89 results for 1930

  • Calendar 1932

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1932)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1933

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1933)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1937

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1937)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1938

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1938)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1935

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1935)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1939

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1939)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1930

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1930)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1934

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1934)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1936

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1936)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1931

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1931)

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    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • A history of the political labour movement in New Zealand, 1850-1913

    Robinson, K.W. (1937)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    A typically modern trend in democratic countries has been the entry of labour representatives into the political arena. New Zealand has proved no exception to the rule, but the history of her own labour movement, particularly in its earlier years, is still rather disconnected in the eyes of the general public. This thesis therefore attempts to recount the origins of that movement with the object of presenting a clearer idea of the nature of the beginnings of the party which constitutes the present government. It was at first intended to write of the Labour Party in later years, but preliminary investigation was sufficient to show that no such treatment could be adequate without a knowledge of the origins of the Party. Further investigation showed those origins to be worthy of separate study in themselves, and the history of the Labour Party is therefore left for other pens to write. The aim throughout has been to trace, not a party, but a movement, and to discover how much that movement was influenced by contemporary events and how much it was a natural and inevitable development. A thorough study of the subject, giving an exhaustive survey of opinions and incidents, individuals and groups in every centre of population, would have required intensive and prolonged research which the writer was not in a position to carry out. The extra work would doubtless have made the history more comprehensive, but it is certain that the general conclusions arrived at would not have been modified seriously. Newspapers are generally regarded as an unreliable source of evidence, but in this case exception can perhaps be claimed for making extensive use of one paper, since it gave expression to working-class opinions without displaying the fanaticism of purely labour publications. Thanks are due to the Central Office of the Labour Party in Wellington for the courtesy of the officials in placing material at my disposal. It is unfortunate that some of this material, which may have been of considerable value, went astray in the post, and was not traced. Thanks must also be expressed to the Hon. John Rigg, who was helpful in supplying newspaper cuttings and reminiscences dealing with the Political Labour League, and to Mr. E.J. Howard, M.P. for valuable advice. In some cases likely people who were approached, while showing keen interest, seemed unable to rely on their memories for anything definite; one supplied suggestions which were of no use; another, from whom much was expected, did not reply at all. During the whole period of research what impressed one most was the dearth of published material on the subject and the scant attention paid to the movement in general in comprehensive works. This made the task of constructing general outlines as a basis for work very difficult. The investigation has suggested that the early organised labour parties in New Zealand were striving not so much for something they did not possess as to maintain certain privileges which they felt were slipping from their grasp. Their aim appears to have been not so much an emancipation from the present as a safeguard for the future. This, at least, is apparent to the mind of the writer, and it is hoped that his efforts may be of some use in clearing the mist which shrouds the infancy of labour in this country.

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  • The history of the first and second sessions of the fourth New Zealand parliament, 1866-1867.

    Gallagher, Halsey Alexander William (1938)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • An account of the systematics, anatomy and bionomics of Austroperla Cyrene Newman.

    Margaret Sutcliffe, Thomson (1934)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The black stonefly Austroperla cyrene Newman (P11) is the most abundant insect of its order in New Zealand. A study of its anatomy and bionomics is of interest, firstly because of the primitive nature of the insect itself, and secondly in its relationship to the fauna of mountain streams, which is again correlated with the question of trout food.

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  • An investigation of the methods for the preparation of methyl chloroform and an attempted condensation of methyl chloroform with malonic ester

    Adams, A. F. R. (1936)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Since the reports of the methyl chloroform or 1.1.1 trichlorethane given by various early workers, the methods of preparation have received very little attention. The early reports are summarized in “Beilstein’s Handbuch der Organischen Chemie,” 4th edition. Vol. 1 p. 85. By the action of chlorine on ethylidene dichloride, methyl chloroform and other products are obtained (Regnault, Ann. 1840. 33. 317) and Stadel. 1879. 195. 184). The chlorination, in light, of ethylidene dichloride (1.1 dichlorethane) gives a mixture of 1.1.1. and 1.1.2. trichlorethanes (A. 1978. 368) p. 84. The chlorination of ethylidene dichloride in light is more difficult than the chlorination of ethylene dichloride, and gives as first products both 1.1.1. trichlorethane and 1.1.2. trichlorethane (D’Ans. Kautzch. J. Pr. Chem. 1909 (2). 80. 312; A, 1909 (1). 754).

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  • An investigation of the heterogeneous equilibria involved in the systems (a) potassium chloride - mercuric chloride -acetone at 25 degrees C; (b)potassium chloride - mercuric chloride - ethyl alcohol at 25 degrees C; (c) mercuric chloride - acetone - water at 25 degrees C and 35 degrees C

    Wilkins, G. J. (1937)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    It has long been realised that the mercuric halides, as salts, possessed remarkable properties. They are readily soluble in non-ionising solvents, have low melting points, and their solutions even in hydroxylic solvents are but feebly ionised. These peculiarities have more recently been attributed to the extreme difficulty with which the two valence electrons are lost by a mercury atom to form an ion.

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  • Some deliquent boys at school : a study of the school progress and behaviour of a group of boys brought to official notice of on charges of deliquency.

    Mullan, Molly Isobel (1937)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The organised activities of Christchurch children outside the school.

    Hart, Edith Muriel (1936)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The geology of the Kakahu district, South Canterbury, New Zealand

    Maling, P. B. (1933)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The Kakahu district is situated in South Canterbury, some ten miles west of the township of Geraldine. The area here dealt with is bounded to the south and west by the Opihi and Opuha rivers respectively; while to the north it is bounded by a spur of the Four Peaks’ range stretching northwest from Waitohi Hill. To the east the area extends as far as Hilton, where the uppermost tertiary bds dip beneath the gravels of the South Canterbury plains. The Kakahu river is a tributary of the Hae-HaeTe Moana which rises on the Four Peaks’ range and flows in a south-easterly direction, joining the Opihi river shortly before the latter reaches the sea. The area dealt with covers practically the whole of the watershed of the Kakahu river. The district is readily accessible, being reached by good roads from Geraldine, Temuka, Pleasant Point, Raincliff and Fairlie.

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  • Studies in catalytic hydrogenation: the system HCN + 2H2=CH3NH2

    Barrer, R. M. (1931)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Chemistry owes much to the catalytic forces which effect otherwise difficulty accomplished reactions. To catalysis Organic Chemistry owes the Grignard reagents, which have been employed not only for a multitude of simpler syntheses but also for the more complex syntheses of carbohydrates (Paal. Ber, 1905, 38 1656; 1906,39,1301,2823, 2827) Frankland and Twiss J.C.S. 1905, 87, 864), of terpenss (Perkin J.C.S. 1907, 91, 480, Hesse Ber. 1909, 42, 1127, Mills and Bain J.C.S. 1910, 97, 1866) and of organo-silicon compounds (Kipping J.C.S. 1901 to 1909). Pope and Peachy effected resolutions of tin compounds with its aid. Chlorination is effected catalytically by suitable carriers. The Friedel and Crafte reaction is effected also by suitable halides. Numerous condensations such as the Benzoin condensation, the Aldol condensation, the Claisen condensation, and also esterification are catalytically effected. Equilibria between dynamic isomerides, in racemisation, and in mutarotation, are promoted by catalysis. Technical chemistry has, through catalysis, reversed the economic standing of nations. Cases in point are the synthesis of indigo, a stage in which is the catalytic oxidation of Napthalene by Sulphuric acid and Mercury, and the manufacture of sulphuric acids, of Ammonia and of Nitrates. The manufacture of synthetic petrols, power alcohols, and the new utilisations of coal depend entirely upon catalysts for their successful functioning. Analytical chemistry employs catalysts in processes of gas absorption such as addition of Uranyl Sulphate to Sulphuric Acid in the absorption of Ethylene (Lebeau and Damiens Compt. Rand. 1913, 156, 557) or of Corrosive Sublimate to alhaline Pyrogallol to accelerate the absorption of Oxygen. (Stassana, Compt. Rend. Soc. Biol. 1905, 58, 96). Also in Oxidation, such as the permanganate titration of iron in the presence of Hydrochloric and of Manganese Salts (Kessler. Pogg. Am. 1863, 118, 48; 119, 225), or the ability of Ferrous Sulphate to promote interaction between Potassium Persilphate and Potassium Iodide (Price Z Phys. Chem. 1898, 27, 474); and Reduction as in the employment of a Zinc-Copper Couple for the reduction of Chlorates to Chlorates (Thorpe and Eccles J.C.S. 1873, 26, 541; Bothamley and Thompson Ibid 1888, 53, 164). Catalysts are also employed in Organic analysis, as for example the use of colloidal platinum metals to convert Halogen compounds into Hydrogenated products and Halogen acid in the presence of Hydrogen (Borshe and Heimburger, Ber. 1915, 48, 452, 850). In Inorganic Chemistry a large number of reactions are catalytically accelerated. One of the best known is the decomposition of Potassium Chlorate in the Presence of Manganese Dioxide. Numerous catalyses are cited in the work of Dhar. (Ann. Chim. 11, 130-223, 1919). Hydrogen peroxide, another example of classical importance in chemical kinetics is decomposed by numerous agents, such as glass wool, salts of heavy metals, colloidal platinum. In Electrochemistry one may cite such examples as the addition of Fluorides in the preparation of Persulphates or percarbonates, (Muller and Friedberger, Z. Elektrochem., 1902, 8, 230), or the use of Lead Peroxide anodes in the oxidation of Chromates to Dichromates (Z. Elektrochem, 1905, 11, 863). Para-nitrotoluene with platinum anodes yields p-nitro-benzoic acid almost quantitatively. An enormous number of reactions is accelerated by radiant energy, according to photo chemical laws. A typical example is the union of Hydrogen and Chlorine, whose mechanism has occupied the attention of numerous workers. The photocatalytic combination of carbon-monoxide and Chlorine, of Sulphur Dioxide and Chlorine, of saturated, unsaturated, and aromatic hydro-carbons, and of acids (much as Acetic acid) and Chlorine furnish still further examples. Such reactions are further sensitive to the presence of ordinary material catalysts or anti-catalysts (See Griffiths and McKeowan, (“Photochemistry” p. 626.)

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  • A study of the binary system, aniline-o-chlorophenol

    Ellyett, C. D. (1936)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    When two organic liquids are missed the resulting physical properties of the solution nearly always differ from those calculated on the assumption of an additive relationship. The extent of these deviations varies widely with the nature of the liquids chosen, and where there is a large evolution of heat it is considered that molecular compound formation has occurred. Some binary mixtures of phenols with aromatic bases have been investigated by Bramley (1) and are of this type. Macleod (2) has derived an expression for the viscosity of a binary mixture which has undergone volume change and compound formation. The expression contains the factor Ma/Mc, where Mc is the calculated mean molecular weight of the constituents and Ma is the actual mean molecular weight after mixing. By using Bramley’s density and viscosity results Macleod has evaluated Ma/Mc for the binary system aniline – o-chlorophenol. Bramley has determined the freezing-poing curve for this system, showing the existence of an equimolecular compound, and so Macleod has been able to calculate the number of double molecules required to give the ratio Ma/Mc. He has also calculated the equilibrium constants for a number of temperatures; using the amount of compound formation found from the viscosity formula at the equimolecular percentage and assuming the law of mass action to hold. The object of this work is a determination of the heats of reaction of this mixture at several temperatures, enabling the equilibrium constants to be calculated directly. The comparison of these constants with those obtained by Macleod from viscosity data should afford a check on his equation for the viscosity of binary mixtures. The formula for the calculation of the heat of reaction from the temperature rise necessitated knowledge of the specific heat of the mixture. It was therefore necessary to determine the specific heat curves at definite temperatures. These results, besides being necessary for the heats of reaction, also enables the partial molal heat capacities to be calculated. Further, so investigation of the literature shows that there are at present several different theories as to the nature of the link in this of compound. As the various theories depend partly upon the refractive index, it was decided to measure this property for the mixture. This work, together with refractive index measurements in hydrated mixtures, forms the second part of the thesis.

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