597 results for Unclassified

  • Where to next for our sinking city? Opinion piece in the Christchurch Press, 15th August 2014

    Quigley, M.C.; Hughes, M.W. (2014)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    OPINION: Associate Professor MARK QUIGLEY, from the University of Canterbury's department of geological sciences, and Dr MATTHEW HUGHES, from its department of civil and natural resources engineering, survey the changing landscape of post-quake Christchurch.

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  • Review: Bowlby 25th Annivesary Memorial conference

    Dorahy, M.J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Hikaru Yamashita, Humanitarian Space and International Politics: The Creation of Safe Areas (Aldershot, UK: Ashgate Publishing, 2004)

    Moses, Jeremy (2008)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Book review

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  • Applied practice : theoretical and pedagogical foundations

    Hays, Jay; Helmling, Lisa (2017-04-04)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Applied Practice is an overarching term embracing a wide range of pedagogies that employ one or more forms of work experience for learning, including cooperative education (or co-op), professional practice, internships and apprenticeships, service learning, and many versions of Work-Integrated Learning (WIL). As used here, Applied Practice encompasses the theories, principles, approaches and programs that govern and inform the development of professional practices and practitioners across disciplines, and, in so doing, build individual, organisational, and community capacity to sustainably transform. As this monograph reveals, Applied Practice is a defensible means for building capabilities and dispositions demanded by the complex, global world of the twenty-first century. It achieves this by narrowing the theory–practice divide for which higher education has long been criticised. Narrowing of this gap is made possible by more fully integrating theory and practice, attained through pedagogies that mutually exploit the learning and experiences in academic study and practical work experience. Applied Practice and the various affiliated work experience for learning and Work-Integrated Learning programs are under-theorised and remain under-researched. Herein, the authors draw on a wide range of studies and scholarly literature, and attempt to bring together what can be ascertained with respect to applicable theory and pedagogy. The result of this synthesis is a four-pillar model, each of the four pillars representing a substantial theory stream and important foundation of Applied Practice: Adult Learning Theory (ALT), Experiential Learning Theory (ELT), Transformational Learning Theory (TLT), and Workplace Learning Theory (WLT).

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  • New Lynn – Auckland IMM case study : low-density urban morphology and energy performance optimisation. A new pilot project in Auckland using Integrated Modification Methodology (IMM)

    Tadi, Massimo; Bogunovich, Dushko (2017-04-04)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Integrated Modification Methodology (IMM) has already been applied in established metropolitan contexts, such as Porto Maravilha in Rio de Janeiro, the neighbourhood of Shahrak-e Golestan in Tehran, and Block 39 in New Belgrade. When Unitec Institute of Technology’s Associate Professor of Urban Design Dushko Bogunovich came up with the idea of a comparative analysis of two sprawling metropolitan contexts – Auckland and Milan – he and Massimo Tadi, Director of the IMMdesignlab in Milan and Associate Professor at the School of Architectural Engineering at the Politecnico di Milano, decided to apply IMM to a sample area of low-density suburban Auckland. The project presented in this book was developed in a joint international design workshop organised by Politecnico di Milano, IMMdesignlab and Unitec Institute of Technology. The workshop was held at Politecnico di Milano, Polo Territoriale di Lecco (Italy), from 25–29 May 2015, and the team, comprising 14 international students from different design disciplines, was coordinated by Tadi and Bogunovich, assisted by engineers Hadi Mohammad Zadeh and Frederico Zaniol (IMMdesignlab). The outcomes of the workshop were then further developed by IMMdesignlab to demonstrate how, by adopting IMM, it is possible to retrofit, renovate and reactivate an inefficient and energy consuming neighbourhood into a more integrated and sustainable one.

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  • Walter Klasz : Inbetween

    Klasz, Walter; Mitterer, Wittfrida; Michl, Thomas; Kern, Christian; McPherson, Peter (2017-03-03)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In 2016, Austrian architect and designer Walter Klasz visited Auckland as a Researcher in Residence, hosted by Unitec. Walter’s work focuses on the potential of ‘self-forming-structures’ – constructions that emerge from the tensile and compressive forces that can be manipulated by the designer and the builder. While in New Zealand he was inspired by Polynesian construction and design, by forms found in nature and the landscape, and by his contemporaries working and studying at Unitec. The culmination of his residency was an exhibition at Snowwhite gallery in Auckland, for which Klasz created an accompanying book describing his process, including iterative designs, self-reflection and discussion with friends and colleagues; an autoethnographic account of his time in Auckland. Instead of conducting a blind peer review of Klasz’s book, ePress invited four of his peers to submit an open review, presented here as a discursive foreword to the work. This introductory consideration provides a critical framework to support the manuscript while also acknowledging its place as a reflective account of Klasz’s residency. Open review by: Ass. Prof.Dr. Wittfrida Mitterer, Editor, Bio-Architettura magazine, Italy Dr. Thomas Michl, Lecturer in Art Didactics, Academy of Fine Arts, Nuremberg, Germany Univ. Prof. Arch. Christian Kern, Institute of Three-Dimensional Design, Technical University of Vienna, Austria Peter McPherson, Head of Architecture, Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand This work is a scholarly open review of ‘How far can design be reduced to let form emerge on its own? A review on the research of Architect Walter Klasz in Auckland’ – a booklet from the exhibition at Snowwhite Gallery: Inbetween art and research. Inbetween physical experiments and parametric digital control. (Copyright: Walter Klasz, proofreading: Joe Streibl, Austria) With contributions from Paul Woodruffe, MLA. Artist and Landscape Architect, Department of Design & Contemporary Art, Unitec; Renata Jadresin-Milic, Senior Lecturer, Department of Architecture, Unitec; Sandra Arnet, Academic Leader, Undergraduate, Interior Design/Architecture/Landscape Architecture, Unitec; Marcus Williams, Associate Professor, Dean of Research and Enterprise, Tūāpapa Rangahau, partnering Research and Enterprise, Unitec; Hazel Redpath, Curriculum Developer and Academic Advisor, Unitec.

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  • Submission to the Parliamentary Select Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade on the New Zealand Intelligence and Security Bill

    Small, D. (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Submission to Parliamentary Select Committee on Education and Science on Education Amendment Bill (No 2)

    Small, D. (2014)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Ethnic Migrant Media Forum 2014 : curated proceedings. “Are we reaching all New Zealanders?". Exploring the role, benefits, challenges & potential of ethnic media in New Zealand

    Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Kolesova, Elena; Stephenson, Laura (2017-03-03)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    These curated proceedings present what was discussed during the Ethnic Migrant Media Forum, a one-day event hosted by the Department of Communication Studies at Unitec Institute of Technology’s Mt Albert campus in 2014. It is also an attempt to provide an analysis of what was discussed by identifying a number of emerging themes. This publication brings together the curated statements by ethnic media practitioners, academics, and industry representatives involved with ethnic media in New Zealand, presenting a host of issues on ethnic media’s role within the country’s bicultural and multicultural context and organised around the three key themes: 1) Defining ethnic, migrant, diasporic media – what does it mean, who is it, what communities does it represent? 2) Roles and aims of ethnic media – why does ethnic media matter, who does it matter for and what role does ethnic media play in NZ? 3) Impact, challenges and potential – how can ethnic media be used more effectively, what are the challenges and potential? An introductory chapter by forum organisers and this publication’s editors, A/Prof. Evangelia Papoutsaki and Dr Elena Kolesova, presents a background context against which these themes are situated, while Dr Peter Thompson from Victoria University contributes a discussion chapter that brings in a different perspective. Selected information presented by Niche Media at the start of the forum is presented in infographics. Featuring panel discussion highlights and statements from participants, including: Dr Ruth De Souza (keynote address) Dr Arezou Zalipour Dr Camille Nakhid Fezeela Raza Dr Francis Collins David Soh Rene Molina Roshila Prasad Terri Byrne Mary Dawson Carol Hayward Lynda Chanwai-Earle Sue Elliott Mary Lose Dr Prue Cruickshank Rebecca Palmer Stephen Stehlin Taiha Molyneux Sandra Noronha Lisa Taouma Martin Pouwels Hao Peng Naoe Hashimoto Setita Miller Stefan Herrick

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  • The absent elephant in the 2016 : Modernising Child Youth and Family Expert Panel Report

    Kenkel, David (2016-04)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Sometimes the most interesting thing about a new policy document or report is not what is present in the document but what is absent. On receiving the report Investing in New Zealand’s Children and Their Families I used the very simple textual analysis technique of searching for the frequency of what I considered important words. Such a simple analysis does not necessarily create a window into the minds and thinking of the authors; however it does give some indications about what they consider important at least as measured by how frequently they talk about it.

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  • They are the elements in the room but only very briefly

    Hartshorn, R.M. (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Chemistry made it into the mainstream news last week, following the announcement from the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) that four new elements have been discovered. So is this a big deal and what does it really mean? Well, like many things, the answer is that it depends on who you are and what you care about. But apart from anything else, in the complete history of human activity we have (now) found only 118 elements, so discovering one, let alone four, is a rare and remarkable event.

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  • Richard Caplan, International Governance of War-Torn Territories: Rule and Reconstruction (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006),291 pp.

    Moses, J. (2008)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    With the limited acceptance of the ‘responsibility to protect’ at the 2005 UN World Summit, it appears that the exercise of humanitarian intervention – and the related peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations that follow – will remain a feature of international politics for the forseeable future. With this in mind, Richard Caplan’s well organised analysis of the successes and failures of recent post-conflict ‘transitional administrations’ – in Eastern Slavonia, Bosnia, Kosovo, and East Timor – that have been managed by international authorities is a useful text for practitioners and scholars alike.

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  • Walter Laqueur (ed.), Voices of Terror: Manifestos, Writings, and Manuals of Al Qaeda, Hamas, and Other Terrorists from Around the World and Throughout the Ages (New York: Reed Press, 2004), 520 pp.

    Moses, J. (2006)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Bibliography : Social Work Pertaining to Māori in New Zealand : Ngā Mahi Toko I Te Ora O Te Iwi Māori 1990-2017

    Gilmour KL; Holzke J (2017)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Subject Librarians for the fields of Counselling, Human Services and Social Work are often asked for help with searching for literature related to social work with Māori clients and bicultural social work practice. This bibliography is an attempt to bring together research and literature of interest to social work professionals working with Māori in New Zealand.

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  • Using citizen science for coastal data collection

    Orchard, Shane (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Coastal News, 62, 3-4.

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  • Supporting your practice

    McChesney, J.; Wilson, S. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Thesis review : the role of SANZ, a migrant radio programme, in making sense of place for South African migrants in New Zealand

    Meadows, Michael (2016-11-15)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This study is a detailed, qualitative exploration of the role played by a South African migrant radio programme, SANZ Live, in supporting its audience to create a sense of place in Auckland, New Zealand, through a range of on- and off-air activities. The thesis concludes that SANZ Live contributes to the creation of opportunities for South African migrants to find a sense of place through producing media content, participating in face-to-face communication through the off-air activities of SANZ Live, participating in SANZ Live social media and perpetuating aspects of South African culture through various programme-related activities. This multi-layered participation works to establish a new routine and a hybrid culture that enables South African migrants to establish new individual, group and collective identities – establish new individual, group and collective identities – becoming ‘South African Kiwis’ – in their new home of choice.

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  • Transition to a low-carbon economy for New Zealand

    Sims, Ralph; Barton, Barry; Bennett, Paul; Isaacs, Nigel; Kerr, Suzi; Leaver, Jonathan; Reisinger, Andy; Stephenson, Janet (2016-04)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The problem The climate is changing. Average temperatures are increasing due to human activity, which has driven increasingly high levels of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 2015 Paris Climate Agreement adopted by 195 countries has the goal that the world will limit the increase in global temperature to well below 2 degrees Celsius (2 degrees C) above pre-industrial levels, and will pursue efforts to limit the increase to below 1.5 degrees C. Global GHG emissions continue to rise and under current trends, the world is heading towards a global 3–4 degrees C temperature rise. This will result in negative impacts on the global economy and significantly increase the risks from climate change through rising temperatures, accelerated sea level rise, changes in rainfall patterns, more frequent extreme weather events, and higher costs to adapt or protect ourselves and our infrastructure. We will need our economy to become more resilient. In order to limit temperature rise, we must reduce GHG emissions and work towards a low-carbon economy. The low-carbon economy for New Zealand, as defined in this study, is one that trends towards net zero emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), over the next few decades, while also reducing emissions of shorter-lived gases, mainly methane (CH4). Reducing CO2 is particularly important as it stays in the atmosphere for hundreds to thousands of years. Prioritising CO2 emission reductions in the near term is consistent with the authoritative assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concerning the actions needed globally to stabilise the climate and to limit warming to well below 2°C. This study provides a scientific analysis of the complex situation we find ourselves in and what we can best do about it. All New Zealanders need to understand the threats of climate change, accept that we need to change the way we act, realise there are trade-offs that will need to be made, and become personally involved in implementing mitigation solutions. Mitigation is where we take action to either reduce emissions, or support the removal of GHGs from the atmosphere. We have the potential to make the transition to a low-carbon economy within several decades by taking mitigation actions. While this will have costs, it will also bring benefits and opportunities that need to be considered. This study is a first step to enable an open debate around options, choices and time frames. There is very limited publicly available information on what we can and need to do, or the costs and policy options for their implementation now, or later, in individual sectors and across the economy. Such information is critical if we want to have a broad and inclusive debate involving all New Zealanders about how we best make the transition to a low-carbon economy, and the emissions reductions that could be achieved over time (commonly called emissions pathways). Addressing the information gaps so that we can have an informed debate is a very high priority.

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  • High Risks for Fiji Divers in Pacific Documentary 'Disturbing'

    Milligan, C

    Unclassified
    Auckland University of Technology

    This is a report from the Pacific International Documentary Festival 2016, held in Tahiti in January/February 2016. It discusses the festival and focuses on how documentary can draw attention to political issues in the Pacific, centring on the film 'Les Salaires des Profondeurs', a film which shows the lives and suffering of deep-sea divers working in Fiji. http://asiapacificreport.nz/2016/03/06/high-risks-for-fiji-fishermen-in-pacific-documentary-disturbing

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  • List of Qualitas Code Corpus Programs used for Encapsulation Research.

    Voigt, Janina; Irwin, Warwick; Churcher, Neville (2010)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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