597 results for Unclassified

  • Learning English for a life of choice in New Zealand : a case study of Afghan women refugees' bilingual class experiences in Palmerston North : a research project presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development Development Studies, Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Hermawan, Erika Soraya

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    This thesis looks at the experiences of a group of women refugees learning English as part of their resettlement in New Zealand. The women’s husbands were working as interpreters for the New Zealand Police in Bamiyan, Afghanistan. To ensure their safety after the New Zealand Police were withdrawn, these Afghan families were invited to resettle in Palmerston North, New Zealand. To attain in-depth results, this research report focuses on the women’s efforts to integrate within the social life of New Zealand and their experiences in acquiring English as a tool to their successful resettlement program. A small study was conducted in the context of an English Language Partners’ (ELP) Bilingual English for Speakers of Other Language (ESOL)-Literacy class for refugees. Participants for this research were five Afghan women, two ELP’s ESOL teachers, and one of the women’s husbands. The methods used were semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions, classroom observation, and curriculum analysis. This report is framed within adult pre-literacy education and investigates whether women refugees become empowered through taking literacy classes. Findings show that there are links between language acquisition within the refugees’ resettlement process and personal empowerment. Afghan women’s acquisition of English language skills has brought more personal control over their mobility and has changed relationships with their husbands to some extent since moving to New Zealand. Furthermore, the woman’s learning experiences have brought them to a level where they can move on from ELP to a higher English level class.

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  • Minding our ps and qs: Issues of property, provenance, quantity and quality in institutional repositories

    White, Bruce

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    The development of institutional repositories has opened the path to the mass availability of peer-reviewed scholarly information and the extension of information democracy to the academic domain. A secondary space of free-to-all documents has begun to parallel the hitherto-closed world of journal publishing and many publishers have consented to the inclusion of copyrighted documents in digital repositories, although frequently specifying that a version other than the formally-published one be used. This paper will conceptually examine the complex interplay of rights, permissions and versions between publishers and repositories, focussing on the New Zealand situation and the challenges faced by university repositories in recruiting high-quality peer-reviewed documents for the open access domain. A brief statistical snapshot of the appearance of material from significant publishers in repositories will be used to gauge the progress that has been made towards broadening information availability. The paper will also look at the importance of harvesting and dissemination, in particular the role of Google Scholar in bringing research information within reach of ordinary internet users. The importance of accuracy, authority, provenance and transparency in the presentation of research-based information and the important role that librarians can and should play in optimising the open research discovery experience will be emphasised.

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  • Sport as a vehicle for development in Vanuatu : a review of the literature and analysis of the Women's Island Cricket Project : a research project presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of International Development, Development Studies, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Farrell, Julie Ann

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Approaches to development delivery have changed significantly post World War II. Current development delivery practices are often referred to as the 4th paradigm of aid delivery. A focus on the concept of empowerment through the delivery of aid has become very popular, especially in relation to women’s development (Cornwall & Brock, 2005, Batliwala, 2007). The 3rd Millennium Development Goal with an aim to empower women is a good example of the increased international focus on and support for, the development of women around the world. This popularity has also surfaced within the new and emerging Sport-for-Development paradigm. The marrying of Sport for Development and empowerment seem to be synonymous in a number of aid projects. However due to the fact that empowerment is a multi-faceted and contested term, there are issues concerning implementation and effectiveness of Sports for Development projects. Monitoring and evaluating Sport for Development projects continues to be an issue many writers lament about. As many have empowerment as an end goal, this is something that causes disquiet in the development field. With the above-mentioned in mind, this research project aimed to investigate, via a desk-based study and field observations, in what ways the Women’s Island Cricket Project in Vanuatu has contributed to women’s empowerment and identify what some of the consequences of this empowerment of participants were at the personal, family and community level. Using Kabeer’s (1999, 2005) notion that empowerment is about the ability to make choices to improve one’s life, and transform one’s life, I consider whether the women involved in the cricket project had acquired agency – the ability to transform – and whether the women have changed the way they feel about themselves and have been able to improve their own self-efficacy. My research identified that Island cricket has considerable ‘buy-in’ by the participants of the Women’s Island Cricket Project and their families. I conclude that this project has been successful, resulting in empowerment-type behavioural change for participants. Whilst paternalistic attitudes towards women exist in Vanuatu, on Ifira Island, the project has challenged and transformed some of these historical attitudes. Development Alternatives for Women of a New Era’s idea that women’s solidarity adds to empowerment (Sen & Grown, 1988) was observed by me when attending the Women’s Island Cricket Committee meeting. Whilst Vanuatu women who play cricket are the focus of this aid project, the reality is that despite sport for women not being equal with empowerment opportunities available to male sports people, well-planned and well-organised Sport for Development projects that involve local women in the planning, implementation and evaluation, are meritorious and provide considerable scope to transform participant’s lives.

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  • International approaches to literacy for gender empowerment : a review of the literature and analysis in relation to Timor-Leste : a research project presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development, Development Studies, Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Martins, Sandra Gusmao

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    After 400 years of colonial rule and illegal occupation Timor-Leste gained independence (World Bank, 2004). However, in the wake of this, as they sought to rebuild the country, the newly founded government was faced with numerous development challenges, such as wide spread illiteracy and a non-existent education system. Given this non-existent education system and the extent of illiteracy noted more in the rural areas and in relation to women, part of the solution to addressing the issue was to implement informal literacy programmes. It was argued that increasing women?s literacy was an important strategy for increasing women?s social, political and economic participation and achieving empowerment (Olufunke, 2011). However there are also debates contesting that participation in literacy programmes automatically leads to the empowerment of women, rather the programmes on offered need to be understood in the context of the place where they are being delivered (Stromquist, 2002). With this in mind this research project seeks to critically explore firstly, international approaches to adult literacy with a specific focus on gender and empowerment, and secondly, the relevance of these international approaches to adult literacy as an empowering tool in relation to women in Timor-Leste. This desk-based exploration unpacks four international approaches to adult literacy, which come under the umbrella of critical literacy approaches, these are: „New Literacy Studies? (NLS), „Real Literacies Approach? (RLA), the „REFLECT? Method, and the „Community Literacy Approach? (CLA). These four approaches are critically discussed in relation to women?s empowerment focusing specifically on debates by Rowlands (1995, 1997) and Kabeer (1999), who draw on Freire?s (1970) concept of empowerment, conscientization. Having interrogated these four approaches I then reflected upon them in terms of the Timor-Leste situation, focusing specifically on issues of effectiveness and appropriateness. I conclude that rural women can experience empowerment through participation in adult literacy programmes. In considering the REFLECT Method, the common empowerment dimensions experienced are the personal sphere or dimension (Rowlands, 1995, 1997), the achievement dimension (Kabeer, 1999), with evidence of „conscientization? or critical consciousness (Freire, 1970). The REFLECT Method is thus considered to be the most appropriate and effective approach to adult literacy and gender in Timor-Leste. However, this approach can also be combined with other approaches (in particular the RLA), which is implemented nationwide in Timor-Leste. However it is important to note that literacy itself does not guarantee empowerment, there is a need to think beyond literacy and how (within) this process women can access their fundamental rights, as well as possibilities of power (Archer, 2002).

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  • Gastrointestinal Protozoa Report for the New Zealand Ministry of Health, July 2013 to June 2014

    Hayman, DTS; Biggs, P; Pita, A; Velathanthiri, N; Phiri, B; Shrestha, R; Lal, A; French, NP

    Unclassified
    Massey University

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  • Seven Tragedies of Sophocles - Antigone

    Bond, Robin (2014-10-10)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

    Translated by Robin Bond

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  • PV in Blueskin: Drivers, barriers and enablers of uptake of household photovoltaic systems in the Blueskin communities, Otago, New Zealand

    King, Geoff; Stephenson, Janet; Ford, Rebecca (2014-10)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Copyright The Authors

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  • New Zealand’s future transport system: drivers of change. Initial report from the NZ Delphi study.

    Stephenson, Janet; Hopkins, Debbie; McCarthy, Alaric (2014-12)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    A workstream of the Energy Cultures research programme Centre for Sustainability, University of Otago http://energycultures.org

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  • Energy Cultures 2: Data Mining: Trends in Household and Business Energy Use

    Williams, John (2014-10-01)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    A workstream of the Energy Cultures research programme Centre for Sustainability, University of Otago http://energycultures.org

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  • Does negative advertising work?

    Kolovos, Ioannis; Harris, Phil (2005-11)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    In an overview of the use of negative advertising through the years, Kaid (1999) notes a real increase in the number of negative advertisements used in presidential campaigns. From 1952 to 1996, such ads made up about 38% of the whole campaign, but during the 1992 and 1996 campaigns, they made up more than half of the total advertising content. Moreover, Kaid (1999) notes that Bill Clinton’s campaigns in 1992 and 1996 reached all time highs in the use of negative ads with 69% and 68% respectively. But does negative advertising work?

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  • The roof maintenance problem — a fuzzy expert system

    Moyle, Sam A; Watts, Mike (2001)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Roof maintenance is an issue that has ongoing ramifications for property owners, all over the world. Determining accurately what maintenance should be taken is difficult, with often-conflicting evidence further complicating the task. A system has been developed for use by Roof Maintenance Experts. The expert can input information about the condition of the roof then a Fuzzy Neural Network makes an assessment, returning probable roof maintenance options. This is a non-trivial problem from the realworld domain. Often, many combinations of possible maintenance can occur and, as individual parameters change, so does the prime (or most important) option. A fuzzy neural network system was developed for assessment, running on a handheld device that could be taken into the field by a roof maintenance expert.

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  • MatLab/database connectivity

    Moyle, Sam A (2003-03)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    This experiment was run following a visit to the University of Queensland, where a simulation engine has been created using MatLab SimuLink. This simulator is developed for use as the underlying engine in future User Interface (UI) experiments. The simulator engine currently gets/puts information via a DDL link to an MS Excel spreadsheet. While this is suitable for initial testing, when UI experiments are run the data transfer method will need to be faster. There is a need for more data to be collected in order to accurately assess system state at any time during the experiment. There are two methods currently proposed to achieve this latter goal. One is to send a record to the database when the state of some component changes. The other is to capture the entire system state at pre-determined times then save the entire system state. The former method is expected to have less impact on resources, but prevents making temporal comparisons (unless you wish to replay the entire experiment). If possible, the latter method is preferred. It was recognised that some bottlenecks exist under the current system design. Notably, the simulation engine requires significant processor power to run effectively and that the resources required by MS Excel slow processes. The experiment has the following goals: Is a single, large, transaction more efficient than multiple smaller transactions? Does machine speed/specifications have an effect on how the experiment runs? Does the ODBC processing overhead have an adverse impact on data transfer speed? Does network connectivity speed have an impact on data transfer speed? Does the number of fields being transferred have an impact on data transfer speed? By identifying what combination is most effective we can then determine an optimal hardware setting for future UI experiments. This experiment is comparative in nature. It is not fully robust due to limitations in tool availability. However, the comparisons made may be useful in eliminating some of the possibilities and guiding further experiments. Three hardware setups were used. Two computers are similar in specification, but with different network connection speeds. The third was a much lower specified, but served to provide a comparative role – how much difference does improved machine specification make?

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  • The use of fuzzy tools for small scale decision support systems

    Moyle, Sam A (1999)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    This paper discusses the use of fuzzy tools in the realm of Decision Support Systems. I have investigated the possible use of a number of different paradigms against a novel problem - that of correctly classifying the maintenance required on a concrete tiled roof, given certain input values.

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  • Fuzzy neural networks (FuNN) in the Palm environment

    Moyle, Sam A; Watts, Mike (2002-08)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    This document is prepared with two purposes in mind. The first is to introduce the roof maintenance problem and the proposed solutions. The second is to describe its implementation for the Palm platform. The first section comprises a fairly comprehensive description of the roof maintenance problem and expected outcomes, as described by a roof maintenance expert. The purpose is not to train any individual to be come a roof maintenance expert, rather to demonstrate that the decision made by such an expert can be broken down into realistic components and subsequently acted upon. Because they can be broken down, it is possible to replicate and create an expert system able to make decision (at least in part) based on the values immediately available. The second section concentrates on actual implementation. Firstly a prototype using desktop resources is described, then the re-development for Palm devices. Within this section, the decision process and steps taken are described – which will hopefully prevent others making some of the errors made in getting this far. Section 3 describes the outcomes and directions that may be taken in the future. There are many things that can be done to improve interface design and make things easier for the end user– the roof maintenance expert.

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  • Voter apathy in British elections: causes and remedies

    Kolovos, Ioannis; Harris, Phil (2005-11)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    The turnout for the 2001 General election in Britain was the lowest ever after full adult suffrage. This essay presents the theoretical explanations of voter apathy and then reviews the literature on the causes behind the increasing voter abstention in General elections in Britain. Finally, the measures which have been proposed in order to increase voter participation are presented and critically assessed.

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  • The Marketing course at Otago 1966-1990: A case study in curriculum technology, University fashions and politics

    Mueller-Heumann, Guenther (2007)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    This paper is a case study of the development of the Marketing Management course at the University of Otago over 25 years. Key development phases and turning points in the history of the curriculum are presented and discussed. In 1966 the first Marketing Management paper at the University of Otago was taught by the then Professor of Accounting. In 1990, the Department of Marketing offered a programme which took up half of the course work for the B.Com. in Marketing Management. It had a very large number of undergraduate and postgraduate students and its staffing establishment included two chairs and more than 35 staff, some of them part-time. In such an enormous operation, academic leadership and staffing problems arise which are quite different from those of most of the small Marketing groups and departments typical for Australasian tertiary institutions.

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  • The development of Rugby Super 12 and its implications for tourism: the case of the Otago Highlanders

    Higham, James E S; Hinch, Tom (1999-02)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    This report presents a detailed analysis of the impacts of Rugby Super 12 on the tourism industry in the Otago Highlanders region. It presents the results of a qualitative programme of research for which individuals involved in the administration of Rugby Super 12 (rugby unions) and tourism development (local government and tourism promotion offices) were interviewed. A sport tourism framework is presented in this report and used to explore the impacts of sport on the spatial and temporal dimensions of tourism. The manner in which Rugby Super 12 affects travel patterns and offers potential for tourism development in the Highlanders region is then explored. Study participants felt that Rugby Super 12 has had significant implications for tourism in Southern New Zealand. It was seen as generating increased domestic travel into and within the region, attracting people who had little previous interest in rugby and encouraging international visitors to make rugby spectatorship part of their New Zealand tour itinerary. The introduction of Rugby Super 12 to the region was reported as having increased: the numbers of people travelling, their length of stay and their spending patterns. The Highlanders were also seen to present tourism development potential in terms of: • The promotion of Dunedin as an urban tourism destination (eg., floodlit night sport). • The further evolution of Carisbrook as an urban tourism icon. • The promotion of the heritage, history, lifestyles and attractions within the region. • The differentiation of the Southern Macro-region from other regions in New Zealand. • The promotion of the region as an international tourism destination through the televising of Highlanders games to international audiences. Rugby Super 12 was seen as benefiting the tourism sector within the region and offering great potential for further benefits. Capturing these benefits requires that the promotional opportunities presented by the Highlanders team (and the star players within it) be incorporated into tourism development strategies. It was also recognized that while Rugby Super 12 has had positive implications for tourism, the same is true for the impact of tourism on the Highlanders franchise. That is, the travel patterns generated by Rugby Super 12 benefit the tourism industry (people travelling further to be involved in sporting occasions) but increased tourism also benefits Otago rugby (e.g., through ground attendance, atmosphere, expanded supporter base, merchandise/ food and beverage/ season ticket sales). Additional research in this area will provide an information base upon which to make decisions that can maximize the mutual benefits of this relationship between sport and tourism.

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  • Marketing the mayor: political marketing and the Livingstone4London mayoral election campaign

    Harris, Phil; Ward, Matthew (2000)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Political marketing is commonly regarded as synonymous with the use of persuasive techniques in campaigns to promote both politicians and their policies. The borrowing of professional communication tools, such as advertising and public relations is believed to epitomise the concept of political marketing, as underlined by Kavanagh (1994:8) in his observation, `…parties are like businesses seeking to promote their products: one seeks votes, the other sales`. However, Maarek (1992) suggests that political marketing is a broader concept. Maarek (1992:28) emphasises that political marketing includes evaluation and re-design of policy and electoral strategy in the light of studies of the electorate’s concerns, underlined in his assertion; Political communication no longer means merely designing and printing a message on posters without consideration of whom they are addressed to. It encompasses the entire marketing process, from preliminary market study to testing and targeting. Concentrating on the Livingstone4London mayoral election campaign, this essay will apply the political marketing and public relations literature to features of the campaign. The three sections of the essay will follow the evolutionary models of political marketing outlined by Wring (1996) and other commentators. The first section of the essay will discuss the propaganda model of political communications, applying the concept to the most overt tools used by the Livingstone4London campaign. The second section of the essay will investigate behind the overt marketing tools of the campaign logo in purple colours and matching purple double-decker campaign bus to discuss the features of the campaign relevant to the `…”sales-led”…` model. The third section will analyse the political marketing concept, investigating the changes in policy and electoral strategy of the campaign. The essay will conclude that the Livingstone4London campaign’s wider appreciation of the political marketing concept contributed to its success.

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  • On the testability of BDI agent systems

    Winikoff, Michael; Cranefield, Stephen (2010-09-28)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Before deploying a software system we need to assure ourselves (and stake- holders) that the system will behave correctly. This assurance is usually done by testing the system. However, it is intuitively obvious that adaptive systems, including agent-based systems, can exhibit complex behaviour, and are thus harder to test. In this paper we examine this “obvious intuition” in the case of Belief-Desire-Intention (BDI) agents. We analyse the size of the behaviour space of BDI agents and show that although the intuition is correct, the factors that influence the size are not what we expected them to be; specifically, we found that the introduction of failure handling had a much larger effect on the size of the behaviour space than we expected. We also discuss the implications of these findings on the testability of BDI agents.

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  • Political marketing and political communication: the relationship revisited

    Kolovos, Ioannis; Harris, Phil (2005-11)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    Harrop (1990) perceives political marketing as being not just about political advertising, party political broadcasts and electoral speeches but covering the whole area of party positioning in the electoral market. Kavanagh (1995, 1996) sees political marketing as electioneering, i.e. as a set of strategies and tools to trace and study public opinion before and during an election campaign, to develop campaign communications and to assess their impact. A similar view is expressed by Scammell (1995).

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