639 results for Unclassified

  • Education and China’s search for modernity at the turn of the 20th century: The Japanese connection

    Gong, Hong-yu (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Christianity, English language, western education in late Qing China

    Gong, Hong-yu (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Making ancestors

    Hooper, Julian (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Impact of strengths development upon performance and professional aspirations of students in the 'helping professions'

    Ingamells, Kay (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This project was a pilot study to evaluate the usefulness of StrengthsQuestTM coaching in shaping the aspirations of students in the ‘helping professions’ in New Zealand and to investigate the potential usefulness of a new approach, provisionally known as ‘Narratives of Strengths’ to complement StrengthsQuestTM coaching. The project’s primary aim was to investigate how the usefulness of the Gallup StrengthsQuestTM could be extended by bringing narrative practice to bear on StrengthsQuestTM results. Strengthfinder® identifies an individual’s top 5 strengths based on a sophisticated online questionnaire underscored by 30 years of research. Whilst sophisticated, these Strengthfinder® descriptions become extractions from a person’s life history , leaving them free floating from the context in which they have emerged and been fostered. We saw an opportunity to extend the usefulness of Strengthfinder® results by re-siting them within the contexts of a person’s life. Our experience of narrative practice led us to hypothesize that the sophistication of the Strengthfinder® descriptions would give us a platform for an inquiry into the history of strengths that would not have been otherwise available. Our aim was to ascertain whether Clifton StrengthsQuestTM coaching and ‘Narratives of Strengths’ interviews can make a useful and unique contribution to strengths enhancement worthy of further development in a second research phase.. Our other aims were to research whether or not participation in the Strengthfinder® on its own and the Strengthfinder® together with narrative interviews, could positively support and influence the professional aspirations of social practice and nursing students and impact upon their hope, well-being and emotional engagement. A final, but more minor aim was to ascertain if particular strengths identified by the Clifton Strengthsfinder® occur especially frequently for social work, counselling or nursing students. We speculated that if a particular pattern emerged there might be possible implications for the teaching of social practice and nursing which could then be researched independently. All aspects of the project have been beneficial for the students who took part. All students who took part in the evaluations gave extremely positive accounts of their participation in the research. There were no negative findings. Transcripts of the narrative of strengths interviews indicate that students were not only able to locate their strengths and their development within their life histories but for the majority, doing so produced specific benefits. Reported results indicate themes regarding the influence of the project upon career direction, increased confidence in practice and in study and unanticipated results in their personal lives. Two draft articles have been written to date. The second article summarises the results of the research overall under the themes that emerged and also highlights the results of the narrative of strengths interviews and the seeming usefulness of different aspects of the project for assisting social practice and nursing students in making career choices. We are currently considering which journals we wish to approach. The pilot study has been effective in researching the usefulness of Strengthfinder® , Strengthfinder® coaching and narrative of strengths interviews to social practice and nursing students. The results so far indicate: • That ‘narrative of strengths interviews are a useful tool for situating strengths within life histories and produce insights which lead to change in professional and personal life and impact positively upon hope, engagement and well-being. • Merit in a larger project to further develop and research the use of narrative of strengths interviews with Strengthfinder® and/or Strengthfinder® coaching. More specifically the results indicate that this combination of approaches could be effective in supporting students in the ‘helping professions’ to refine their career aspirations, potentially leading to more effective practice in the field.

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  • Biosecurity and weed management: Taking into account the biodiversity value of woody invasive alien plant species (invertebrate identification)

    Blanchon, Dan (2010-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Domestics

    Jotti, Dorina (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Highlights • ‘Domestics’ exhibition at Unitec’s Snowwhite Gallery. • Catalogues distributed during the exhibition. • Discussions related to the exhibition theme were a valuable component throughout the time of the exhibition • Interest from other tertiary institutions to exhibit the work. Conclusion Work exhibited and accompanying written material achieved desired dialogues and further encourages ongoing discussions about the role of ‘gendered’ art in contemporary practice.

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  • Reprogramming Sunnynook as an urban transport node

    Kaza, Krystina (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Teaching narrative counselling as a transformative practice: A pilot study investigating whether student learning is akin to client experiences

    Lewis, Dorothea; Gremillion, Helen; Cheshire, Aileen (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The aims and objectives of this pilot project are to 1) develop best practices in the teaching of narrative work; 2) provide a unique and powerful lens for understanding the effectiveness of narrative therapy; and 3) identify intersections between teaching and professional practice in this field. Students in the 2009 PGDip Counselling course at Unitec were interviewed about their positive learning experiences to determine whether these experiences are akin to extant client accounts of successful therapeutic work. Similarities between these two sets of experiences would allow research on teaching practice in this field to inform understandings of effective narrative work. The researchers found that there are indeed significant similarities between these two sets of experiences. Specifically both the teaching and the practicing of successful narrative ideas entail 1) decentring “expert” knowledge; 2) centering the agency of learners (students and clients); and 3) the creation of reflective, interactive, and dialogical space. Positioning theory has emerged as a useful set of ideas for capturing these conclusions, which speak to aim/objectives #2 and #3. Aim/objective 1 will follow from publication and further research.

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  • Pacific diaspora media pilot project

    Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Breeding biology of laughing kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguinea) in New Zealand

    Perrott, John (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In the last year we have identified six nesting areas from which we have collected nest debris and behavioural observations. From this data we have identified all animal remains within the debris. In addition, we identified the New Zealand kookaburra population range margins and distribution. We have tested tracking methods and conducted nest site protection measures at the six breeding sites (e.g., protecting kookaburra nesting sites from possum damage). We have developed and distributed media and public information packs to private land owners north of Auckland and on Kawau Island to gain access to private lands used by kookaburra. To date, we have all the prerequisite information required to apply for additional external research grants and publish one paper on kookaburra nest debris and predation of native species in New Zealand forests.

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  • Development of a calibrated numerical computer model of the Raglan coast, bar and harbour

    Phillips, David (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • The financial effects of the adoption of New Zealand equivalents of International Financial Reporting Standards (NZ IFRS)

    Rainsbury, Liz (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • The experience of women with chronic illness aged between 65 to 74 years: A qualitative participatory study

    Roy, Dianne; Giddings, Lynne (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • The management of transit zone economies: Perceptions and realities

    Simpson, Ken (2009-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Stained carpet: A case study of the collapse of Feltex Carpets Ltd

    Slessor, Andrew (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Modelling and monitoring the Unitec standard house to improve sustainability and indoor environmental quality.

    Tait, Robert (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    A testing facility has been established on the Unitec campus which allows monitoring of temperatures and humidity levels in a standard 3-bedroom house, operating as a control, to compare with the performance a second house modified with alternative materials or construction techniques. This appears to be very rare for thermal testing, with most experiments being carried out at an elemental level (ie individual materials within a laboratory setting), or in situ on a small section of construction as part of a larger building. A pilot study was completed to ensure that the monitoring process was functioning appropriately, and data collection commenced in December of the first test case, investigating the performance of a high-spec glazing unit to replace standard double-glazing. Initial findings indicate that the high-spec glazing makes a significant improvement in the thermal comfort of the house, which confirms results from laboratory-based materials tests. Monitoring is ongoing, and further analysis will provide more detailed evaluation of the benefits provided by the glazing in terms of year-round temperature performance and any resulting energy savings. In parallel with the physical testing of the house performance, computer simulations have been used to model the theoretical performance, and test the accuracy and ease of use of commonly used environmental modeling software. This part of the project has proven more difficult than expected, and has not yet produced results with the desired accuracy to compare against the monitored data. However, the difficulties experienced have provided an insight into potential problems and improvements that need to be addressed before these systems can be used more widely by practitioners.

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  • Design for an energy regeneration system with an air motor in a golf cart

    Qi, Tom; Hawkins, David (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • A more sustainable hull form

    Wilson, Richard; Chiappini, Cristiana; Flitta, Isaac (2011-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The aim of the project was to find a planing powerboat hull form capable of being pushed through the water more easily than existing hull forms and yet which still maintains, or even improves on practical performance factors such as sea keeping ability, stability, and directional stability. The speed most suited to test our hull shape is in the speed range 25 knots and under, a practical range for the general power boating public. There is some education required to have the power boating public understand the economy advantage of not carrying more power/weight than necessary.

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  • Prevalence of internal parasites of Oligosoma infrapunctatum on Mokoia Island

    Schragen, Sabina; Perrott, John (2011-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    One five day trip to Mokoia Island was planned for December 2010 and successfully completed in this research period. We were able to catch 30 skinks and collect two faecal samples. However, because of heavy rain we were not able to collect any blood samples of diagnostic value. We discovered an external parasite which was identified by Allen Heath AgResearch as Neotrombicula sphenodonti . This mite has not previously been described on Oligosoma infrapuncatum and is of interest for herpetologist, entomologists and ecologists nationally and internationally. No eggs of Nematodes were discovered, the methodology for the extraction of nematode eggs from ethanol preserved faeces needs further testing to confirm that we are not seeing false negative results. Reinvestigation of previously taken blood samples revealed that there are some interesting findings which after discussing with Dr Richard Jacob-Hoff, New Zealand Centre for Conservation Medicine (NZCCM) need further investigation. Again these blood samples taken in 2008 were taken in the rain and are not of diagnostic value. John Perrott and Sabina Schragen presented the research results from 2008-2010 at the biannually conference of the Society for Research on Amphibians and Reptiles in New Zealand. The abstracts are attached and will be published in the New Zealand Journal of Zoology later this year. Please note that the discovery of the mite is not mentioned in the abstract as was found at the time of writing.

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  • Investigation into the psychological and physical effects of participating in a mass “depopulation” operation

    Dale, Arnja (2011-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Worldwide, animal welfare investigations result in the discovery of commercial farming operations where large numbers of animals are suffering requiring quick and humane euthanasia. These events called “depopulation” operations are likely to be a traumatic experience for the personnel involved. In 2008, 13 Animal Welfare Investigation students voluntarily participated in a depopulation operation carried out by Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF) and the New Zealand Food Safety Authority (NZFSA), performing manual euthanasia, involving a mass number of poultry (5000 chickens) conducted to mitigate current and future suffering. Questionnaire evaluation of the psychological and physical effects experienced as a result of participating in this depopulation operation was conducted. The majority of students had an experience where the euthanasia technique used did not effectively kill the chicken (77%). 62% indicated that having leather gloves, a broiler suit and a mask was helpful in detaching themselves from the situation. During the operation the following physical and emotional symptoms were experienced (moderate-extreme); emotionally switched off (77%), anger (62%), sweating (53%), physical pain (53%), disgust (46%), extreme shaking (38%), grief (38%) and had difficulty eating lunch (38%). 69% did not find that the euthanasing of the birds become easier throughout the day. 85% now view chickens differently, however none regretted participating in the operation. The majority (88%) felt that the blame for the mass euthanasia lay with the farmer and that they were “helping the animals”. During the first few days following the operation 62% experienced intrusive memories and flashbacks (moderate-extreme). Some students continued to experience emotional responses 4 months and 12 months post the operation however this was only in one or two cases.

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