612 results for Unclassified

  • Reducing beam hardening effects and metal artefacts in spectral CT using Medipix3RX

    Rajendran, K; Walsh, M. F.; de Ruiter, N. J. A.; Chernoglazov, A. I.; Panta, R. K.; Butler, P. H.; Bell, S. T.; Woodfield, T. B. F.; Tredinnick, J.; Healy, J. L.; Bateman, C. J.; Aamir, R.; Doesburg, R. M. N.; Renaud, P. F.; Gieseg, S. P.; Smithies, D. J.; Mohr, J. L.; Mandalika, V. B. H.; Opie, A. M. T.; Cook, N. J.; Ronaldson, J. P.; Nik, S. J.; Atharifard, A.; Clyne, M.; Bones, P. J.; Bartneck, C.; Grasset, R.; Schleich, N.; Billinghurst, M.; Butler, A. P. H.; Anderson, N. G. (2014-02-05)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    DICOM Raw Data, with explanatory text files.

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  • The post-auricular muscle reflex (PAMR): Its detection, analysis, and use as an objective hearing test

    O'Beirne, G.A. (1998)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    A number of fundamental characteristics of the post-auricular muscle response (PAMR) have been examined in adult and infant human subjects using an automated computer-based measurement system. This system allowed simultaneous examination of the changes in background electrical activity of the PAM, and extraction of information regarding the sound-evoked PAMR waveform, such as response amplitude and peak latency. It was found that the PAMR was best recorded using an active electrode located directly over the body of the muscle, and a reference electrode located on the dorsal surface of the pinna. In addition, it was found that during lateral rotation of the eyes towards the recording electrodes the peak-to-peak amplitude of the PAMR increased by an average of 525%. The increase in response amplitude was highly correlated with the increase in EMG observed during this manoeuvre, suggesting that the mechanisms that increase both EMG and PAMR amplitude probably occur at a common point. The voltage spectrum of the PAMR was also measured. Contrary to previous findings (Thornton, 1975), the voltage spectrum of the PAMR extended from 10 Hz to approximately 550 Hz, with a broad spectral peak centred between 70 Hz and 115 Hz. Finally, a cheap, efficient and reliable objective hearing test was developed, using the correlation measure of the PAMR. The availability of such a device has the potential to vastly increase the number of children that are screened for hearing disorders, especially in poorer communities who do not have the funds or the expertise to establish screening programs using the currently available objective techniques of ABR and oto-acoustic emission measurement.

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  • Our children, our choice: Priorities for policy.

    Ritchie, Jenny; Harvey, Nola; Kayes, Marianne; Smith, Carol (2014-06)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Children’s rights were invited late to the table of human rights’ discussions. Since the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCROC) in 1989, there has been growing recognition of the rights of even very young children. Aotearoa New Zealand has pledged certain rights to our children, founded in recognition of Te Tiriti o Waitangi (1840), the laws of the land, and international treaties. As well as UNCROC, we are signatories to the United Nations International Convention of the Rights of Indigenous People (2007). In addition to the most basic protected rights explicitly stated in national and international treaties and laws, there are moral imperatives to protect the most vulnerable. We live with our children in communities as much as we live in political states and interconnected economies. These children’s rights include, but are not confined to: care and protection, food, shelter, and education. Implicit in these rights is quality of life: children have the right to access such qualities and conditions as: loving and respectful care; protection from mental, emotional and physical maltreatment; nutritious food to support health and growth; access to warm, dry shelter; and access to appropriate education. In 2014, we are failing in our pledges to honour the rights of our children. The nature and quality of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECCE) provision becomes more critical as children are expected to spend ever more time in care. About Child Poverty Action Group Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) is an independent charity working to eliminate child poverty in New Zealand through research, education and advocacy. CPAG believes that New Zealand’s high rate of child poverty is not the result of economic necessity, but is due to policy neglect and a flawed ideological emphasis on economic incentives. Through research, CPAG highlights the position of tens of thousands of New Zealand children, and promotes public policies that address the underlying causes of the poverty they live in.

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  • Zoo in a sea of poop

    Brown Pulu, T

    Unclassified
    Auckland University of Technology

    The German physicist Albert Einstein defined insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. He could have been describing ‘Akilisi Pohiva and certain ministers of his hand-picked cabinet who developed a condition of repeatedly exhibiting foolhardiness in politics. (Fonua, 2015a). The zoo was behaving badly. Journalist Pesi Fonua wrote about “a screaming match” in parliament, one whale of a tale framed as a political commentary to inform media consumers. (Fonua, 2015b). What did Fonua’s colourful account reveal about the country’s state of affairs and quality of deliberation in the Tongan Legislative Assembly?

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  • Takitaki mai : a guide to motivational interviewing for Māori.

    Britt, Eileen F.; Gregory, Daryl; Tohiariki, Tohi; Huriwai, Terry (2014)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • After the quake

    Milke, M. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    This is a book review, though not classified that way by the journal.

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  • The effects of aural input enhancement on L2 acquisition

    Reinders, Hayo; Cho, Meiyoung (2013-07)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Input enhancement involves attempts to direct the learner’s attention to specific linguistic forms in target language input (Sharwood Smith, 1993). One way to do this is by manipulating the input in order to attract learners’ attention to the target feature, for example, by underlining or bolding it or by artificially increasing its frequency in the input (an input flood). A number of studies have investigated the effects of enriched input (e.g., Jourdenais, Ota, Stauffer, Boyson, & Doughty, 1995; Reinders & Ellis, 2009; Trahey & White, 1993; White, 1998). Although there is some evidence that enriched input can affect L2 acquisition of certain grammatical features, the results are not conclusive. Furthermore, previous studies have been limited to textual input enrichment. In this chapter we investigated the effects of aural input enhancement, a type of input enhancement that to the best of our knowledge has not been reported on before. Participants in the study were given an audiobook to listen to outside of class in which passive structures had been manipulated by 1) artificially increasing the volume slightly of the target items or by 2) slowing down the speed with which the target items were read out. A control group listened to the audiobooks in their original form. The repeated-measures ANOVA analysis showed no significant effect for the manipulated input on acquiring the target form. We discuss some possible reasons for this finding.

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  • The Man of Numbers: Fibonacci's Arithmetic Revolution : Book Review

    Hannah, J. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Self-access and independent learning centres

    Reinders, Hayo (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Self-access centres are learner-oriented language learning environments that encourage the development of learner autonomy (see LEARNER AUTONOMY). Self-access centres (SACs) provide materials, activities, and staff support to help learners develop the skills necessary for taking control over the content, pace, and method of their learning. SACs do not have to be physical spaces (although in practice they often are); increasingly, learning environments are being designed that either combine a physical space with an online support system or that provide all elements of self access online (see for example the Electronic Learning Environment and My English in the further reading section (Alford & Pachler, 2007; Conacher & Kelly-Holmes, 2007). SACs are especially common at tertiary institutions, although they exist at all other school levels, including in primary schools.

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  • Could your school have a STEM emphasis?

    Conner, L. (2013)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    There are various descriptions of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics education around the world. In the USA it includes the fields of Chemistry, Computer and Information Technology Science, Engineering, Geosciences, Life Sciences, Mathematical Sciences, Physics, and STEM Education and Learning Research. Partly differences in what is included in STEM arise due to different views of technology and the levels of integration of the subjects as they are combined or not, in curricula design. In the international arena, technology tends to be synonymous with ICT. In New Zealand, we have a separate subject domain called technology that includes design for innovation through technological practice, knowledge, and understanding about the nature of technology. Effective communication, including the use of information technology, collaboration, problem-solving, creative and critical thinking skills are fundamental to STEM.

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  • Bob Ham (1937-2012): A Pioneer in Waste Management

    Milke, M. (2013)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    This special issue of Waste Management is a series of papers in memory of Bob Ham. The papers are by former students and close colleagues, and also by researchers following along the paths blazed by Bob. As a preface to these papers, and a tribute to his memory, a number of contributors have provided their reflections.

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  • Tool, trophies in interactive learning

    Brogt, E. (2010)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Practical, Legal and Ethical Issues Surrounding Disaster Reporting in Christchurch in the Last Two Years

    Cheer, U. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    I want to talk a bit about a media project that I started work on over the summer, which is part of a larger project the Faculty of Law at Canterbury is carrying out, investigating the many legal issues that have arisen from the earthquakes.

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  • A whakapapa of technical, trade and vocational education in Aotearoa, New Zealand : origins of a hybrid VET system

    Maurice-Takerei, Lisa (2016-08-18)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This monograph provides a short history that discusses some of the changes, transformations and tensions from which TVET and in particular trade-related education in New Zealand has arisen. The monograph is part of a broader doctoral thesis, which explores the work of trade tutors in New Zealand polytechnics. The chapter from which the monograph has arisen stems from a desire to better understand the often-opaque environment in which TVET operates in New Zealand.

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  • A Defamation Case in the UK Involving the Qualified Privilege Defence and Why That's Significant for New Zealand

    Cheer, U. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    I will talk about a significant decision from the UK Supreme Court involving the very important developing qualified privilege defence – the Flood case. (We should have a decision in the Chris Cairns case by then too, so I will mention that briefly as well). The Flood case is important for NZ because it indicates how qualified privilege might develop as a defence over here. This decision was a unanimous one which dealt with what we call a preliminary question as to whether Times Newspapers could rely on a defence of qualified privilege in relation to an article it had published with the headline ‘Detective accused of taking bribes from Russian exiles’. The article contained allegations about a Mr Flood, who was a Detective Sergeant in the Extradition Unit of the Metropolitan Police. In the article, DS Flood was identified as possibly being a police officer at the centre of allegations about bribe taking in return for information from the Extradition Unit.

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  • King v Grundon: The need for real and substantial harm in defamation

    Cheer, U. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    I want to talk today about a recent decision of the UK High Court called King v Grundon. This was a defamation decision given extempore, which means an oral judgment given by the judge at the time – live, so to speak, or ‘off the cuff’. Such judgments are in the nature of doing immediate justice, but are persuasive only because of their ‘less thought out’ character. This makes the case a bit obscure, but it has an interesting New Zealand connection and is useful as an example of where the law is going and where it might go here.

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  • Censorship and 'Fifty Shades of Grey'

    Cheer, U. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    I want to talk about censorship of literature today, because the censor’s office just has classified Fifty Shades of Grey, by EL James. This is the book that started life as a piece of fan fiction based on that other classic series of books, the Twilight Saga by Stephanie Meyer. Fifty Shades of Grey, which none of the publishing houses wanted to touch until it took off virally online and became known as ‘mommy porn’. Fifty Shades of Grey is the acceptable book about BDSM (bondage and discipline, dominance and submission and sadism and masochism) sexual practices. It has been suggested the book is so popular because although it is about atypical sexual practices, it is able to be hidden on the kindle, no need to let anyone know you are reading it or the two sequels Fifty Shades Books like these create a bit of a problem for the censorship system. Classics like Lady Chatterley’s Lover, Lolita, De Sade’s Justin, have been around for years, there are lots of them about, and they are accepted to be classics. Fifty Shades is what could be described as an instant classic. The series has sold 350,000 copies here, and it’s been voted Number 5 in Whitcoulls’ top 100 list for 2012-2013. It has sold 40 million copies around the world. Yet on the face of it, the book looks objectionable in terms of our censorship legislation.

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  • Dooley v Smith and Karam v Fairfax: Defamation and public interest cases

    Cheer, U. (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    I want to discuss two New Zealand defamation cases today, both of which tend to show an increasing relaxation or opening up of the law in ways which will benefit media.

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  • The Law Around Leaking and Breach of Confidence

    Cheer, U. (2013)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    As we know, it’s been a month of leaking, blogging and breaching court orders. I thought it would be a good idea to try and answer some general questions around the relevant laws, some of which have got mangled a bit in the reporting. What is a leak in terms of the law? Usually a leak involves a person who works for the government, a private organisation or for another individual publishing information that belongs to their employer and which they only know because of their employment relationship, to someone else who is not entitled to have it. This sort of activity is covered by the law called breach of confidence. This is not a criminal offence, but rather is a civil (or private) claim which one party brings against another. Third parties who receive such information and pass it on even though they know it is confidential, or even if they simply should know it is confidential, may also be breaching confidence. This area of the law is one that often impacts on media, which commonly receives information in unmarked envelopes, anonymous phone calls and so on.

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  • Media law - disaster reporting

    Cheer, U. (2013)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Today I want to discuss the ongoing issue of how the internet is affecting areas of media law – in this case, defamation law. Many questions have been raised about the issue of publication on the internet and whether it should be treated any differently than publication in any other media, such as hard copy newspapers, broadcasting, on bill boards and the like.

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