81 results for 1940, Masters

  • A study of some aspects of written composition in the primary school.

    Ford, Clarence Thomas (1949)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The exploration and settlement of the Upper Rangitata district.

    Anderson, Coral Teifi (1943)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • From primary school direct to work : a survey of the pupils who left the primary schools of Christchurch to enter employment for the twelve month period ending 31st December, 1938.

    Dawber, Bruce Kirk (1940)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The formation, control, and utilisation of the coastal sand dunes between the Waimakariri River and the Sumner Estuary.

    Biggs, Leslie Ronald (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The Church of England and education in Canterbury, 1849-1918.

    Betteridge, Maurice Stanley (1948)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Health education, with special reference to Christchurch schools.

    Manson, Duncan (1943)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The press and society in New Zealand

    Weir, Jim (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    “I know not what use there may be in the study of history, if it be not to guide and instruct us in the present.” Disraeli. In the year 1946 the British National Union of journalists made a request for an inquiry into the operations of the Press in the United Kingdom. That inquiry is now under way. A similar request was made in the New Zealand Parliament, but so far no inquiry has been instituted. Why was it necessary to make such a request? Or does a country develop the Press, like the Government, it deserves? Rudyard Kipling declared that the function of the Press was to act as a “king over all the children of pride”. More recently Wickham Steed has elaborated the definition. The function of the Press, he declares, is “to chasten the haughty and succour the week, to scorn the bigot and confound the sceptic, to serve truth without fear, to admonish the people and expose the demagogue, to chide the wayward and embolden the faint-hearted – in a word to provide sound comment upon public life in all its aspects”. This, says Steed, should be “the task of the Press and the source of its power”. Has the New Zealand Press lived up to these expectations? Or has it cult itself off from the source of its privileges and its power and become “a branch of trade” rather than an organ of public opinion? Wickham Steed declares that the commercialisation of the Press has proceeded to such a degree that it has become “the central problem of modern democracy”. It has the aim of the present thesis to examine this contention in relation to the development of the Press in New Zealand.

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  • A history of the New Zealand Baptist missionary society, 1885-1947

    Simpson, E. P. Y. (1948)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The New Zealand Baptist Missionary Society is today a comparatively complex organisation, with its superior administration in New Zealand and doing specific work in two districts of East Bengal (Dominion of Pakistan) and in Tripura State (Dominion of India. The purpose of this present study is to discuss the origins and development of this work. The roots of the Society are deeply embedded in history, for the story is essentially tiny segment of the total history of the expansion of Christianity. Consequently, it is essential to indicate the relation of the Society to that wider movement. The attempting of this present task was inspired by the study of Professor K. S. Latourette’s “History of the Expansion of Christianity”. It was observed that Dr. Latourette’s only knowledge of the work of New Zealand Baptism was derived from a single article in “The Chronicle”. That article, though good in itself, was far from being an adequate source of information, being frankly an uncritical and popular sketch which omitted a full valuation of the work done. The N.Z.B.M.S. has published three quasi-historical sketches; the best of which is certainly H. H. Driver’s “These Forty Years”. But there has been no endeavour up to the present to write a formal history of the Society. The Primary and secondary sources of information are fully listed in the bibliography. While manuscripts have been few in number it has been the habit of the Society to publish a great wealth of material in the official periodicals. In fact, so much has been published that it would almost be possible to write brief bibliographies of the individual missionaries without seeking other source material! The most difficult problem of condensation occurred in relation to Chapters 5 and 6. In the former of these chapters it has been necessary to omit many details which the source material supplies, and in particular to ignore extremely valuable and faithful work done by individual missionaries. In full justice to the persons concerned it is to be hoped that someone will undertake that more detailed story. There was also a difficult problem in regard to chapter 4, and the crisis which developed in the work and administration of the Society. While the story of the origin was common knowledge at the time, the generation which knew the truth has nearly disappeared. The quasi-historical publications of the Society discretely (or indiscreetly) side-stepped the subject. However, a careful study of all the published records, and inquiry from some whose memory of events is good including contact with three who were intimately concerned, create the conviction that the explanation offered in chapter 4 is the correct explanation. It should be stated that the Mission has again reached a transitional period in its history. In November, 1948, it is planned to send a Commission to the Indian Field to report upon the whole work, and to recommend to the appropriate authorities the type of readjustments which may seem desirable. This Commission is to be comprised of the Rev. P. F. Lanyon, General Secretary of the Baptist Union of New Zealand and of the N.Z.B.M.S., and Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Nees. The question of the spelling of Bengali names is a perplexing problem. At different stages and by different people the spellings have varied greatly. As a general rule, the spelling adopted in regard to the New Zealand Field is that now in current use, but that adopted in regard to the neighbouring Australian Fields has been that which was the accepted usage at the time.

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  • Some aspects of child welfare in New Zealand : with special reference to factory legislation and industrial conditions, 1840-1890

    McMillan, Mary Christine (1945)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The children of New Zealand are probably the most fortunate in the world, for from ante-natal clinic to Vocational Guidance Centre the state watches over their welfare. This thesis is an attempt to find in the past the germs of this humanitarian spirit. Its scope was originally intended to extend to 1945, to trace the genesis of the work of the recent apprenticeship commission in the attention paid to children in the two fields of industry and education. It was soon evident, however, that this was too ambitious a project, and instead a short period has been covered – a period all important in determining the course which the colony was to follow. As the scope in time has been reduced, that of the subject matter has been extended. I have found it impossible to deal with the attitude towards children in industry without giving an account of the development of that industry, while the attitude towards education is only part of the spirit which has been shown also in other fields.

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  • Monetary policy in New Zealand

    White, George David Lloyd (1940)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The aim of this thesis is to give with substantial securacy a record of monetary development in New Zealand during the first four years of the Labour Government’s period of office and to make some critical comments on the policy then pursued. As such, the thesis may be condemned on the grounds of over-simplification and superficiality, through trying to cover too wide a field with too much brevity. But, although the factual data is accessible to anyone who cares to delve into the official New Zealand statistics, and, although written expressions of opinion on New Zealand’s recent monetary problems have been legion, the effort of carefully selecting these facts and opinions and bringing them together into a coherent and impartial treatise may still be worthwhile. No such original contribution is here attempted, but a clear statement of existing ideas, especially as regards the limitations of monetary policy, and the interpretation of official statistics in the light of these ideas, is of some topical importance in New Zealand. A short chapter on war-time monetary problems has been included; and, incidentally, this has clarified rather than confused the main theme – namely that non finality can be reached in monetary policy but that the latter must always be a tool for producing something further, for example, organisation for war. Not that this remark is very profound, but it represents an attitude which it has been considered worth emphasising with some vigour.

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  • The life of Sir John L.C. Richardson

    McCaig, Joseph Bruce (1949)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Soldier, farmer, politician and crusader, Sir John Richardson may be said to have lived a full and varied life. His ability and integrity fitted him well to cope with the heavy responsibilities which were thrust upon him in his role of a leader of a pioneering community. The shaping of the future of Otago and New Zealand, and the welfare of their people, owed not a little to his practical knowledge, his good sense, and his devotion to the course which he believed Providence had marked out for him. Aloof and autocratic as he may have seemed to some of his contemporaries, his humane character and scrupulous honesty outweighed any faults he possessed, and he endeared “the Major”, as he was affectionately called, to every section of the community. It is the primary endeavour of this work to illustrate the way in which Richardson influenced his times and fulfilled his self-allotted task of serving his fellow men. [extract from Preface]

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  • Colonel the honourable Sir James Allen : statesman.

    Voller, Lois Claire (1943)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Digital copy stored under Section 55 of the NZ Copyright Act.

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  • Agricultural education in post-primary schools: being an investigation into agricultural courses in the post-primary schools of Canterbury, Otago and Southland

    Watson, John E (1949)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

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  • Early Otago newspapers

    Clapperton, Barbara (1949)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    INTRODUCTION. It has been said with much truth that the newspaper of today is one of the world’s most influential text books. It is thus easy to appreciate the still greater importance of the newspaper of seventy-five or more years ago. Our present world with its great advances in science, with the invention and development of the radio, the facsimile newspaper, television, radio-type and newsreels offers many challenges to the ordinary newspaper. Seventy-five years ago such opponents were not known, and the newspaper took first place as the only medium by which local news and overseas news were transmitted to the public. The relation of the daily paper to the community was very aptly summed up by Julius Vogel who wrote in the first leading article in the Otago Daily Times, 15 November, 1861, and reprinted in the Diamond Jubilee Issue, 1921 ---“The benefits arising from a daily newspaper are not to be exaggerated. Independent of the opportunity it affords to the community of making its wants felt and its wishes known to the outside world, and so asserting its dignity and advancing its importance, the moral, social, and commercial influences of a daily journal are strongly marked. It brings the members of a community into a closer unity; knits bonds of fellowship between them, not easily severed; facilitates business, advances the value of property, and in short mixes itself up so intimately with the daily events of life that, once having experienced its benefits, its absence is nothing short of a public calamity”. That the value of a newspaper in any community was recognised is borne out by the number established throughout Otago during its earliest years, not least important of which was the Otago News published in the same year as the arrival of “John Wickliffe” and the Philip Laing”. In outlying districts as population grew and as industry flourished, there came also the press, helped greatly by the impetus of goldseeking. It is with the development of these early newspapers, with their ambitions and struggles - and in many cases their failures - that I am here concerned, for they are the record of courage and endeavour inherent in the making up of those early colonists.

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  • The geology of the northern part of the Taringatura survey district

    Coombs, Douglas Saxon (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 200 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geology. Typescript.

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  • Investigations on karakin and Hiptagenic acid

    McChesney, John William (1946)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 150 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves [145]-150.

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  • A proximate analysis of a Maori food; the Karaka berry

    McCurdy, Betty Joan (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 114 leaves :col. ill, maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago faculty: Home Science

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  • The Southland secession movement

    Ryan, Archie Bruce (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: 204 p. : maps, tables. Notes: Typescript. "Thesis presented for the Degree of M.A. (Honours in History) 1947" [Univ. of New Zealand] Bibliography: p.202-204.

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  • The South Island Māori population.

    Rutherford, D. W. (Donald William) (1941)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    "D. W. Rutherford"--handwritten on t.p. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • A history of New Zealand anthropology during the nineteenth century

    Booth, John March (1949)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    ix, 236 leaves :ill., map ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript.

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