660 results for Unclassified

  • Destratification – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Paul, Wendy J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    During summer, the surface waters of lakes warm and become less dense than the colder bottom waters. This process is known as stratification and prevents surface and bottom water mixing. Stratification can occur intermittently in shallower lakes or for up to 9 months in deeper lakes (Figure 1). Under natural conditions stratification normally breaks down during the winter months when surface temperatures equilibrate with the bottom of the lake.

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  • Legal status of Rudd, Catfish, Goldfish – fact sheet

    Collier, Kevin J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    New Zealand has a total of about 36 native freshwater fish species, and a further 22 species (equivalent to 38% of all freshwater fish species) have been introduced from overseas. Like all introduced species, they have some impact on New Zealand's native ecosystems, but some cause more problems than others.

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  • LERNZdb Freshwater Database – fact sheet

    Parshotam, Aroon (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    The LERNZdb Freshwater Database is a repository for freshwater quality data and biodiversity measurement data for lakes, rivers and wetlands in New Zealand. It was developed as part of the Lake Ecosystem Restoration New Zealand (LERNZ: LERNZ.co.nz) programme in co-operation between the Information & Technology Services Division (ITS) and LERNZ researchers at the University of Waikato. LERNZdb has the ability to store a wide variety of freshwater data in a consistent format, it also scores the quality of the data based on the provided quality controlled information. This allows the user to filter data based on the standard of data collection and encourages the provision of high quality data for use in modelling applications.

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  • Invasive fish and nutrients – fact sheet

    Hicks, Brendan J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Invasive fish such as koi (or common) carp (Cyprinus carpio) are large fish as adults (typically 1-3 kg) and can exist at high biomass (commonly 1000-2000 kg/ha). Because of their large size, high biomass, and suctorial feeding behaviour that disturbs the lake bed, koi carp have the potential to contribute a significant amount of plant nutrients (nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)) to lake waters. To estimate the potential of koi carp to inhibit lake restoration, we estimated the rates of excretion relative to other processes contributing nutrients to lakes.

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  • Remote sensing of water quality – fact sheet

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Allan, Mathew Grant (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Evaluating water quality is a key tool in lake management. Typically water quality samples are restricted to a limited number of point samples collected in situ in the field, which can be time consuming and costly. Also, the few in situ points sampled fail to capture the spatial variability, e.g., for the large Lake Waikare (3,400 ha; Figure. 1).

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  • Genetic tools – fact sheet

    Hogg, Ian D. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Morphological identification of organisms can be challenging and often requires specialist knowledge to ensure accurate identifications especially, if specimens are microscopic, as is the case with zooplankton (Figure 1). It can also be challenging to know what species of fish or other taxa are in a lake or waterway without extensive surveys. For these reasons, LERNZ has been developing the use of genetic tools for species identification.

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  • Whole-lake fish removal – fact sheet

    Hicks, Brendan J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    A central objective of our lake restoration research was to remove invasive fish from 5 lakes of >5 ha in area to restore indigenous biodiversity. We chose a variety of lakes with dominant invasive fish species ranging from goldfish to perch and koi carp (Figure 1 and Table 1). Because of the priority accorded to Lower Karori Reservoir by end users we relaxed the original criterion of> 5 ha lake area. We fished with a variety of fishing methods (boat electrofish ing, fyke and seine netting, and feeder (pod) trapping).

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  • Effects of introduced fish on zooplankton – fact sheet

    Duggan, Ian C. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Zooplankton are small animals that feed on algae and bacteria in lakes, and are in turn food for small fish. Three major zooplankton groups exist in lakes; the cladocerans and copepods, which are both small crustaceans, and the rotifers (Figure 1). Like other animals, many zooplankton species have naturally distinct geographies, meaning New Zealand has species that are not known from other parts of the world. Many zooplankton species are sensitive to changes in water quality and fish introductions.

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  • Pest fish detection using environmental DNA – fact sheet

    Banks, Jonathan C.; Hogg, Ian D. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Molecular tools using DNA sequencing can improve pest fish management by ensuring accurate identification of fish, especially larval fish, without the need for specialist taxonomic knowledge. DNA is made of four chemicals; guanine (G), adenine (A), thymine (T), or cytosine (C), joined together as a string (Figure 1). The order of the chemicals is unique to each species and can be used as a DNA "barcode" to identify organisms. It is relatively simple to obtain DNA sequences for a reference gene such as the widely accepted "barcode gene" cytochrome C oxidase subunit 1, and compare the sequence to a voucher specimen sequence in genetic databases such as GenBank and the Barcode of Life database BOLD.

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  • Tales of the unexpected: halloysite delivers surprises and a paradox

    Lowe, David J.; Churchman, G. Jock (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Despite being first described nearly 200 years ago, halloysite still has the capacity to surprise. We report here the remarkable discovery in New Zealand of two new morphologies for this 1:1 Si:Al layered aluminosilicate member of the kaolin subgroup. One discovery was entirely serendipitous, thus lending validity to the famous phrase attributed to scientist Isaac Asimov: The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not “Eureka” but “That’s funny...”. Moreover, the recognition of one of the new morphologies of halloysite helped enable a long-standing problem regarding the geotechnical property of sensitivity and its impact on landsliding in the Tauranga region, eastern North Island, to be solved. Such landsliding has commonly been attributed (possibly erroneously) to the dominance of nanocrystalline allophane, the clay commonly associated with halloysite in many weathered pyroclastic sequences and volcanogenic soils in North Island. In this article, we briefly summarise the circumstances and implications of the two discoveries relating to halloysite morphology, one published in Clay Minerals and the other in Geology, and a third study (also in Clay Minerals) relating in part to the formation of halloysite.

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  • Guest editorial by Sunita Basnet: Bhutanese refugee women and girls in NZ

    Basnet, Sunita (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    These former Bhutanese refugee women and girls were resettled in Christchurch, Nelson, Palmerston North and Auckland since 2008 under the New Zealand refugee quota. According to the UNHCR Nepal, as of 30th June 2016, 104,009 Bhutanese refugees from Nepal have been resettled in eight countries. New Zealand has resettled 1,009 making New Zealand the fourth largest hosting country. The interviews were conducted in Nepali, then have been translated to English.

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  • Zone of the Marvellous: In Search of the Antipodes by Martin Edmond, Auckland University Press, 2009. NZ RRP $34.99. Reviewed by Brenda Allen.

    Allen, Brenda (2009)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this review I outline the main argument and structure of Martin Edmund's book, Zone of the Marvellous: In Search of the Antipodes for readers of Takahe.

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  • Brenda Allen Talks with Christchurch Artist Jane Schollum

    Schollum, J; Allen, Brenda (2011)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    Takah??'s featured artist this issue is Jane Schollum and we are concentrating on her works from two periods of productivity: the mid 1990s and the first few years of the twenty-first century. Works from these periods are significantly and visibly influenced by rural Canterbury's browns and yellows, and the popular culture of that time. Overlaid are tensions arising from Jane's experiences as a gay woman living in one of our more conservative cities.

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  • The Dragon and the Taniwha: M??ori and Chinese in New Zealand, edited and introduced by Manying Ip (foreword by Margaret Mutu)

    Allen, Brenda (2011)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Review of ???The Dragon and the Taniwha: M??ori and Chinese in New Zealand, edited and introduced by Manying Ip (foreword by Margaret Mutu)???. Auckland: Auckland University Press, 2009. Paperback 373pp. $44.99. ISBN 978 1 86940 436 9. Takah??, 71.3. April 2011 (500 words)

    Allen, Brenda (2010)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    The reviewed volume, ???The Dragon and the Taniwha: M??ori and Chinese in New Zealand', edited and introduced by Manying Ip (foreword by Margaret Mutu), is a scholarly edition of essays. In this review I outline the main topics of the collection and point to the main reasons why, and for whom, these are interesting and/or useful.

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  • Research collaboration with the State Key Laboratory for Internal Combustion Engines at Tianjin University, China. Topic: "Alternative fuels for internal combustion engines".

    Raine, Robert; Yao, C (2009)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Editorial to the publication Takahe,

    Allen, Brenda (2011)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this editorial for Takahe I outlined the function of the cultural studies section as opposed to the art, fiction and poetry sections, and argued that the distinctions usually drawn between high and low arts should not apply to cultural studies.

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  • Book review: Literature and Science: Doomed Reductionism or Evolutionary Literary Pluralism? - A review of Jon Adams, Interference Patterns: Literary Study, Scientific Knowledge, and Disciplinary Autonomy

    Boyd, Brian (2008)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Thesis review: Dis/identifications and dis/articulations: young women and feminism in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Connor, Helene (2015-02-02)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In the first of the Theses Review Series Dr Helene Connor reviews the work of Laura Ashton: “I don’t necessarily go out there and tell everyone that I’m a feminist, but I won’t go out there and tell everyone that I’m a musician either”: Dis/identifications and Dis/articulations: Young Women and Feminism in Aotearoa/New Zealand. In this thoroughly researched and skillfully written thesis, the premise is that whilst many young women value the work of the early feminists in terms of gender equality and individual freedom for themselves, only a small number position themselves as feminist.

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  • Thesis review : the role of SANZ, a migrant radio programme, in making sense of place for South African migrants in New Zealand

    Meadows, Michael (2016-11-15)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This study is a detailed, qualitative exploration of the role played by a South African migrant radio programme, SANZ Live, in supporting its audience to create a sense of place in Auckland, New Zealand, through a range of on- and off-air activities. The thesis concludes that SANZ Live contributes to the creation of opportunities for South African migrants to find a sense of place through producing media content, participating in face-to-face communication through the off-air activities of SANZ Live, participating in SANZ Live social media and perpetuating aspects of South African culture through various programme-related activities. This multi-layered participation works to establish a new routine and a hybrid culture that enables South African migrants to establish new individual, group and collective identities – establish new individual, group and collective identities – becoming ‘South African Kiwis’ – in their new home of choice.

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