1,740 results for Working or discussion paper

  • When does it matter how you ask? Cross-subject heterogeneity in framing effects in a charitable donation experiment

    Fielding, David; Knowles, Stephen; Robertson, Kirsten (2017-01)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    In this paper we present results from an experiment that draws on insights from economics on different possible incentives for generosity and insights from social psychology on different possible personality types. Firstly, we test whether the effect of an appeal to a pure altruism motive versus an appeal to a self-interest motive varies across subjects. We find that there is substantial variation, and this variation is strongly correlated with a subject’s level of materialism. Secondly, we test whether spoken appeals and written appeals have different effects. We find no evidence for such a difference. These results have important implications for the fundraising strategies of charities and for experimental design.

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  • Health Shocks and Child Time Allocation Decisions by Households: Evidence from Ethiopia

    Dinku, Yonatan; Fielding, David; Genc, Murat (2017-04)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Little is currently known about the effects of shocks to parental health on the allocation of children’s time between alternative activities. Using longitudinal data from the Ethiopian Young Lives surveys of 2006 and 2009, we analyze the effect of health shocks on the amount of children’s time spent in work, leisure and education. We find that paternal illness increases the time spent in income-generating work but maternal illness increases the time spent in domestic work. Moreover, maternal illness has a relatively large effect on daughters while paternal illness has a relatively large effect on sons. Overall, parental illness leads to large and significant increases in the amount of child labour as defined by UNICEF.

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  • The impact of climate change on crop production in Ghana: A Structural Ricardian analysis

    Etwire, Prince M.; Fielding, David; Kahui, Victoria (2017-04)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    We apply a Structural Ricardian Model (SRM) to farm-level data from Ghana in order to estimate the impact of climate change on crop production. The SRM explicitly incorporates changes in farmers’ crop selection in response to variation in climate, a feature lacking in many existing models of climate change response in Africa. Two other novel features of our model are an estimate of the response of agricultural profits to differences in land tenure, and a comprehensive investigation of the appropriate functional form with which to model farmers’ responses. This final feature turns out to be important, since estimates of the effect of climate change turn out to be sensitive to the choice of functional form.

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  • Access to Financing and Firm Growth: Evidence from Ethiopia

    Regasa, Dereje; Fielding, David; Roberts, Helen (2017-04)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Using Ethiopian firm-level data, we model the effect of different types of financing on firm growth. The form of financing is potentially endogenous to firm growth, and one contribution of this paper is to introduce a new instrumental variable which captures local variation in financial depth. Unlike previous studies of firms in low-income countries, we find evidence for a negative relationship between the use of external finance and firm growth, which suggests that there are substantial cross-country differences in the finance-growth nexus. We discuss possible explanations for this phenomenon and its implications for development policy.

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  • Gone with the Wind: International Migration

    Aburn, Amelia; Wesselbaum, Dennis (2017-04)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This paper adds to the literature on the determinants of international migration. First, we offer a joint analysis of the driving forces of migration capturing year-to-year variations and long-run effects. Second, we analyze the dynamic response of migration to shocks to its determinants. We start by presenting a theoretical model that allows us to model migration as an augmented gravity equation. We then construct a rich panel data set with 16 destination and 198 origin countries between 1980 and 2014. Most importantly, we find that climate change is a more important driver than income and political freedom together. Our results imply that a large time dimension is key to understand the effects of climate change. We then estimate a panel vectorautoregressive model showing that the dynamic response of migration is very different across shocks to different driving forces. Our findings carry implications for national and international immigration policies.

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  • Does institutional quality resolve the Lucas Paradox?

    Akhtaruzzaman, Muhammad; Hajzler, Christopher; Owen, P. Dorian (2016-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The Lucas Paradox observes that capital flows predominantly to relatively rich countries, contradicting the neoclassical prediction that it should flow to poorer capital-scarce countries. Alfaro, Kalemli-Ozcan, and Volosovych (2008) (AKV) argue that cross-country variation in institutional quality can fully explain the Paradox, contending that if institutional quality is included in regression models explaining international capital inflows, a country’s level of economic development is no longer statistically significant. We replicate AKV’s results using their cross-sectional IFS capital flow data. Motivated by the importance of conducting inference in statistically adequate models, we focus on misspecification testing of alternative functional forms of their empirical model of capital flows. We show that their resolution of the Paradox relies on inference in a misspecified model. In models that do not fail basic misspecification tests, even though institutional quality is a significant determinant of capital inflows, a country’s level of economic development also remains a significant predictor. The same conclusions are reached using an extended dataset covering more recent IFS international capital flow data, first-differenced capital stock data and additional controls.

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  • John Evelyn (1620-1706) An Inventory of Works, Special Collections, University of Otago

    Smith, Romilly (2016)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    John Evelyn was born in Wotton, Surrey in October 1620. He lived in tumultuous times – the execution of Charles I, the ascension of Oliver Cromwell and the Interregnum, and the Restoration of King Charles II, of whose Court Evelyn was a member. A friend and contemporary of diarist Samuel Pepys, Evelyn kept his own diary from 1641 until just before his death; it was first published in 1818. Evelyn was a founding member of the Royal Society; and published over 30 works in his lifetime, most notably his treatise on trees and forestry, Sylva; a work that went through multiple editions. Dunedin-born Esmond de Beer (1895-1990) was an eminent scholar of John Evelyn and wrote the definitive edition of Evelyn’s Diary (1955). De Beer lived most of his adult life in London but donated many of his books to the University of Otago and it is him we must thank for most of the Evelyn titles in Special Collections. The books in this inventory will be listed in chronological order of date of printing, not necessarily of first publication (please refer to Keynes’s Bibliography for this list.) Multiple edition copies of the same title will be listed together. For the purposes of this inventory, page numbers from Geoffrey Keynes’s John Evelyn: A Study in Bibliophily with a Bibliography of his Writings, 2nd edition (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1968), will be given.

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  • The Center Matters for the Periphery: On the Predictive Ability of a GZ-Type Spread for Economic Activity

    Guender, A.V.; Tolan, B. (2013)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Sailing for Survival

    Mennis, Mary R. (2014)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Sailing for Survival is a comparative study of the trading systems and canoes of two groups of people in Papua New Guinea: the Bel people of Bilbil/Yabob on the North Coast, near Madang and the Motu people on the South Coast, near Port Moresby. There is now no doubt that they shared a common ancestry in West New Britain. They both belong to Austronesian language groups but had no contact with each other on their trade routes, separated as they were by twisting coastlines and rugged mountain ranges, nor did any trade items [apart from obsidian] pass from one trading zone to the other for over two thousand years. Yet the trade systems they developed independently have an amazing array of commonality harking back to their common ancestry in the Bismarck Archipelago. The association between archaeological and linguistic distributions suggests that the movement of Papuan Tip Cluster speakers to the west along the Papuan Coast took place about 2800 years ago, and the time depth for the spread out of the Bismarcks area of North New Guinea cluster languages may be within the last 1500 years. The members of each group, the Bel and the Motu evolved their own system of survival through trading pots on long trading voyages which became a focal point of their culture, beliefs and ritual. In their response to their environmental conditions and, influenced by introduced technological features, they developed quite different trading vessels: the lagatoi of the Motu people and the lalong and balangut of the Madang people. One of the aims of this report is to relate the construction of each of these vessels and compare and contrast them with the conclusion that form follows function. Many of the characteristics of the two trading systems the dadeng/waing of the Madang area and the hiri of the Motu are comparable: the need to trade because of infertile soil; the clay pots that the women made; the position of the women in the trading system; the mythology and origin myths of the trading system; the belief in magic to protect the traders and enhance the weather; the use of geographic points; the winds; and the stars to aid navigation. Their similar ancestral origins and culture was adapted to the environmental conditions in which the people found themselves. Although there were cultural and social reasons for the trading trips, the primary reason was economic - the men were Sailing for Survival.

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  • Admirality Islands

    Nevermann, Hans (2013)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Translated by John Dennison

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  • Text categorization and similarity analysis: implementation and evaluation

    Fowke, Michael; Hinze, Annika; Heese, Ralf (2013-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    This report covers the implementation of software that aims to identify document versions and se-mantically related documents. This is important due to the increasing amount of digital information. Key criteria were that the software was fast and required limited disk space. Previous research de-termined that the Simhash algorithm was the most appropriate for this application so this method was implemented. The structure of each component was well defined with the inputs and outputs constant and the result was a software system that can have interchangeable parts if required.

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  • Social interactions using an electronic rabbit

    Zaicu, Alexandru Calin; Hinze, Annika (2013-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    In this project we use an electronic rabbit called Karotz, created by French company Violet. The rabbits have the ability to connect autonomously to a WI-FI network. IN this project we use Karotz to record an audio log that will contain sounds of the environment. We also programmed a way for the rabbit to send audio to its other Karotz friend. We explored if Karotz can be used to help people stay in contact with each other and to feel less homesick.

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  • Text categorization and similarity analysis: similarity measure, architecture and design

    Fowke, Michael; Hinze, Annika; Heese, Ralf (2013-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    This research looks at the most appropriate similarity measure to use for a document classification problem. The goal is to find a method that is accurate in finding both semantically and version related documents. A necessary requirement is that the method is efficient in its speed and disk usage. Simhash is found to be the measure best suited to the application and it can be combined with other software to increase the accuracy. Pingar have provided an API that will extract the entities from a document and create a taxonomy displaying the relationships and this extra information can be used to accurately classify input documents. Two algorithms are designed incorporating the Pingar API and then finally an efficient comparison algorithm is introduced to cut down the comparisons required.

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  • Text categorization and similarity analysis: similarity measure, literature review

    Fowke, Michael; Hinze, Annika; Heese, Ralf (2013-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    Document classification and provenance has become an important area of computer science as the amount of digital information is growing significantly. Organisations are storing documents on computers rather than in paper form. Software is now required that will show the similarities between documents (i.e. document classification) and to point out duplicates and possibly the history of each document (i.e. provenance). Poor organisation is common and leads to situations like above. There exists a number of software solutions in this area designed to make document organisation as simple as possible. I'm doing my project with Pingar who are a company based in Auckland who aim to help organise the growing amount of unstructured digital data. This reports analyses the existing literature in this area with the aim to determine what already exists and how my project will be different from existing solutions.

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  • Catching and displaying memory cues for a mobile augmented memory system

    Bellamy, Jake; Hinze, Annika (2013-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    This report goes over and details the progress of the 2013 COMP477 project “Augmenting Memory: The Digital Parrot on Mobile Devices” undertaken by Jake Bellamy and supervised by Annika Hinze at the University of Waikato. The report begins with an overview on the problem with remembering events in people’s lives and details the background information on the Digital Parrot system. It also describes the previous project that preceded this one, which began to conceptualize the Digital Parrot on mobile devices. It analyses problems with the current design of the system and addresses them. The report then goes on to conduct an in depth user study with the functioning version of the software. The user study finds design flaws and incorrect functionality in the application that would not have otherwise been apparent. Finally, the report concludes with a proposed user interface concept that addresses all of the issues found in the user study and describes how the system would work. It describes the initial implementation that has begun in building this system.

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  • Bilateral foreign aid: How important is aid effectiveness to people for choosing countries to support?

    Cunningham, Harry; Knowles, Stephen; Hansen, Paul (2016-04)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    We conduct a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to determine how important aid effectiveness is to people relative to other criteria for choosing countries to support with bilateral foreign aid. We find that aid effectiveness is important, on a par with recipient-country need as proxied by the level of hunger and malnutrition. Both criteria are more important than others.

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  • Eric Gill (1882-1940): An Inventory of his Work in Special Collections, University of Otago

    Smith, Romilly (2016-04)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Eric Gill (1882-1940) was an artist, engraver, typographer and sculptor. The works he completed in his lifetime have had a lasting effect and influence on the artistic world. Special Collections at the University of Otago has a number of works by Eric Gill and by others about Eric Gill. This inventory lists those and other relevant works.

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  • Robert Gibbings (1889-1958): An Inventory of his Work in Special Collections, University of Otago

    Smith, Romilly (2016-04)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Irish-born Robert Gibbings (1889-1958) was an incredibly talented artist, engraver, and author. He traveled widely and spent a lot of time in the South Pacific; he even visited Dunedin in the 1940s. Special Collections at the University of Otago has a wide range of works by and about Gibbings; most of which are listed in this inventory.

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  • The Empress Augusta/Sepik River

    Reche, Otto (2015)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

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  • Credit constraints and impact on farm household welfare: evidence from Vietnam's north central coast region

    Tran, M. C.; Gan, Christopher; Hu, Baiding

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    This study aims at identifying factors affecting formal credit constraint status of rural farm households in Vietnam’s North Central Coast region (NCC). Using the Direct Elicitation method (DEM), we consider both internal and external credit rationing. Empirical evidences confirm the importance of household head’s age, gender and education to household’s likelihood of being credit constrained. In addition, households who have advantages of farm land size, labour resources and non‐farm income are less likely to be credit constrained. Poor households are observed to remain restricted by formal credit institutions. Results from the endogenous switching regression model suggest that credit constraints have negative impact on household’s consumption per capita and informal credit can act as a substitute to mitigate the influence of formal credit constraints.

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