660 results for Unclassified

  • South Kaipara Community Economic Development Scheme : evaluation and economic impact. A report in the South Kaipara Community economic Development scheme [Commissioned by Helensville District Health Trust and funded by Department of internal Affairs and Metro ITP]

    Prescott, James; Jeffs, Lindsay; Stansfield, John (2018-03-30T13:30:01Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This is an Evaluation and Economic Impact Analysis Report prepared for the South Kaipara Community Economic Development Scheme (SKCEDS). The report will focus on the economic and socio-economic impact of the scheme from the perspective of the South Kaipara Community as well as reflections on the learnings from the process and potential prospects. Given the intent of the project, the following impact measures are included; Regional Economic Development, Employment, Education, Wages and Salaries and Government Taxation revenues and expenditures.

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  • The Organisational Context of Human Service Practice

    Webster, Michael (2015)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Native Land Court, Volume 2, 1888???1909: A Historical Study, Cases and Commentary. By Richard Boast [Book review]

    Laurie, John (2016)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    Review of The Native Land Court, Volume 2, 1888???1909: A Historical Study, Cases and Commentary. By Richard Boast. Thomson Reuters, Wellington, 2015. 1146pp. NZ price: $246. ISBN: 9780864729217.

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  • 5 for '14: 2014 General Election priorities

    Gay Men's Sexual Health research group; Saxton, Peter; Ludlam, Adrian (2014-08-27)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    These are GMSH???s five priorities for the 2014 general election ??? "5 for ???14" - to improve the sexual health of gay and bisexual men in New Zealand. Although it focusses on gay and bisexual men, many priorities are relevant to the health of the broader gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and intersex (GLBTI) population. 1. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination should be publicly funded for gay and bisexual males 2. District Health Boards should expand free and comprehensive specialist sexual health services 3. More General Practices should offer safe, relevant and appropriate care for GLBTI individuals 4. Government Official Statistics should routinely collect and report data on the health of GLBTI 5. Sexual health and HIV policy framework should be strengthened

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  • State of Te Reo Maori today

    Ngaha, Arapera (2010-09-19)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    An interview on air about Te Reo Maori revitalisation

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  • HPV in gay men: preventable but not yet prevented

    Saxton, Peter; Ludlam, Adrian (2014-05-21)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Snapshots: Gay Auckland Periodic Sex Survey 2014

    Saxton, Peter; Ludlam, Adrian (2015-02-05)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Submission to the Select Committee on Health: Public Health (Protection) Amendment Bill

    Saxton, Peter; Ludlam, Adrian (2015-02-13)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Te Matapunenga: A compendium of references to the concepts and institutions of Maori customary law [Book review]

    Erueti, Andrew (2016-04)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Submission to the Parliamentary Select Committee on Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade on Countering Terrorist Fighters Legislation Bill

    Small DT (2014)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Submission to the Health Committee Inquiry into Preventing Child Abuse and Improving Children's Health Outcomes

    Small DT (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Liquidity Constraints, Home Equity and Residential Mortgage Losses

    Do, XH; Roesch, D; Scheule, H

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    This paper analyses how borrower liquidity constraints and home equity relate to the realized loss given default (LGD) using the quarterly U.S. residential mortgage loan-level data observed from Q2 2005 to Q1 2015. We define defaulted loans with zero-LGD as cure loans and those with non-zero LGD as non-cure loans. We find robust evidence that the borrower liquidity constraints and positive equity are explaining cure, while negative equity explains non-zero loss. However, a relationship between borrower liquidity constraints and the non-zero LGD is not economically meaningful. Our findings support to separate cure and non-cure loans in mortgage loss risk models.

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  • Monitoring terrestrial bird populations on Tiritiri Matangi Island, Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand, 1987-2010

    Graham, Mike; Veitch, Dick; Aguilar, Glenn; Galbraith, Mel (2013-11-18)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Tiritiri Matangi Island is a Scientific Reserve located in the Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand. In 1986, two years after the start of a ten-year planting programme on the island, members of the Ornithological Society of New Zealand, Auckland, began a monitoring programme of the bird populations. A biannual survey scheme commenced in April 1987, counting birds on predetermined transects and at listening posts. This paper focuses on the spring dataset (November) to provide an overview of changes in relative abundance of birds from 1987 to 2010. Over this time, a revegetation programme, the successful translocation of 11 native bird species to the island and eradication of kiore (Pacific rat Rattus exulans) have altered the dynamics of the environment. Overall, an increase in indigenous avian biodiversity and abundance was recorded, although the increase was dominated by two species, the tui (Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae) and bellbird (Anthornis melanura). Substantial increases in population abundance were observed in the translocated species recorded in the counts. Exotic species and common forest passerines (fantail Rhipidura fuliginosa, grey warbler Gerygone igata, silvereye Zosterops lateralis) declined. Some of the possible reasons for these changes are discussed.

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  • Stockpiling pupils' data jars with right to privacy

    Small DT (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Book review: What can behavioral economics teach us about teaching economics?

    Lippert, Steffen (2016-10)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • On the foreigner

    Arndt, Sonja Kathrina (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Who is ‘the foreigner’? What does it mean, to be a foreigner, and how does foreignness feel, look, or smell? A concrete definition of the foreigner would perhaps belie the very term, so I attempt here to illustrate the notion, calling forth some conceptions, within and around which each of us must continually construct an understanding of foreignness, for ourselves and for those around us. According to the Oxford Dictionary (Oxford Dictionaries, 2015), a foreigner is a person coming from another country, who does not belong to a particular place or group, a stranger, an outsider. Julia Kristeva (1991), in her book Strangers to ourselves, elaborates on these ideas, and says that the foreigner can cause “a choked up rage deep down in my throat”, and be seen as “a black angel clouding transparency” (p. 1). Following this view, the foreigner, stranger, outsider that comes from a very different place, could be seen as someone who causes an unwanted disturbance, or anxiety, in our everyday comfort and routine. While Kristeva’s conception is laden with emotion, both notions identify a foreigner as somebody unfamiliar, unpredictable. The foreigner then, is a stranger, an unknown, an Other.

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  • Pest Fish Control - Fact Sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Collier, Kevin J.; Hicks, Brendan J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Due to their negative impacts on water quality and native biodiversity in New Zealand, regional councils have included a number of introduced freshwater fish species such as koi carp, rudd, brown bullhead catfish, goldfish, tench, gambusia (mosquitofish) and European perch (Figure 1) in their pest management plans. The Department of Conservation and regional councils undertake control and eradication programmes around New Zealand every year in order to contain their spread and reduce their impacts. Nearly all regions of mainland New Zealand have at least one of these species but they are most prevalent in the Auckland and Waikato regions. LERNZ has been researching the population ecology and capture methods of pest fish populations in order to develop efficient methods for their control.

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  • New Zealand pest fish species: Koi carp and Gambusia – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    New Zealand has a total of about 36 native freshwater fish species, and a further 22 (39% of all freshwater fish) have been introduced from overseas. Like all introduced species, they have some impact on New Zealand's native ecosystems, but some cause more problems than others.

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  • Flocculation and sediment capping – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Paul, Wendy J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Sediment capping and flocculation are in-lake techniques designed to reduce internal nutrient loads from the bottom sediments of lakes. These loads are roughly equivalent in magnitude to external loads. Case studies of the Rotorua lakes (Figure 1) show that with careful design and management, sediment capping and flocculation can reduce nutrient concentrations and the likelihood of algal blooms. Relevant actions can include: (i) reducing bioavailable phosphorus in stream inflows through continuous addition of the active material to the stream, (ii) removing bioavailable phosphorus, and flocculation and sedimentation of nutrients, and (iii) altering sediment composition so that nutrients are more efficiently retained within the bottom sediments

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  • Exclusion and removal of pest fish from Lake Ohinewai – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Ling, Nicholas; Daniel, Adam Joshua (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Many of the shallow lakes in the lower Waikato River floodplain have significantly degraded water quality as a result of nutrient and sediment enrichment from non-point sources. Pest fish species such as koi carp, goldfish, and catfish have exacerbated lake decline by resuspending lake sediments and uprooting submerged macrophytes. This this resulted in a collapse of submerged macrophytes and progression from clear-water oligotrophic state to a eutrophic (algal-dominated) state.

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