660 results for Unclassified

  • LAB: Research Theatre Company (part two) - Creating a dialogue with the audience

    Ilgenfritz, Pedro (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The research project LAB: Research Theatre Company (part two) - Creating a Dialogue with the Audience was designed to investigate the dramaturgical development of the theatre show Alfonsina (and the theme of immigration) through audience feedback. The show was performed in four different places/contexts and selected audience members were invited to reflect and to express their reading/understanding of plot, theatre language, social and political questions and the philosophy of the company. The research revealed that all focus groups perceived the dialectics of the immigration experience and its contradictions in different degrees. Our goal was to see how this conversation with the audience could become a further step towards the development of the story and the technical side of the performance. In conclusion, the project was successful in achieving the desired result. The script of Alfonsina was adjusted several times as a result of the conversations with the audience; the audience was almost a co-creator in a sense that they were active in participating in the process of developing the show.

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  • Ancient imagery: Digital visualisations of the Auckland isthmus

    Egginton, Zane (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Digitising the complex form

    Egginton, Zane (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The intention of this project was (and still is) to explore the possibilities of using complex and seemingly organic forms in a typical digital workflow for designers, be they Landscape architects, Architects, sculptors or product designers. This includes the capturing, creation, generation, and visualisation of these forms as well as the potentialities and limitations of different techniques. For the ANZASCA conference I collaborated with two other staff members Nikolay Popov who has an interest in cellular automata and Brett Orams who is has an interest in procedural modelling. Together we wrote a very detailed paper that I presented at the conference. I’m currently looking for other conferences to present more detailed studies of certain aspects of this original paper (which was very well received).

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  • Corrective measures: Actual and virtual interactive narrative

    Jowsey, Susan (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Within the framework of the project these outcomes have been broadly addressed, however, the projects focus expanded in response to the lived experience of the fellowship at the International Studio and Curatorial Programme. The fellowship at the ISCP in Brooklyn, New York, provided a significant amount of time to devote to both the practice of art production and to the collaborative process. The nature of the artwork shifted in both concept and means of production with the result that the work now has several significant strands occurring simultaneously. These strands are interwoven but also exist as discrete practices - the interactive potential of the photograph, the object and moving image is still under exploration, but has become a key feature in all new proposals, of which currently there are proposals awaiting response in Berlin, Manhattan, Istanbul and Bulgaria. Whilst it is planned to continue to explore the potential of viewer interaction in the work, the integration of object, static image and moving image in a single installations has allowed us to broaden the narrative potential of pieces produced. Alongside the interactive body of work sits the static image, which has developed significantly, the fellowship provided an opportunity to work exclusively within a studio context, the decision not to engage in the American landscape but to situate all the portraiture in a neutral environment was planned from the outset, however, the potential of this decision to allow for image manipulate was not fully understood until approximately 3 months into the fellowship. The use of a black background has enabled digital construction and reassembling to occur, putting in flux the state of relativity occupied by the protagonists being photographed. This freedom from the landscape has two functions, it removes the image from the limitations of site specificity and it removes the impetus to perform, at any given moment the narrative, by this I mean we do not have to predetermine the relationship, rather are constructed in post production. This transformation allows imagery shot at different times to exist in temporal relativity - for example retrospectively shot imagery and contemporary images can exist in the same moment as one. To this end work can be construct work in a non linear manner and is no longer constrained by time and understanding, the narrative is now able to bend and flex in response to shifts in its telling. This mode of working reflects the interactive and iterative ideas already present in the work. The third element that has occurred is also interactive in yet another sense. It involves the addition of elements directly onto or into the surface of the photograph by ripping and stitching the surface of the image. Here found imagery, drawing, old photographs, materials such as wool, clothing, plaster, have been used to disrupt the surface of the portrait. Altering the narrative potential of the image and transforming it into a haptic experience. Each of these developments can be attributed directly to the period of sustained practice able to be achieved by the six month fellowship at the ISCP. Highlights of this time were the Open Days Event at the ISCP which is a four day event with a large Opening to which dignitaries from many different countries are invited. [There are 30 artists at the ISCP at any one time who are drawn from all over the world: Europe, America, Asia and Australia and New Zealand] The Open Days achieved for the first time last year, a listing in the New York Times, What’s On. Around 2000 people attend the open days making it an important time for meeting people and discussing the work. A widely circulated broadsheet is produced with photographs of artists work and a small statement to coincide with this event. Other highlights were being selected for an International peer reviewed Photography Exhibition to be held in Chelsea Manhattan, at the Joy Wai Gallery in the Spring of this year. A full colour A4 sized catalogue has been produced to accompany this exhibition. Work produced at the ISCP was also selected in a juried exhibition in Chicago at the ARC Gallery. [School of the art institute of Chicago] This exhibition was held in February 2011. A major quality assured exhibition showcasing the work produced during the ISCP fellowship will open at the Galleries of Contemporary Art run by the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs on the 29th of April 2011. My co-researcher Assoc. Prof Marcus Williams and myself were invited to give talks to the students at the Tisch School New York, Georgia State University and Rochester Institute of Technology, Parsons New School New York. We were interviewed by William Pym, Asia Art Pacific Magazines managing editor, for a new web based project the magazine is working on based on artists working abroad for a period of time. To be launched 2011. We participated in a number of artists projects at the ISCP, one of the key features of an international fellowship is the ability to meet and work with artist from all over the world and to maintain a relationship and network with these people. In conclusion the time spent on this fellowship was important in furthering the development of a framework for both the narrative and the integration of multi media into the working process of F4. Further to this I have been accepted to present a paper of at the 6th International Conference on the Arts in Society in May 2011 at the Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Berlin, Germany. I have just received notification of selection for the Kaunas Biennial in Lithuania, an International juried art biennial to be held in September 2011.

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  • Whaia te iti kahurangi: Efficacy, agency, achievement and success in the tertiary sector: Focus on students and parents from Pasifika communities

    Marat, Deepa; Latu, Savae; Aumua, Linda; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Talakai, Malia; Sun, Kang (2009-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The present study is situated in Unitec Institute of Technology, a dynamic tertiary institution in New Zealand, catering to the needs of a large and diverse student population enrolled in courses ranging from certificate level to doctoral programmes. Annual summative evaluations of achievement of students reveal ethnicity based disparities in the rate of success and retention of undergraduate students, with Pasifika students positioned in the lower levels as compared to mainstream and Maori students in both Unitec campuses. In this research project, the reasons underpinning this disparity is assessed from the context of efficacy and agency of students, two constructs which correlate with academic achievement. Led by a research design underpinned by Kaupapa Maori, Pasifika, mainstream methodologies, and ancient philosophies, the findings are reported mainly from the perspectives of student and parent participants from Pasifika communities. Although an inclusive approach of inviting tertiary students across all ethnicities that had enrolled for a qualification programme to participate was the norm, the central aim was to unravel some of the challenges faced by participants from the Pasifika community which precluded optimal achievement. Unitec Centre for Pacific approved Tertiary Education Commission funding for this research. Pasifika parents with teenagers enrolled in secondary schools or/ and with children in the tertiary sector were also invited to participate in focus groups to share their perspectives on higher education, and how they coped with emerging challenges. A mixed-methods approach was used to assess self-efficacy, agency, and perceptions of success. Findings reveal students in the tertiary sector reporting high levels of efficacy. Agency and perception of success seems to be more collective in nature, with a sense of responsibility towards oneself and one’s family acting as agentic forces to succeed in the tertiary sector. Students are intent upon setting goals, using learning strategies, taking responsibility for their learning and attaining them. Teacher participation in this research was almost non-existent, despite being part of the research design. This was a major limitation of the study, since there is no empirical data on culturally sensitive teaching strategies in use. The findings also capture the critical role of family, teachers, support staff, and peers in student achievement and success in bicultural and multi-cultural tertiary education context.

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  • Titiro whakamuri, hoki whakamua. We are the future, the present and the past: Caring for self, others and the environment in early years’ teaching and learning

    Ritchie, Jenny; Duhn, Iris; Rau, Cheryl; Craw, Janita (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This project focuses on global issues of ecological sustainability in a variety of national/local early childhood contexts. The research aims to illuminate, document, explore, and explain possibilities for early childhood pedagogies that reflect and enact an ethic of care for self, others, and the environment. The project draws from both kaupapa Maori and western perspectives.

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  • The everyday collective laboratory: The old North Shore

    Woodruffe, Paul (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The project’s aims were to identify areas and structures of special heritage character on the North Shore of Auckland City, research and document the history of the site(s) identified and establish contacts with the local community, especially the community groups that are involved in the preservation or heritage architecture and landscapes. The approach taken was one of gathering information and photographic images, both archival and commissioned, making contact with stakeholders and producing artworks based on these resources. The most important findings can be grouped into two categories; the first is the discovery that three heritage sites and four heritage buildings can be linked to create a heritage walking trail, that if created would protect the sites and lead to a restoration and design project of regional significance. The second is that any project that is based on an inclusive and consultative program with the local community has to be given a reasonably long timetable, and has to be designed to fit in with local meetings and events. This project is achieving something rather than has achieved something, as it is through necessity ongoing into 2011, but it is successfully establishing a methodology for collaborative inter-disciplinary projects designed to work within communities regarding disputed and neglected sites. It has proven the importance of using a mixture of advocacy and consultation as a precursor to design when working within communities on sensitive sites. The conclusion of this project required two stages, to complete it to the stage a final design project that demonstrated complete engagement with the local community, Iwi and stakeholders could take place. The first stage was a public exhibition of the research findings and the artwork based on it. The exhibition allowed the community to see the findings as a celebration of their environment and as a document of work they can contribute to. This document is being used to lobby for political will to protect, restore and design a solution to create the walkway through presentations to Local Boards and finally the Auckland Council. There is now a body of work advocating for the sites that is being to be placed into cyberspace as living resource for future researchers.

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  • Urban reprogramming at Sunnynook: Can a landscape strategy for an urban design project provide satisfactory planning direction for a local body?

    Griffiths, Pete (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Centre plans, analysis documents, and urban renewal documents, appear on council’s shelves and archives under many names. An examination of the contents page, in these documents, reveals a seemingly full and rigorous analytical study of existing site conditions has been carried out, but on closer inspection some areas of weaknesses are revealed. For example, often an analysis of the open space or parks and reserve networks are undertaken, which consist of a list of these areas…and that’s all. This project aims to make a thorough investigation into the open green spaces that populate the immediate vicinity of the Sunnynook town centre, with the aim of providing some initial concepts for the reprogramming of Sunnynook town centre. This reprogramming will be entirely driven by the inherent potentials of the ecological diversity of the open green spaces. An acknowledgement is made at this point that other important factors such as social conditions, economic and political factors, and other necessary components of the site have been sidelined in order to focus entirely on the potentials of the ecological diversity mentioned earlier.

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  • A living curricula: Conversations about learning and teaching

    Marshall, Steven (2011-05)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Unitec New Zealand’s ‘Living Curricula’ is both an Academic Strategy and an aspiration for a unique institutional culture. The Department of Performing and Screen Arts has developed course curriculum that crosses discipline boundaries and exploits collaborative opportunity to leverage economical solutions to ever-growing sector and system constrains. A living curriculum is defined not as the information content of a program, but rather as the programs’ learning experience (Unitec, 2010). Living curricula learning experiences emphasize the links and application of theory/knowledge and work experience/practice. Knowledge is both applied in practice and drawn from practice. Therefore the process of developing a living curricula involves ‘conversations’ about enquiry, knowledge, practice, learning and teaching approaches which focus on engagement between and among learners, teachers, practitioners, communities, scholars, and with self and texts. Embedded within a ‘living curricula’ is the concept of Ako, a Maori word which means to learn, study, instruct, teach or advise. Ako describes a teaching and learning relationship where the educator is also learning from the student and where educators’ practices are informed by the latest research and are both deliberate and reflective.

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  • Status of the spotted shag (Stictocarbo punctatus) in the Hauraki Gulf

    Galbraith, Mel (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This project studied aspects of the population of spotted shag (Stictocarbo punctatus) that is considered to be in decline in the Hauraki Gulf. The aim of the project was to initiate an update of population data, a necessary precursor to future ecological research intended to inform management of this species and Gulf seabirds in general. Population data was gathered through field surveys of islands of the inner Hauraki Gulf. The project has updated aspects of population data for the species, with the general conclusion that the population is stable, although with fewer breeding colonies than when last surveyed in 1970. The need for further field surveys was also identified. The project findings are to be disseminated as “preliminary results” at the 2012 Ornithological Society of NZ conference.

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  • Landscapes for life (Stage 2) – An investigation of opportunities for aesthetic improvement and biodiversity enhancement for living roofs in New Zealand

    Davies, Renee (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Results from stage 2 of this project have shown that a New Zealand indigenous extensive living roof plant community can provide the basic microhabitat variables required to support lizards with the exception of humidity. Although existing vegetation will provide refuge from predators and modifies temperature and humidity, the designed prosthetic habitat creates humid micro-sites (refuges), allowing a trial translocation of native skinks and ethics approval has now been gained for a trial relocation to occur. The results of stage 2 are now providing a solid basis, including comparison of food species from Shakespear and those found on the roof, of the research. Vegetation cover on the roof has significantly increased in the last year (over 70% cover) which provides further enhancement of potential success for the relocation. Project highlights: • Collaboration with Auckland Council to gain gut contents to analyse to support food source analysis for the relocation and results confirming food source on roof matches with preferred species being eaten by skink. • Feedback from international conference which confirmed that a relocation of lizards has occurred in Australia onto a living roof with great success which will support our permit application with DOC. • A site visit from English living roof expert who has said the living roof at Waitakere is his favourite living roof internationally and is supporting further dissemination of the research at the Green Roof world congress in the Netherlands in September.

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  • Enhancing the learning of professionalism in the context of Web 2.0.

    Gasquoine, Sue (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Thus far this project has involved collaboration nationally and now internationally and is inter-disciplinary in nature. The recruitment strategy used has proved ineffective so while not enough data has been collected to justify analysis, an unanticipated outcome has been the recent inclusion of the international partner & the need to be innovative with recruiting participants. Data collection has now recommenced.

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  • Extension of use of action research as real and applied research for improvement of teaching and learning at Unitec

    Smith, Mark (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The Action Research Project in 2011 involved a cluster of 12 action research (AR) projects across 6 departments at Unitec – Languages, Sport, Te Puna Ako, the Library, Foundation Studies and Music. Each project was an individual piece of action research, had specific research questions relevant to the project topic and had its own findings. Each was subject to the normal ethics approval process at Unitec. A meta-evaluation of the effectiveness of action research as a professional development strategy was also carried out. It was encouraging to see so many first time researchers taking this initial step into investigating their teaching and learning. The results of the meta-evaluation indicated the benefits of this sort of professional development. The other main aim of the project was to ensure that literacy and numeracy interventions were designed and implemented in a step toward ensuring these became business as usual. This was achieved across all the projects. Another achievement of the project was the cross-disciplinary nature of much of the research. Breaking away from silos saw collaboration between music lecturers and literacy experts, automotive mechanics and academic advisors, lecturers and e-learning advisors, the Departments of Architecture and Languages, Te Puna Ako and the Department of Sport. Finally, because of the number of projects, a layer of mentors was created to ensure that assistance was available to all researchers. This built capability in the Academic Literacies team which has allowed the project to continue in 2012 despite the departure of Eileen Piggot-Irvine.

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  • Modelling and monitoring the Unitec standard house to improve sustainability and indoor environmental quality

    Tait, Robert (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This project takes a two-pronged approach to investigate issues around the thermal performance and internal environment of New Zealand housing. The first stage of measuring has been completed and the BIM model successfully integrated with the simulation software. Unitec has a Faculty of Technology and Built Environment facility for research driven learning in the New Zealand building industry.

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  • A micro-study of Greek female immigrants to New Zealand in the 60s

    Tsoulis, Athina (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The research aim of this research project was to explore the migratory experiences of a distinct group of single women who left Greece en masse to undertake domestic work in New Zealand in the early 1960’s. This was an unprecedented occurrence for traditional Greek culture, which, at the time, was essentially patriarchal and women did not travel, far less live away from home without the supervision of a male or older member of the family. Who were these women, why and how did they persuade their families to allow them to leave, what impact did the freedom and difference of western culture have upon these unchaperoned women and how did it change their lives were some of the questions we sought to discover. The documentary form was chosen to complement the fifteen interviews of representatives of this group we undertook as part of the Ministry of Culture and Heritage’s oral history grant and which will be shortly lodged in the Alexander Turnbull Library for the benefit of future researchers. What became very evident was the devastating impact that World War II had upon the Cretan population, particularly in the west coast in the mountainous regions behind Hania. This was largely due to the punishment meted out by the Germans retaliating against the support the local Cretan population gave to the British and New Zealand forces engaged in the struggle. The Cretans paid dearly for their support and fathers and adult brothers were rounded up systematically and shot or imprisoned in unbearable conditions for long periods, and dwellings and personal possessions were destroyed leaving women and children scrabbling for food and basic necessities. The grind of daily life which had little relief for many of these women who did not know much childhood pleasure, constantly helping the family in daily survival led to many of the women who decided to emigrate long for a better way of life. Many of them resented never enjoying the fruits of their labour or control on how it was spent as money went to male members of the family to dispense with. Many were influenced by the stories coming from the Greek diaspora and their adventurous spirit was aroused as they rejected the lives proscribed for female womanhood in their local environments. The abruptness of the migration experience, severing with all that is familiar and going into the unknown was a traumatic experience no matter how much the women desired to leave. And things were never the same. Community was disrupted and attempts to reclaim this were successful as the new immigrants clung together and recreated familiar Greek rituals and celebrations but again were disrupted as the unsettled immigrants decided to move to Australia to be part of a greater Greek community or returned back home. Visits home highlighted the disruption for these women as villages were emptied, loved ones dead or gone, villages becoming ghost towns. We found that the Greek women we interviewed were reluctant to criticise their new host country and many spoke well of how they were treated by New Zealanders. Yet the toll the migration experience had upon them and their children is quite profound.

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  • Measuring social cohesion in community settings: Case studies of pre- and post-Internet intervention

    Williams, Jocelyn (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This case study in a school community near Unitec, in Avondale, aimed to assess strategies for building social cohesion as an element in successful implementation of a community internet scheme. It focused specifically on a subsidiary goal to examine the use of social media as tools for building social cohesion. The work involved mentoring among and informal discussions and focus groups with a proportion of 31 parents who were participating in the implementation of Computers in Homes at the school. My previous research indicates a need to further investigate the role of social support among late adopter, new users of the internet, and this study is progressing that work by addressing a role for online social networking. Results, as in previous studies within Computers in Homes, reinforce the conclusion that this organization uses very effective face-to-face socialisation strategies to enhance belonging and support, but also that the Ning social network appears to be of particular appeal to parents in this situation, offering a new medium for finding support. The latter finding is encouraging and is the subject of ongoing evaluation. As detailed in other sections below, findings are emerging from copious data that still needs analyzing but has been referred to in two quality-assured publications. Considerable volumes of further analysis and commentary needs to be done and will emerge in new publications in 2012.

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  • Cool new Asia : experiencing East Asian popular culture

    Wilson, Scott (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Cool New Asia: East Asian Popular Culture in a Local Context was held at Unitec during the weekend of November 25-26th. The symposium attracted two international keynote speakers (Professor Koichi Iwabuchi and Professor Matt Allen), twenty-six speakers from both national and international tertiary environments and approximately one hundred and twenty attendees over the two days. The papers delivered covered a range of disciplines and theoretical approaches and, as was hoped, reflected a broad interdisciplinary examination, from across the humanities, of ideas pertaining to popular culture in general, Asian popular culture (of a variety of forms), in particular, and other issues related to these two including population diaspora, second-language education, representation and self-representation, and community construction, location and relocation as a result of globalisation. The weekend delivered a number of highlights; of these, the cultural performances by Madang Hannuri (a Korean performance troupe), the E-Pacs Lion Dance Team, and Hokushin Shinoh Ryu Iaido (a Japanese martial arts troupe) were the most popular and engaging. However, beyond the world of cultural performance, the symposium’s chief success, we believe, was that it (a) successfully identified a hitherto overlooked area of study, (b) provided a forum for a rigorous examination of issues pertaining to these, and (c) offers an opportunity to continue this exploration as the Cool New Asia project moves into its second phase. This second phase – discussed in the initial application for funding – refers to the manner with which Drs. Kolesova and Wilson are working to develop concrete research outcomes out of the material generated by the symposium. More information about this is provided below. The symposium organizers wish to extend their enormous gratitude and thanks to the URC committee for making such a successful event possible. We would particularly like to acknowledge the incredible help provided by Brenda Massey.

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  • The everyday collective laboratory: Suburban interventions

    Woodruffe, Paul (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The highlights of the project were the discoveries made into inter-disciplinary research methodology and strategies for small-scale design interventions in advocating for community environmental projects. The approach was to continue to develop relationships with the community organizations that I had worked with in the previous research period in 2010. Previous findings made clear the necessity for small-scale inexpensive interventions to inform and advocate for initiatives identified by the collaboration between our researchers and the community. Two methods were considered to be the most effective. Firstly the use of QR Codes placed within the landscape that would direct visitors to both the research findings, and the community websites created to support the cultural activities existing within the neighbourhood. Secondly the use of a 30 edition lithographic print that articulated both the history of the subject sites and the agreed concept to develop a heritage walkway, this edition was distributed amongst the community stakeholders and decision makers in local government. Auckland Council Parks and Heritage expressed an interest in trialling the use of QR Codes in a test area, and we are having on-going discussions on this. Both of these interventions proved to have great potential to inexpensively deliver the ability to both record and disseminate information discreetly, as well as to lobby for legal protection, restoration and present design solutions for a specific environmental issue.

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  • Forget failure - Focus on success to plan for lasting change

    Marshall, Steven (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Report on the self-access centre at Unitec

    Burns, Trish; Martin-Blaker, Jeannie (1998-05)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This report outlines the background of self-access learning, describes the situation of the existing Self-Access Centre at UNITEC, highlights the characteristics of the leading Self-Access Centres in New Zealand and around the world, and makes recommendations regarding the future development of the Centre at Unitec in the areas of physical layout, systems, resources, services, and staffing. It presents a range of options regarding the future location of the SAC, with the implications involved in each.

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