598 results for Unclassified

  • Capacity building and disaster response : a case study of NGOs' response to Cyclone Evan in Samoa : a research report presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the degree of Masters of International Development at Massey University, New Zealand

    Pycroft, Virginia

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    With natural disasters increasing both in number and economic impact, the challenge for governments is to effectively respond to the needs of affected communities. In difficult conditions, and often with resource constraints, Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) have contributed to meeting the needs of affected communities during disaster responses. NGOs usually have flexible structures, which enable them to respond to a rapidly changing environment. They also often have strong links to the communities in which they work, which creates good synergies when responding to disasters. The involvement of NGOs in a disaster response has been discussed widely in the international community. The challenge is to ensure that NGOs have the capacity to respond effectively when the need arises. This report has a particular focus on Samoa and uses a capacity building lens to investigate a disaster response. It looks closely at the ability of NGOs to assist the Samoan government in a disaster response. The report used a document analysis and semi-structured interviews, with representatives from NGOs involved in the response to Cyclone Evan in 2012, to investigate capacity building in NGOs with a view to enabling them to respond effectively in disaster. The key finding of the report is that the ability of NGOs to form relationships with other stakeholders and to maintain those relationships between disaster responses is important to building partnerships that contribute to the effectiveness of a response.

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  • Closing the gaps: Maori and information literacy

    Lilley, Spencer C

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Paper presented at User Education for User Empowerment: Commonwealth Library Association Conference 19 – 20 October 2000 Christchurch, New Zealand.

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  • The (un)happiness of knowledge and the knowledge of (un)happiness: Happiness research and policies for knowledge-based economies

    Engelbrecht, Hans-Juergen

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Paper presented to the International Conference Policies for Happiness, June 14-17, 2007, Certosa di Pontignano, University of Siena, Italy.

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  • Aurora Leadership Institutes: Assisting future leaders to maximise their leadership skills and potential

    Lilley, Spencer C

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Paper presented at Oceans of Opportunities: Library and Information Association of New Zealand Aotearoa 2003 Conference, 7 – 10 October 2003 Napier, New Zealand

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  • Comedy, pain and nonsense at the Red Moon Cafe: The Little Tramp's death by service work in Modern Times

    Sayers, Janet; Monin, Nanette

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Paper presented at the Art of Management Conference, 2004, Paris

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  • Takemusu Aiki: Insights into Optimizing Ideational Flow

    Bradford, Mark

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    The Fourth Art of Management and Organization Conference, Banff, Canada, 9-12 August 2008

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  • Issues in equivalence: Information literacy and the distance student

    Lamond, Heather; White, Bruce

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Information Literacy is a recognised lifelong learning skill, and an expected graduate attribute. With the growth in distance provision of tertiary education it is important to acknowledge the barriers faced by distance students and the difficulties libraries face in delivering equivalent learning opportunities to students who are physically isolated from their institution. This paper outlines the importance of information literacy, the major barriers faced by distance students and makes suggestions as to how institutions and their libraries can better meet their learning needs.

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  • Reflections on professional training: A post-Auroran view

    Lilley, Spencer C

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Paper presented at Capitalising on Knowledge: Australian Library and Information Association 2000 Conference, 23 – 26 October 2000 Canberra, ACT

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  • A longitudinal study of mastitis on an experimental farm with two herds, one managed organically, the other conventionally.

    Petrovski, Kiro

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Mastitis in two herds managed as a comparison between organic and conventional dairy farming systems was monitored for 4 years utilising regular bacterial culture of milk samples, individual and bulk somatic cell counts and observation by farm staff. The objective was to develop strategies for the control of mastitis in organic cows without the use of antibiotics. The herds showed differences in clinical mastitis incidence, subclinical mastitis prevalence and bulk milk somatic cell count. Despite these differences, the level of mastitis in the organic herd remained manageable.

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  • Integrating content-based language learning and intercultural learning online: An international eGrops collaboration

    Walker, Ute Gerda; vom Brocke, Christina

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Learning language through content in the tertiary context presents a challenge in that language teachers, particularly in EAP/ESP contexts, are not necessarily experts in their students’ speciality subject areas, while subject experts might lack language teaching methodology. Furthermore, intercultural awareness, a key qualification in today’s global work environment, tends to take a back seat in a content-based approach. This paper reports on a didactic concept which integrates subject-based language learning with intercultural experience through online collaboration in an international eGroups set-up. The creation of a collaborative learning space aimed to bring together learners from different cultural contexts (New Zealand and Germany) and with different target languages (German and English) towards shared learning outcomes. Data from student interactions will help illustrate to what extent the eGroups model promoted interactive, communicative and intercultural competence through content-related bilingual collaboration.

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  • Detecting Fraud in Chinese Listed Company Balance Sheets

    Wei, Y; Chen, JG; Wirth, CG

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    This study investigates the links between accounting values in Chinese listed companies’ balance sheets and the exposure of their fraudulent activities. Every balance sheet account is proposed to be a potential vehicle to manipulate financial statements. Other receivables, inventories, prepaid expenses, employee benefits payables and long-term payables are important indicators of fraudulent financial statements. These results confirm that asset account manipulation is frequently carried out and cast doubt on earlier conclusions by researchers that inflation of liabilities is the most common source of financial statement manipulation. Prior practices of solely scaling balance sheet values by assets are revealed to produce spurious relationships, while scaling by both assets and sales effectively detects fraudulent financial statements and provides a useful fraud prediction tool for Chinese auditors, regulators and investors.

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  • Research ethics: A New Zealand perspective

    Flett, RA

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    false

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  • Sustainable development : a model Indonesian SRI co-operative : this research paper is presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development, Massey University, New Zealand

    Sharp, Gawain

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    This research report explores how ‘sustainable livelihoods’ have been achieved at a model cooperative using the ‘System of Rice Intensification’ named SIMPATIK. To conduct the research a novel template was developed. The framework was required following a review of sustainable livelihood literature which found deficiencies with the ‘sustainable livelihoods framework’, particularly its treatment of equity, social capital, culture and agro-ecology which disqualified the framework as an appropriate approach for the research. Amekawa’s (2011) ‘Integrated Sustainable Livelihoods Framework’ which synthesises agro-ecology and the sustainable livelihoods framework is then discussed. Further work is then presented on social capital which this paper argues has a critical role in facilitating access to livelihood capitals. A discussion of the significance of culture then follows to underline its importance as a form of livelihood capital. The research then introduces an operational model that is appropriate to the local cultural, institutional and geographical context to demonstrate how livelihood capitals are linked to livelihood outcomes, a model I have labelled the ‘Apt-Integrated Sustainable Livelihoods Framework’. This framework is then informed through field research at the SIMPATIK co-operative. Impact pathways through ‘synergetic forms of social capital’ and the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) are shown indeed to lead to sustainable livelihood outcomes for research participants. The ‘sequencing’ of livelihood capitals is seen to be critical and the research culminates in the development of a ‘SRI Co-operative Template for Sustainable Livelihoods’; a transferable model that shows how SRI can be promoted as a sustainable livelihood strategy.

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  • A comparison of New Zealand police officers' perceptions of development practice within New Zealand development programmes : a research paper presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development, School of People, Environment and Planning, Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Brennan, Kevin J

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    From the 1990s onwards, the New Zealand Police followed a global trend of progressively becoming involved in overseas peacekeeping and development deployments that over time changed from operational interventions to deployments that were more developmental in nature. While development concepts within these New Zealand Police development interventions have been committed to in principal, there has been little or no research undertaken as to how New Zealand police perceive and undertake their roles within these interventions. Using a post-development framework this research explores how these development interventions and the subsequent expectations for the role of the New Zealand police officer during development interventions overseas were created. A survey and interviews were conducted with a small number of New Zealand police officers who have deployed within these interventions to identify their perceptions of development practice so as to compare with the expectations of the development programmes. My research predominantly finds that New Zealand police officers place a high value on their prior New Zealand policing experiences. In implementing development programmes there was an overwhelming recognition by the research participants for the need to form positive relationships by listening and acknowledging another’s culture. This recognition of the benefits of positive working relationships has led this research to conclude that a recognition of the importance of the personal agency of New Zealand police officers could contribute to recognise and support the personal agency of their development partner to achieve realistic and desirable development outcomes for the intended beneficiary, provided programme design is constructed to incorporate this approach.

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  • Involving young men in preventing violence against women : a case study of Instituto Promundo's Program H : a research report presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development at Massey University, Manawatū, New Zealand

    Rose, Courtney-Jane

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Intimate partner violence among youth is recognised as a public health concern, an obstacle to economic development, and a gross violation of human rights. This research found that intimate partner violence against women is closely linked to inequitable gender attitudes. In order to combat violence related to these gender attitudes, prevention interventions have particularly targeted young men in recent years. However, in aiming to solve this issue, violence prevention has often heavily focused on reducing the risk of negative behaviour, rather than positively empowering youth participation and growth. Approaches that instead view youth as resources to be developed, rather than simply as risks to society, are recommended. This research is focusing specifically on Instituto Promundo as an example of an organisation that seeks to fulfil youth rights in practice and improve youth behaviour and attitudes relating to gender within the Brazilian context. Promundo’s ‘Program H’ works to empower young men to rewrite harmful traditional masculinities and ultimately prevent violence through engagement in both individual and community activities. This report utilised a Positive Youth Development framework to investigate Program H, and found that the initiative has the potential to simultaneously prevent the risk of violence while also promoting positive youth behaviour. Program H significantly contributes to changing inequitable gender norms amongst young men, with potential positive and empowering flow-on effects to the young people of Brazil and the wider Latin American region.

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  • Walking with broken crutches : exploring the effects of host-state fragility upon refugees : a research project presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development, School of People, Environment and Planning, Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Foreman, Mark

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    This research report explores the relationship between state fragility and the hosting of refugees in the context of the protracted Afghan refugee crisis, where fragile state Pakistan hosts Afghan refugees. The reality for the majority of the world’s refugees is that their hosts are neighbouring countries which are in varying conditions of state fragility. Some states are bearing the brunt of the global refugee burden despite their general struggle to provide basic services and livelihood opportunities for their own citizens. For these ‘fragile hosts’, providing for an influx of refugees would be untenable without significant international assistance. Following a comprehensive literature review looking at the complex interplay between conflict, state fragility, underdevelopment and forced migration, the report case study is prefaced by background chapters surveying the factors which triggered Afghan forced migration, and Pakistan’s fragile status as host respectively. This report then offers an analysis of two region-specific UNHCR documents which explores the relationship between Afghan refugees and Pakistan as ‘fragile host’. Various host-state incapacities were found to entrench endemic poverty and insecurity in the Afghan refugee population in Balochistan due to a lack of livelihood opportunities, and availability and access to quality services. These issues have also created barriers to local refugee integration, and the fluctuating interest of international donors has historically served to exacerbate these challenges. This report argues that a much-improved understanding of the multi-layered and complex regional, national and local relationships between protracted conflict, state fragility and refugee-host dynamics is needed in order to approach a sustainable solution.

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  • I am not the problem : challenging deficit narratives of indigenous development through alternative media : a research report presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Stillwell, Laura

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    The aim of this research was to explore the extent to which alternative media sources challenge normative representations of Indigenous peoples and provide an opportunity for alternate representations, specifically expressions of agency and empowerment. Mainstream media oversimplifies Indigenous development goals and relies heavily upon stereotypes and problematising discourses. Critical analysis of alternative news articles show that alternative media represents issues related to Indigenous development from a collective perspective, demonstrating a strong presence of solidarity. Contestation of problematising discourses is commonly situated in a context of colonisation and ongoing marginalisation and through this narrative stories of agency and empowerment are shared. Overwhelmingly, there was evidence that Indigenous development was not being undertaken in a participatory approach, the state failing to consult and instead enforcing paternalistic and punitive policies specifically targeting Indigenous communities. A key finding of this research is that alternative media provides a voice for those silenced by state processes and policies, disseminating urgent calls for community-based engagement and recognition of the ongoing impacts of colonisation for Indigenous development.

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  • Standard Terms of Construction Contract for Renovation and Small Projects (STCC-RSP 2015)

    Ameer Ali, NAN

    Unclassified
    Massey University

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  • Climate change in the Indian mind.

    Leiserowitz, A; Thaker, JJ

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    false

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  • 2nd Aviation Education and Research Symposium: “Contemporary Issues in Aviation Education and Research”

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Massey University School of Aviation is pleased to announce the second Aviation Education and Research Symposium to be held at Palmerston North on 28-29 July 2010, in conjunction with the Aviation Industry Association of New Zealand and Royal Aeronautical Society, New Zealand. This event is intended as a forum for disseminating research and discussing current issues in aviation, with an emphasis on bridging theory and practice. It will present an opportunity for "a meeting of the minds" for academics and practitioners in the aviation industry. The theme for this symposium "Contemporary Issues in Aviation Education and Research" is broad to encourage a greater spectrum of submissions encompassing aviation psychology, education, technology, training, and the economic aspects of the industry. We are delighted at the interest generated and the range of papers received from Australia and New Zealand. The conference papers have been classified into five sessions, with ‘Aviation Psychology’ and ‘Aviation Education’ on the first day, followed by ‘Commercial Aspects of Aviation’, ‘Aviation Technology’ and ‘Training for new technology - the man-machine interface’ on the second day. We welcome delegates to attend, participate and share information on the latest developments in the industry.

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