11 results for 1940, Masters, 1947

  • The synthesis of 2:3:4-trimethyl sacchardiamide

    Vivian, G. W. (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    As constituents of polyuronides, uronic acids have a frequent and wide occurrence in nature. Much of the carbohydrate material in plants, which includes all pectic materials and plant gums, many plant mucilages, hemicelluloses and gel-forming substances and some microbial polysaccharides, belong to the group. Uronic acid residues have been shown to exist in the animal body where they may be linked wither to complex polysaccharides or to proteins. The uronic acids are reducing sugar acids formed by the oxidation of the terminal carbinol group (C atom 6) of the sugar, a process which apparently occurs readily in both plants and animals. Although a large number of uronic acids are theoretically possible, only three have been found to occur naturally, these being d-galacturonic, d-glucuronic and d-mannuronic acids.

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  • An apparatus for the purification of radon

    Sutton, H. C. (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    As is well known, radium has been used for many years as a source of gamma radiation for therapeutic use. The method consists in placing needles of radium in suitable positions on and around the cancerous growth; dosage being controlled by the radium content of each needle, and its time of application. Such operations are extremely dangerous, in that the needles are small and easily lost; yet the radium decays very slowly so that the intensity of radiation emitted by the needles remains almost constant. The high cost of such needles also limits their use. An alternative method of gamma ray therapy utilises needles of radon, the radioactive gas which is the first decay product of radium. Radon has a half life period of 3.825 days, compared with that of radium, of 1580 years. Consequently its activity is appreciable only over its first few days, having fallen to one per cent of its initial value in 25 days. The danger factor is thereby largely eliminated, since lost radon needles would be quite safe, even if still inside that patient, after a month or so. Moreover, the dosage can be arranged so that the needles are left permanently in the patient, the dose integrating to the required amount in infinite time. In some cases, where the tumour is rather inaccessible, this method is very convenient. A further advantage of radon lies in the fact that it is a gas, and can therefore be compressed to small sources of any required shape or size. Thus the radium from which it is prepared is rendered many times more useful, all types of needle being available from a common source. This extends its use to many cases not otherwise capable of treatment, as it will be appreciated that the cost of a complete stock of all types of radium needles is prohibitive. The more so, so many of them would remain out of use for years.

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  • The methylation of benzoylated glucose mercaptals

    Wilkinson, I. A. (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The central compound of the carbohydrates is glucose and it is around this substance that the chemistry of the carbohydrates and their molecular structure has been developed. The empirical formula was early established as CH2O and on the development of the Beckmann Apparatus the true formula was shown to be C₆H₁₂O₆ by Tollens and Mayer. Meanwhile, Killani (1886) had demonstrated the presence of an aldehyde group by forming the cyanhydrin, which on hydrolysis and reduction gave n-heptoic acid. The formation of this acid also indicated that the six carbons were arranged in a straight chain. The next major development was the introduction by Fischer of the “Fischer Projection Formula”. This structure with four asymmetric carbon atoms and hence allowing for 24 or 16 optical isomers (Vant Hoff – Le Bel Theory,) accounted for the numerous optical isomers of glucose that were being reported at the time, e.g. galactose by Pasteur as early as 1856.

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  • An apparatus for the purification of radon

    Sutton, H. C. (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    As is well known, radium has been used for many years as a source of gamma radiation for therapeutic use. The method consists in placing needles of radium in suitable positions on and around the cancerous growth; dosage being controlled by the radium content of each needle, and its time of application. Such operations are extremely dangerous, in that the needles are small and easily lost; yet the radium decays very slowly so that the intensity of radiation emitted by the needles remains almost constant. The high cost of such needles also limits their use. An alternative method of gamma ray therapy utilises needles of radon, the radioactive gas which is the first decay product of radium. Radon has a half life period of 3.825 days, compared with that of radium, of 1580 years. Consequently its activity is appreciable only over its first few days, having fallen to one per cent of its initial value in 25 days. The danger factor is thereby largely eliminated, since lost radon needles would be quite safe, even if still inside that patient, after a month or so. Moreover, the dosage can be arranged so that the needles are left permanently in the patient, the dose integrating to the required amount in infinite time. In some cases, where the tumour is rather inaccessible, this method is very convenient. A further advantage of radon lies in the fact that it is a gas, and can therefore be compressed to small sources of any required shape or size. Thus the radium from which it is prepared is rendered many times more useful, all types of needle being available from a common source. This extends its use to many cases not otherwise capable of treatment, as it will be appreciated that the cost of a complete stock of all types of radium needles is prohibitive. The more so, so many of them would remain out of use for years.

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  • The synthesis off 2: 3: 4-trimethyl sacchardiamide

    Vivian, G. W. (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    As constituents of polyuronides, uronic acids have a frequent and wide occurrence in nature. Much of the carbohydrate material in plants, which includes all pectic materials and plant gums, many plant mucilages, hemicelluloses and gel-forming substances and some microbial polysaccharides, belong to the group. Uronic acid residues have been shown to exist in the animal body where they may be linked wither to complex polysaccharides or to proteins. The uronic acids are reducing sugar acids formed by the oxidation of the terminal carbinol group (C atom 6) of the sugar, a process which apparently occurs readily in both plants and animals. Although a large number of uronic acids are theoretically possible, only three have been found to occur naturally, these being d-galacturonic, d-glucuronic and d-mannuronic acids.

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  • αβγ-trimethyl-glutaconic acid

    Jacobson, Paul R (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Over a number of years many attempts have been made to synthesize αβγ-trimethyl-glutaconic acids. [Formula here]. No method has given very satisfactory results. In many cases the yields have been very poor and in no case has the constitution of the product been demonstrated conclusively.

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  • The formation, control, and utilisation of the coastal sand dunes between the Waimakariri River and the Sumner Estuary.

    Biggs, Leslie Ronald (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The press and society in New Zealand

    Weir, Jim (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    “I know not what use there may be in the study of history, if it be not to guide and instruct us in the present.” Disraeli. In the year 1946 the British National Union of journalists made a request for an inquiry into the operations of the Press in the United Kingdom. That inquiry is now under way. A similar request was made in the New Zealand Parliament, but so far no inquiry has been instituted. Why was it necessary to make such a request? Or does a country develop the Press, like the Government, it deserves? Rudyard Kipling declared that the function of the Press was to act as a “king over all the children of pride”. More recently Wickham Steed has elaborated the definition. The function of the Press, he declares, is “to chasten the haughty and succour the week, to scorn the bigot and confound the sceptic, to serve truth without fear, to admonish the people and expose the demagogue, to chide the wayward and embolden the faint-hearted – in a word to provide sound comment upon public life in all its aspects”. This, says Steed, should be “the task of the Press and the source of its power”. Has the New Zealand Press lived up to these expectations? Or has it cult itself off from the source of its privileges and its power and become “a branch of trade” rather than an organ of public opinion? Wickham Steed declares that the commercialisation of the Press has proceeded to such a degree that it has become “the central problem of modern democracy”. It has the aim of the present thesis to examine this contention in relation to the development of the Press in New Zealand.

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  • The geology of the northern part of the Taringatura survey district

    Coombs, Douglas Saxon (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 200 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geology. Typescript.

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  • A proximate analysis of a Maori food; the Karaka berry

    McCurdy, Betty Joan (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 114 leaves :col. ill, maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago faculty: Home Science

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  • The Southland secession movement

    Ryan, Archie Bruce (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: 204 p. : maps, tables. Notes: Typescript. "Thesis presented for the Degree of M.A. (Honours in History) 1947" [Univ. of New Zealand] Bibliography: p.202-204.

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