67 results for Working or discussion paper, 1996

  • GIS, expert systems and interoperability

    Lilburne, Linda; Benwell, George L; Buick, Roz (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Part of the GeoComputation '96 Special Issue 96/25; follow the "related link" to download the entire collection as a single document.

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  • An agent-based architecture for software tool coordination

    Cranefield, Stephen; Purvis, Martin (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This paper presents a practical multi-agent architecture for assisting users to coordinate the use of both special and general purpose software tools for performing tasks in a given problem domain. The architecture is open and extensible being based on the techniques of agent-based software interoperability (ABSI), where each tool is encapsulated by a KQML-speaking agent. The work reported here adds additional facilities for the user to describe the problem domain, the tasks that are commonly performed in that domain and the ways in which various software tools are commonly used by the user. Together, these features provide the computer with a degree of autonomy in the user's problem domain in order to help the user achieve tasks through the coordinated use of disparate software tools. This research focuses on the representational and planning capabilities required to extend the existing benefits of the ABSI architecture to include domain-level problem-solving skills. In particular, the paper proposes a number of standard ontologies that are required for this type of problem, and discusses a number of issues related to planning the coordinated use of agent-encapsulated tools.

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  • A comparison of alternatives to regression analysis as model building techniques to develop predictive equations for software metrics

    Gray, Andrew; MacDonell, Stephen (1996-03)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The almost exclusive use of regression analysis to derive predictive equations for software development metrics found in papers published before 1990 has recently been complemented by increasing numbers of studies using non-traditional methods, such as neural networks, fuzzy logic models, case-based reasoning systems, rule-based systems, and regression trees. There has also been an increasing level of sophistication in the regression-based techniques used, including robust regression methods, factor analysis, resampling methods, and more effective and efficient validation procedures. This paper examines the implications of using these alternative methods and provides some recommendations as to when they may be appropriate. A comparison between standard linear regression, robust regression, and the alternative techniques is also made in terms of their modelling capabilities with specific reference to software metrics.

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  • Wildlife population analysis with GIS: conservation management of royal albatross

    McLennan, Bruce; Purvis, Martin; Robertson, C J R (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Part of the GeoComputation '96 Special Issue 96/25; follow the "related link" to download the entire collection as a single document.

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  • Agent modelling with Petri nets

    Purvis, Martin; Cranefield, Stephen (1996-03)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The use of intelligent software agents is a modelling paradigm that is gaining increasing attention in the applications of distributed systems. This paper identifies essential characteristics of agents and shows how they can be mapped into a coloured Petri net representation so that the coordination of activities both within agents and between interacting agents can be visualised and analysed. The detailed structure and behaviour of an individual agent in terms of coloured Petri nets is presented, as well as a description of how such agents interact. A key notion is that the essential functional components of an agent are explicitly represented by means of coloured Petri net constructs in this representation.

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  • Special issue: GeoComputation ’96

    (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that parts of this document were derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source documents. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.

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  • Reasonable security safeguards for small to medium organisations

    Wolfe, Henry B (1996-06)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that this is a searchable PDF derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source document. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.

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  • The use of a metadata repository in spatial database development

    Cockcroft, Sophie (1996-02)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Database schemas currently used to define spatial databases are deficient in that they do not incorporate facilities to specify business rules/integrity constraints. This shortcoming has been noted by Günther and Lamberts [Günther & Lamberts, 1994] who commented that geographical information systems (GIS) do not generally offer any functionality to preserve semantic integrity. It is desirable that this functionality be incorporated for reasons of consistency and so that an estimate of the accuracy of data entry can be made. Research into constraints upon spatial relationships at the conceptual level is well documented. A number of researchers have shown that the transition from conceptual to logical spatial data models is possible [Firns, 1994; Hadzilacos & Tryfona, 1995]. The algorithmic accomplishment of this transition is a subject of current research. This paper presents one approach to incorporating spatial business rules in spatially referenced database schemas by means of a repository. It is demonstrated that the repository has an important role to play in spatial data management and in particular automatic schema generation for spatially referenced databases.

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  • Applying soft systems methodology to multimedia systems requirements analysis

    Butt, Da’oud; Fletcher, Tim; MacDonell, Stephen; Norris, Brian; Wong, B L William (1996-10)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that this is a searchable PDF derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source document. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.

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  • Politics and techniques of data encryption

    Wolfe, Henry B (1996-06)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that this is a searchable PDF derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source document. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.

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  • Process management for geographical information system development

    MacDonell, Stephen; Benwell, George L (1996-03)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The controlled management of software processes, an area of ongoing research in the business systems domain, is equally important in the development of geographical information systems (GIS). Appropriate software processes must be defined, used and managed in order to ensure that, as much as possible, systems are developed to quality standards on time and within budget. However, specific characteristics of geographical information systems, in terms of their inherent need for graphical output, render some process management tools and techniques less appropriate. This paper examines process management activities that are applicable to GIS, and suggests that it may be possible to extend such developments into the visual programming domain. A case study concerned with development effort estimation is presented as a precursor to a discussion of the implications of system requirements for significant graphical output.

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  • GIS maturity and integration

    Marr, Andrew; Benwell, George L (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Part of the GeoComputation '96 Special Issue 96/25; follow the "related link" to download the entire collection as a single document.

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  • Experimental transformation of a cognitive schema into a display structure

    Wong, B L William; O’Hare, David; Sallis, Philip (1996-06)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that this is a searchable PDF derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source document. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.

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  • Spatial databases—creative future concepts and use

    Benwell, George L (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Part of the GeoComputation '96 Special Issue 96/25; follow the "related link" to download the entire collection as a single document.

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  • A goal-oriented approach for designing decision support displays in dynamic environments

    Wong, B L William; O’Hare, David; Sallis, Philip (1996-09)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This paper reports on how the Critical Decision Method, a cognitive task analysis technique, was employed to identify the goal states of tasks performed by dispatchers in a dynamic environment, the Sydney Ambulance Co-ordination Centre. The analysis identified five goal states: Notification; Situation awareness; Planning resource to task compatibility; Speedy response; Maintain history of developments. These goals were then used to guide the development of display concepts that support decision strategies invoked by dispatchers in this task environment.

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  • Connectionist-based information systems: a proposed research theme

    Kasabov, Nikola; Purvis, Martin; Sallis, Philip (1996-02)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This PDF was created from a converted WordPerfect document. While all reasonable efforts have been made to reproduce the original paper as closely as possible, some formatting in the PDF may vary from the original hard-copy paper.

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  • Interactive visualisation tools for analysing NIR data

    Munro, Hayden; Novins, Kevin; Benwell, George L; Moffat, Alistair (1996-07)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that this is a searchable PDF derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source document. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.

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  • First experiences in implementing a spatial metadata repository

    Cockcroft, Sophie (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Part of the GeoComputation '96 Special Issue 96/25; follow the "related link" to download the entire collection as a single document.

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  • Software process engineering for measurement-driven software quality programs—realism and idealism

    MacDonell, Stephen; Gray, Andrew (1996-09)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This paper brings together a set of commonsense recommendations relating to the delivery of software quality, with some emphasis on the adoption of realistic perspectives for software process/product stakeholders in the area of process improvement. The use of software measurement is regarded as an essential component for a quality development program, in terms of prediction, control, and adaptation as well as the communication necessary for stakeholders’ realistic perspectives. Some recipes for failure are briefly considered so as to enable some degree of contrast between what is currently perceived to be good and bad practices. This is followed by an evaluation of the quality-at-all-costs model, including a brief pragmatic investigation of quality in other, more mature, disciplines. Several programs that claim to assist in the pursuit of quality are examined, with some suggestions made as to how they may best be used in practice.

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  • Using data models to estimate required effort in creating a spatial information system

    Benwell, George L; MacDonell, Stephen (1996-01)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The creation of spatial information systems can be viewed from many directions. One such view is to see the creation in terms of data collection, data modelling, codifying spatial processes, information management, analysis and presentation. The amount of effort to create such systems is frequently under-estimated; this is true for each aspect of the above view. The accuracy of the assessment of effort will vary for each aspect. This paper concentrates on the effort required to create the code for spatial processes and analysis. Recent experience has indicated that this is an area where considerable under-estimation is occurring. Function point analysis presented in this paper provides a reliable metric for spatial systems developers to assess required effort based on spatial data models.

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