wellington (24th) and Christchurch (30th) in November 2015. 196 people attended across the 3 venues including a small group of CDMHP members who ran the events, and helped to facilitate 2 panel sessions. THIS REPORT This report provides a brief overview of conference, and presents a summary of attendees feedback, gathered via feedback forms, which were distributed and completed on the day, and 2 facilitated panel sessions. The feedback form was designed by conference hosts CDMHP to elicit delegates perspectives on the value of the day, areas where they would like further information, and priorities for Deaf mental health service development. A questionnaire from Dr Brendan Monteiro’s (the guest speaker) work place, St Georges Healthcare, in the UK was also distributed to gauge attendees views on the relevance, quality, and delivery of his presentations. The rating scales used to measure attendees understanding of each topic before and after each presentation have been included in this report. WHAT WAS HEALTHY DEAF MINDS AOTEAROA ABOUT? The principle aim of conference was to provide the opportunity for attendees to come together and learn about the needs of Deaf people with mental health needs, and more specifically, in the criminal justice system. Exploration of Deaf development, mental illness and recovery in the Deaf world context provided a shared learning platform through which Deaf people, practitioners and service commissioners could develop their respective knowledge. The importance of culture and communication in attaining positive treatment outcomes was a central theme throughout the day.

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  • Middle leaders matter. White paper

    Robson, J.; Bassett, Martin (2017-05-16T14:30:02Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Middle leaders in Aotearoa New Zealand schools hold a pivotal role in leading the teaching and learning activities that determine the success of educational outcomes (Ministry of Education, 2012). Most middle leaders find their role rewarding, however, they experience the tension of being both teacher and leader. Although middle leaders have influential positions within schools, they are often not provided with specific middle leadership development, nor effective appraisal to undertake this complex role. Recent literature supports the need for middle leadership development and meaningful appraisal. In the absence of a government initiative, the onus falls on school leaders to develop and appraise their middle leaders, yet middle leaders believe it is not happening adequately (Bassett, 2016, Cardno & Robson, 2016). This white paper presents a case for an online course specifically designed for middle leaders. The online course offers a solution to the problem, and aims to explore the fundamental elements of middle leadership, from understanding the role itself, and leading teams, through to leading from the middle, and connecting communities of leaders across schools.

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  • Eruption of matter, dark energy and the Universe from a pre-universe

    Galiev, SU; Galiyev, TS (2017)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    The origin of the Universe is being studied as an jump of an initial scalar field from a pre-universe. The scalar field is described by a cubic nonlinear multidimensional Klein-Gordon equation. The approximate solutions are presented. They describe scalar fields, scalar potentials and a weakly oscillating pre-Universe. At any moment the pre-Universe gives a birth to the billions of ???seeds??? of rapidly evolving Universes. One of them accidentally formed our Universe during some quantum action. The strongly-nonlinear model of the eruption of the Universe from the pre-universe is developed in which all elements fit together in a tight and natural way. The origin of the particles, matter and dark energy is directly related to the strongly-nonlinear properties of the quantum scalar fields and the resonant interaction and oscillations of them. The initial energy of the field is converted into particles during the eruption. They could work like a scaffold creating the four-dimensional spacetime. Some highly energetic particles could be very stable. Perhaps, these particles had been stable for billions of years before they begun to decay. This process can determine the law of expansion the modern Universe. On the other hand, these particles may correspond to the dark matter. However, the bulk of the initial energy remained unused. Perhaps, this energy was locked into the formed four-dimensional spacetime. This energy may correspond to the dark energy. The Universe is considered as a wave system. A scenario is developed, when the Universe begins in a state that differs greatly from that of the theories of the Big Bang and the inflation. The Universe was born having a finite volume. We believe that the coherent model for the emergence and initial evolution of the Universe is presented.

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  • ???Elastica???-like waves and particles: from Bernoulli, Euler, Laplace and Faraday to the eruption of the Universe

    Galiev, SU; Galiyev, TS (2017)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    An information about ???elastika???-forms is presented. These forms have been mathematically described by Euler in the middle of the 18th century. Some of these forms correspond to the strongly-nonlinear waves propagating in different media. Examples of wave equations describing elastica-like waves are presented. Special attention is given to the nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation. The exact and approximate solutions to this equation are constructed. These solutions describe some elastica-like travelling waves. They can also describe a formation of strongly-localized wave objects in some resonators. It is stressed that these objects (particles, bubbles) can occur during the origin of the Universe and affect its subsequent evolution.

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  • Report on biosecurity advocacy on ferries in the Hauraki Gulf, Jan/Feb 2015

    Tood, T.; Fraser, Diane (2017-07-11T00:14:18Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The Hauraki Gulf marine park is one of New Zealand’s national treasures. It brings many aesthetic,environmental,social and economic values to the Auckland Region and New Zealand.The Hauraki Gulf Marine Park has been the fruition of many years work by the Auckland Council and Department of Conservation collaborating in the Treasure Islands initiative. . Considerable ongoing effort is been made to create as many of these islands as possible as 'Pest-free' habitats for New Zealand endangered native species ( Auckland Council, Department of Conservation & Hauraki Gulf Marine Park, 2015) . However, as most of these islands can be accessed freely by private vessels and public ferries, maintaining this pest -free status and the high standard of values of the Hauraki Gulf Islands is difficult due to the high risk of introduction or re-introduction of a range of invasive species (Auckland Council, Department of Conservation & Hauraki Gulf Marine Park, 2015) . The Treasure Islands initiative is a mechanism for education of the public about the value of the islands of the Hauraki Gulf as well as providing information and actions as to how the public can contribute to this cause by checking for stowaways and, therefore, reducing the risk of transport of invasive species to islands. As such, the effectiveness of the communication in the Treasure Islands advocacy role is essential for the success of this initiative to allow the dissemination of knowledge to the public in a manner that will stimulate a change in their behaviour by checking for pest species before travelling to the islands. In a study by Tyrell (2012), it would appear that public awareness of biosecurity risks and knowledge of preventative actions had risen in Auckland residents since the previous survey in 2009/2010. It was suggested in this study that this increase in awareness was due to the advocacy efforts implemented under the Treasure Islands campaign. Therefore, the need to continue this advocacy role is vital for the future protection of the islands of the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park as well as public awareness of the collaboration and conservation initiatives of Auckland Council and the Department of Conservation.

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  • Dataset for: Southern Hemisphere bog persists as a strong carbon sink during droughts

    Goodrich, Jordan Paul; Campbell, David I.; Schipper, Louis A. (2017)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Main article is available online at https://hdl.handle.net/10289/11373

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  • Public equity and tax-benefit reform

    Rankin, Keith (2017-12-13)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In this report Keith Rankin, economist at Unitec Institute of Technology, outlines an alternative approach to public accounting, deriving from principles of public equity. He argues for reframing our current system of taxes and benefits as a system of pooling and distributing revenues attributable to public capitals, such as the intellectual and social capital that have built up over time. This reframing process helps us to see that a more equitable system of public revenue distribution can be developed, in stages, as detailed in this report. Keith shows that, at present, a 33 percent income tax can fund a universal payment of $175 per week to every adult meeting economic citizenship criteria. Keith’s previous work on this topic has been published in Social Policy Journal of New Zealand (1997, 1998), Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare (2016), and in multi‑authored books Basic Income Worldwide: Horizons of Reform (2012) and Basic Income in Australia and New Zealand (2016). .

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  • Classic Book Review: Re-reading Deleuze and Guattari???s A Thousand Plateaus

    Pringle, R; Landi, Dillon (2017)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Seismic Discussion Paper

    Potangaroa, R. (2017-07-11T00:14:10Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    There does not appear to have been any seismic guidelines despite the obvious seismic character of Afghanistan. The seismic measures that are being used seem to be of unknown heritage and perhaps of questionable value and hence this discussion paper is to offer a rationalization of seismic design options available to agencies. The focus is for the typical one storey mud/brick house currently in use by agencies and the guidance and recommendations are with this typology in mind.

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  • An assessment of risk pathways for the spread of Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) and rainbow skinks (Lampropholis delicata) by commercial businesses in the eastern Rodney district, New Zealand to the islands of the Hauraki Gulf.

    Dabb, H.; Gibbons., R; Fraser, Diane (2017-07-11T00:14:12Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The Hauraki Gulf Marine Park encompasses an area of over one million hectares and includes a group of islands, some of which are classified as ‘pest-free’ (Department of Conservation, DOC, n.d.). Due to historical, ecological, cultural and economic value of these islands, significant effort is being made to protect these islands from the impacts of invasive species (DOC, n.d.). The negative effects of invasive species on native species and ecosystems may include ecosystem alteration, interspecific competition, predation, and disease transmission (Peace, 2004). Invasive species are a threat to current conservation of the Hauraki Gulf Islands and are spread both intentionally and unintentionally by human mediated dispersal (Humle, 2009). Two species in particular that are of increasing risk to the islands are the Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) and rainbow (or Plague) skink (Lampropholis delicata). Note that this is a preliminary report and final reports will be available by the end of 2015.

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  • Fix our future. We have the tools. Let's use them. Survey report: prepared for Generation Zero.

    Dodson, Giles; Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2017-07-11T00:14:13Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    OBJECTIVE: This paper presents findings from a 2014 membership survey of Generation Zero, a youth-led climate change activist organization, in existence since 2010. The survey was conducted as part of the Generation Zero: online activism in NZ research project. FINDINGS The research finds that Generation Zero’s membership is very significantly homogenous, across several demographic indicators, such as geographic location, age, socio-economic class and political preference. As expected, the data shows the Generation Zero membership is politically engaged and highly supportive of pro-climate policies and rhetoric. RECOMMENDATIONS If Generation Zero seeks wider engagement and participation beyond a highly engaged, homogenous and activist core, to deepen public engagement with issues of climate politics and communication, and to achieve change in these areas, broadening the appeal of the organisation to diverse membership may be required. The analysis of the findings offers some preliminary insights in this regard. Multivariate regression analysis indicates several opportunities for Generation Zero to shape its campaigns and communication towards a more diverse membership, primarily among supporters of centrist political parties

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  • Move, Act, Play, Sing (MAPS) : exploring early childhood arts teaching and learning strategies and concepts through community arts interventions.

    Lines, D.; Naughton, C.; Roder, J.; Matapo, Jacoba; Whyte, M.; Liao, T. (2017-07-11T00:14:12Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This research narrative tells the story of a Māori immersion early childhood centre’s engagement with the performing arts. In this research, and fundamental to this narrative is the provocation that came from the drama based Community Artist who, joining the centre,listened, shared, planned and lived drama arts practices with the children and teachers. This activity rests within a more extended arts based teaching and research learning initiative (TRLI) known as Move, Act, Play, Sing (MAPS), which also involved provocations from music and dance Community Artists . Drama and storytelling are the focus of the encounters shared here, particularly what might be understood as a ‘walking performance’ linked to a local mountain,which featured in the children’s lives and the life of the centre becoming-Māori. What emerged throughout the overall project was an affirmation of the intricate ties to lived experiences, sensations, encounters, interactions and intensities that are present in children’s work. Drama as ‘real’ or living is supported within the imaginary, where Deleuze identifies ‘real’ as both virtual and the actual (1988). Attention is drawn to the movement or leakage between virtual and the actual, enabling another of Deleuze’s concepts to operate, namely, the rhizome (Sellers, 2013). This research also draws on Deleuze and Guattari’s (1988) concept of assemblages of desire invoking the imaginary as a new means of expression affecting unexpected relations and connections, and it is within these emergent, unexpected, yet still anticipated potentials that this article seeks new possibilities for drama in early childhood education.

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