302 results for Working or discussion paper, 1990

  • A practical guide to GMM (with applications to option pricing)

    Arnold, Tom; Crack, Timothy (1999-10)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The full text of this document is only available from the Social Science Research Network. Please use the related link to access the full text.

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  • Tinkering with ticks: choosing minimum price variation for US equity markets (1996 version)

    Crack, Timothy (1997-02)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The full text of this document is only available from the Social Science Research Network. Please use the related link to access the full text.

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  • GIS, expert systems and interoperability

    Lilburne, Linda; Benwell, George L; Buick, Roz (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Part of the GeoComputation '96 Special Issue 96/25; follow the "related link" to download the entire collection as a single document.

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  • Dynamic evolving fuzzy neural networks with `m-out-of-n' activation nodes for on-line adaptive systems

    Kasabov, Nikola; Song, Qun (1999-03)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The paper introduces a new type of evolving fuzzy neural networks (EFuNNs), denoted as mEFuNNs, for on-line learning and their applications for dynamic time series analysis and prediction. mEFuNNs evolve through incremental, hybrid (supervised/unsupervised), on-line learning, like the EFuNNs. They can accommodate new input data, including new features, new classes, etc. through local element tuning. New connections and new neurons are created during the operation of the system. At each time moment the output vector of a mEFuNN is calculated based on the m-most activated rule nodes. Two approaches are proposed: (1) using weighted fuzzy rules of Zadeh-Mamdani type; (2) using Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy rules that utilise dynamically changing and adapting values for the inference parameters. It is proved that the mEFuNNs can effectively learn complex temporal sequences in an adaptive way and outperform EFuNNs, ANFIS and other neural network and hybrid models. Rules can be inserted, extracted and adjusted continuously during the operation of the system. The characteristics of the mEFuNNs are illustrated on two bench-mark dynamic time series data, as well as on two real case studies for on-line adaptive control and decision making. Aggregation of rule nodes in evolved mEFuNNs can be achieved through fuzzy C-means clustering algorithm which is also illustrated on the bench mark data sets. The regularly trained and aggregated in an on-line, self-organised mode mEFuNNs perform as well, or better, than the mEFuNNs that use fuzzy C-means clustering algorithm for off-line rule node generation on the same data set.

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  • Planning and matchmaking in a multi-agent system for software integration

    Diaz, Aurora; Cranefield, Stephen; Purvis, Martin (1997-06)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Computer users employ a collection of software tools to support their day-to-day work. Often the software environment is dynamic with new tools being added as they become available and removed as they become obsolete or outdated. In today’s systems, the burden of coordinating the use of these disparate tools, remembering the correct sequence of commands, and incorporating new and modified programs into the daily work pattern lies with the user. This paper describes a multi-agent system, DALEKS, that assists users in utilizing diverse software tools for their everyday work. It manages work and information flow by providing a coordination layer that selects the appropriate tool(s) to use for each of the user’s tasks and automates the flow of information between them. This enables the user to be concerned more with what has to be done, rather than with the specifics of how to access tools and information. Here we describe the system architecture of DALEKS and illustrate it with an example in university course administration.

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  • Cadastral “reform”—at what cost to developing countries?

    Ezigbalike, I. Chukwudozie; Benwell, George L (1993-11)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that this is a searchable PDF derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source document. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.

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  • Local government GIS in New Zealand since 1989

    Marr, Andrew; Benwell, George L (1995-09)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This paper draws together existing data with recent survey results and compares the development of local government GIS with the evolution of Information Systems (IS). These comparisons are made using the philosophy that organisational GIS can be modelled. Using this model, various stages of GIS maturity are evaluated.

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  • Software forensics: extending authorship analysis techniques to computer programs

    Gray, Andrew; Sallis, Philip; MacDonell, Stephen (1997-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that this is a searchable PDF derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source document. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.

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  • Environments for viewpoint representations

    Stanger, Nigel; Pascoe, Richard (1997-06)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Modelling the structure of data is an important part of any system analysis project. One problem that can arise is that there may be many differing viewpoints among the various groups that are involved in a project. Each of these viewpoints describes a perspective on the phenomenon being modelled. In this paper, we focus on the representation of developer viewpoints, and in particular on how multiple viewpoint representations may be used for database design. We examine the issues that arise when transforming between different viewpoint representations, and describe an architecture for implementing a database design environment based on these concepts.

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  • Software metrics data analysis—Exploring the relative performance of some commonly used modeling techniques

    Gray, Andrew; MacDonell, Stephen (1999-06)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Whilst some software measurement research has been unquestionably successful, other research has struggled to enable expected advances in project and process management. Contributing to this lack of advancement has been the incidence of inappropriate or non-optimal application of various model-building procedures. This obviously raises questions over the validity and reliability of any results obtained as well as the conclusions that may have been drawn regarding the appropriateness of the techniques in question. In this paper we investigate the influence of various data set characteristics and the purpose of analysis on the effectiveness of four model-building techniques---three statistical methods and one neural network method. In order to illustrate the impact of data set characteristics, three separate data sets, drawn from the literature, are used in this analysis. In terms of predictive accuracy, it is shown that no one modeling method is best in every case. Some consideration of the characteristics of data sets should therefore occur before analysis begins, so that the most appropriate modeling method is then used. Moreover, issues other than predictive accuracy may have a significant influence on the selection of model-building methods. These issues are also addressed here and a series of guidelines for selecting among and implementing these and other modeling techniques is discussed.

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  • An agent-based architecture for software tool coordination

    Cranefield, Stephen; Purvis, Martin (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This paper presents a practical multi-agent architecture for assisting users to coordinate the use of both special and general purpose software tools for performing tasks in a given problem domain. The architecture is open and extensible being based on the techniques of agent-based software interoperability (ABSI), where each tool is encapsulated by a KQML-speaking agent. The work reported here adds additional facilities for the user to describe the problem domain, the tasks that are commonly performed in that domain and the ways in which various software tools are commonly used by the user. Together, these features provide the computer with a degree of autonomy in the user's problem domain in order to help the user achieve tasks through the coordinated use of disparate software tools. This research focuses on the representational and planning capabilities required to extend the existing benefits of the ABSI architecture to include domain-level problem-solving skills. In particular, the paper proposes a number of standard ontologies that are required for this type of problem, and discusses a number of issues related to planning the coordinated use of agent-encapsulated tools.

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  • Privacy enhancing technology

    Wolfe, Henry B (1997-07)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

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  • Spatial-temporal adaptation in evolving fuzzy neural networks for on-line adaptive phoneme recognition

    Kasabov, Nikola; Watts, Michael (1999-03)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

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  • A comparison of alternatives to regression analysis as model building techniques to develop predictive equations for software metrics

    Gray, Andrew; MacDonell, Stephen (1996-03)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The almost exclusive use of regression analysis to derive predictive equations for software development metrics found in papers published before 1990 has recently been complemented by increasing numbers of studies using non-traditional methods, such as neural networks, fuzzy logic models, case-based reasoning systems, rule-based systems, and regression trees. There has also been an increasing level of sophistication in the regression-based techniques used, including robust regression methods, factor analysis, resampling methods, and more effective and efficient validation procedures. This paper examines the implications of using these alternative methods and provides some recommendations as to when they may be appropriate. A comparison between standard linear regression, robust regression, and the alternative techniques is also made in terms of their modelling capabilities with specific reference to software metrics.

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  • Wildlife population analysis with GIS: conservation management of royal albatross

    McLennan, Bruce; Purvis, Martin; Robertson, C J R (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Part of the GeoComputation '96 Special Issue 96/25; follow the "related link" to download the entire collection as a single document.

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  • Agent modelling with Petri nets

    Purvis, Martin; Cranefield, Stephen (1996-03)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The use of intelligent software agents is a modelling paradigm that is gaining increasing attention in the applications of distributed systems. This paper identifies essential characteristics of agents and shows how they can be mapped into a coloured Petri net representation so that the coordination of activities both within agents and between interacting agents can be visualised and analysed. The detailed structure and behaviour of an individual agent in terms of coloured Petri nets is presented, as well as a description of how such agents interact. A key notion is that the essential functional components of an agent are explicitly represented by means of coloured Petri net constructs in this representation.

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  • Usenet newsgroups’ profile analysis utilising standard and non-standard statistical methods

    Sallis, Philip; Kassabova, Diana (1997-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that this is a searchable PDF derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source document. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.

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  • Special issue: GeoComputation ’96

    (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that parts of this document were derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source documents. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.

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  • Reasonable security safeguards for small to medium organisations

    Wolfe, Henry B (1996-06)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that this is a searchable PDF derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source document. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.

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  • The use of a metadata repository in spatial database development

    Cockcroft, Sophie (1996-02)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Database schemas currently used to define spatial databases are deficient in that they do not incorporate facilities to specify business rules/integrity constraints. This shortcoming has been noted by Günther and Lamberts [Günther & Lamberts, 1994] who commented that geographical information systems (GIS) do not generally offer any functionality to preserve semantic integrity. It is desirable that this functionality be incorporated for reasons of consistency and so that an estimate of the accuracy of data entry can be made. Research into constraints upon spatial relationships at the conceptual level is well documented. A number of researchers have shown that the transition from conceptual to logical spatial data models is possible [Firns, 1994; Hadzilacos & Tryfona, 1995]. The algorithmic accomplishment of this transition is a subject of current research. This paper presents one approach to incorporating spatial business rules in spatially referenced database schemas by means of a repository. It is demonstrated that the repository has an important role to play in spatial data management and in particular automatic schema generation for spatially referenced databases.

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