41 results for 1920

  • Calendar 1920

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1920)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1928

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1928)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1929

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1929)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1925

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1925)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1923

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1923)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1926

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1926)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1924

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1924)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1921

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1921)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1922

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1922)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1927

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1927)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • The psychology of laughter and the comic

    Beeby, Clarence Edward (1923)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Laughter may for the present, be defined as a movement of some or all of the muscles of the face, especially those of the lips accompanied by deep inspirations and interrupted expiration of air from the lungs producing intermittent vocal sounds of varying character.

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  • A comparison between the immigration into New Zealand by the New Zealand Company and that undertaken by the Canterbury Provincial Government

    Day, Inez Waiata (1927)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    No consecutive account of the Immigration into New Zealand and the policy regulating it has yet been attempted; and though the subject has been treated of in more than a cursory manner by the numerous writers who have dealt with the systematic colonisation of New Zealand and to whose works I am greatly indebted) yet in regard to later years the subject has received scant attention. It is by no means unimportant or uninteresting to trace the fluctuations in the policy our early provincial legislators followed in the matter of introducing immigrants, and to compare the results they obtained with those of their predecessors in this undertaking, whether Home Government or private company.

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  • The geology of the Malvern Hills, with map and sections, panoramic sketches, and photographs.

    Speight, R; Page, S (1928)


    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The history of the first New Zealand Parliament : being an account of the two houses of the Legislature, 1854-5

    Pierre, Bill (1923)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The solution of mercuric sulphide in hydrgen iodide and the solubility of mercuric iodide in solutions of potassium iodide

    Dixon, J. K. (1927)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    In group II A. Analysis two methods are used to dissolve precipitated Mercury Sulphide – potassium chlorate and concentrated hydrochloric acid or aqua regia. These methods are essentially the solution of mercury sulphide by means of nascent chlorine. A third method has been described whereby mercury sulphide is dissolved in a sulphuric acid solution of potassium iodide. This mixture liberates hydrogen iodide which is the dissolving agent. From the equations [complicated equations here] is seems possible that the dissolving action is due to complex formation. It will be seen from equation (1) that the lower the concentration of the sulphideions the greater will be tendency for mercury sulphide to dissolve. This furnishes an explanation why potassium iodide alone cannot be used with same success as hydrogen iodide. With potassium iodide potassium sulphide instead of hydrogen sulphide will be formed during the solution reaction. As potassium sulphide is the salt of a strong base there will remain in solution a high concentration of sulphideions which must promote the back reaction shown in equation (1) and an equilibrium is all that can be attained. It is not possible to reduce the sulphide ion concentration by boiling as it is with hydrogen sulphide since potassium sulphide is non volatile. If the ordinary methods and this new method are compared it is seen that whereas nascent chlorine converts mercury sulphide into mercury chloride, the action of hydrogen iodide is to form a complex salt which has a very low concentration of mercury ions. It is possible therefore that this new method may not give so sensitive a test for mercury. The object of this portion of the work is to ascertain the possibility of testing for mercury in Group II analysis by using the hydrogen iodide method of dissolving the precipitated mercury sulphide and to compare the sensitivity of the test with that of the methods usually employed.

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  • Research on the electrometric determination of the hydrolysis of salts by means of the hydrogen electrode and of the quin-hydrone electrode, with special reference to the anomalous behaviour of solutions of zinc sulphate

    Marris, N. A. (1927)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Many methods have been described for the determination of the degree of hydrolysis of salts. The following may be given as examples of the more important of these:- (I) Measurement of the rate of inversion of sugar. (II) Measurement of the rate of Saponification of Ethyl, or Methyl Acetate (III) Determination of Electrical Conductivity (IV) Electrometric determination of Hydrogen ion concentration by Hydrogen Electrode (V) Determination of Freezing Point (VI) Distillation of Solutions (VII) Dilatometric considerations (VIII) Solubility of Carbonates in water in atmosphere of Carbon Dioxide (IX) Partition of base between two immiscible solvents (X) Measurement of Heats of Neutralisation (XI) Measurement of the Motion Ions (XII) Decomposition of diazoacetic aster by hydrogen ions.

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  • The history of Lawrence, Otago, New Zealand, from earliest times to 1921, including a review of its future prospects

    Jennings, M. A. (1921)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    In order to enable the reader to see in his mind's eye the history of Lawrence unfolding itself before him, he must first become acquainted with the history of the district in which the future town is to arise. As the history of the district is an organic part of that of the province in which it is situated, it will be necessary to sketch in outline the history of the province and to describe the various conditions that prevailed as well as the events that took place in so far as they influenced and affected the development of the interior. Otago is now the southernmost province of the South Island of New Zealand. The Otago land district lies between the forty-fourth and the forty-seventh parallels of South latitude, and extends from one hundred and sixty seven degrees twenty one minutes to one hundred and seventy one degrees ten minutes of East longitude. Its capital, Dunedin, has been built at the head of Otago Harbour and is only 12 miles distant by mail from Port Chalmers, which is accessible to large sea-going vessels. For the purposes of local government the province is divided into counties and the counties into ridings. Lawrence is in Tuapeka County, which occupies a south easterly portion of the province and is hounded on the north by the Vincent and Maniototo Counties; on the east by that of the Taieri; on the south by those of Bruce and Clutha, and on the west by that of Southland. Its area is one thousand three hundred and sixty five square miles. No portion of the Tuapeka County touches the coast. Although Lawrence is frequently spoken of as being in Central Otago, the statement is not exactly true as the town is only sixty miles south east from Dunedin by rail and distant from the sea coast “as the crow flies” about thirty miles, whereas the width of the province from east to west is from one hundred and sixty to two hundred miles. The County is drained by the Tuapeka and Waitahuna rivers, both of which flow from the north east to south west into the Molyneux River; by the Waipori in the north and the Tokomairiro on the south eastern side. On the northerly fringe of the Tuapeka district are the Lammerly Moutains of an average altitude of three thousand feet. The general slope of the country is from the north east to the southwest and is more of nature of gently undulating downs than of hilly country. Looking to the south and southeast from Lawrence an extremely steep slope is noticeable. This is known as the Waitahuna Heights and rises rapidly to about one thousand feet. The climate is intermediate between the damp and cloudy coastal climate and the dry and sunny, but frosty climate of Central Otago proper. Further geographical features will be described as the course of historical events renders a reference to them necessary.

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  • The history of the early gold discoveries in the Province of Otago, 1851-1863.

    Jefcoate, Harold Oliver (1922)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Bibliography missing.

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  • New Zealand State advances office

    Johnston, John George (1927)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 77 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript.

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  • The Southland province of New Zealand in the days of Dr. J.A.R. Menzies (Superintendent, 1861-1864).

    Dreaver, A. R. (1929)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    59 leaves, [25] leaves of plates :ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 25 cm.

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