3 results for 1950, VUW ResearchArchive, Masters

  • Representative Institutions in Western Samoa During the Mandate 1919 - 1946

    Martin, J. R. (1959)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This study began as a description of the government of Western Samoa as a whole during the Mandate period 1919-1946. It soon became apparent that within the limits imposed by the time and space available it would not be possible to give an adequate treatment of such a wide subject, The scope was then reduced to a study of representative institutions during the period; the thesis is thus concerned with a well defined aspect of colonial administration rather than to provide a well rounded study in comparative political institutions. (To put the study in its correct perspective it was necessary also to include a brief chapter on District and Village Government and quite lengthy descriptive and historical chapters.) An additional reason for reducing the scope of the work was the wealth of untouched primary material available in the records of the Department of Island Territories, which were made freely available by the Secretary (Mr. J.M. McEwen). The scarcity of documentation available on the controversial history of New Zealand's Mandate a matter of considerable concern in view of the Territory's imminent independence made it seem worthwhile to collate as fully as possible material from this primary source. Although this may perhaps have been achieved at the cost of developing an original narrative, the exercise of compilation will have been of some value if it provides a starting point for more analytical studies.

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  • The Struggle for Imperial Preferential Trade, 1887-1917, with Particular Reference to New Zealand

    Galloway, Ian Thomas (1952)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The years 1887-1917 were years of continuous efforts to reconcile seeming irreconcilables in the economic sphere of relations between Great Britain and those of her self-governing colonies who were rapidly attaining to nationhood: Canada, the Australian and South African colonies, and New Zealand. Simply stated the problem on the one side was how the Mother Country could satisfy the demands of these colonies for some preference to their exports, when to do so would involve her in a fiscal revolution. She stood firmly, with almost religious fervour by the tenets of free trade, and to advocate any radical change would be a policy of political suicide for any party which adopted it as its platform. At the time she was the leader of the world's commerce, a fact that she attributed to the very free trade policy which the colonies would overthrow. From the colonial point of view, the problem was to meet what appeared to them, a growing threat to their own exports by those foreign powers, mainly Germany and America, who through a policy of protection were keeping British products out of their own markets, and who through subsidies and differential rates were able to undersell the colonies on the Home market. These same foreign powers, in spite of colonial protective tariffs, were able to compete with the small local industries, and in many cases could undersell the the produce of the Mother Country in the colonies. The answer which the colonies seized eagerly upon and fought so long and strenuously for, was an imperial preferential trade. Immediately, however, they were faced with the fact that the portion of the Empire most concerned, namely Britain, refused to change her fiscal system for a policy which she considered unnecessary and inimical to her own interests.

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  • Contributions to the Geology of Mt. Ruapehu, New Zealand

    O'Shea, Bernard Emmett (1957)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    During the passage of the lahar, shortly after 10 o'clock on Christmas Eve 1953, a portion of the Whangaehu River rail bridge at Tangiwai was demolished by a raging torrent of mud and boulders which originated from the Crater Lake of Mt. Ruapehu, nearly twenty miles distant. This mudflow, or lahar, damaged the railway bridge piers and the Wellington-Auckland express plunged into the torrent. As a result, one hundred and fifty-one people lost their lives. During tramping and ski-ing trips over the past five years the writer has become well acquainted with the National Park area. Close inspection of the Crater Lake was made on 1 January 1954, and again on 22 January. On the latter date the writer was accompanied by two chemists from the Chemistry Department, Victoria University College, and one from the Dominion Laboratory of the Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, who collected samples of the lake water. On 24 January, the Whangaehu River was followed from the Desert Road to where it emerges from a deep gorge on the lower slopes of Mt. Ruapehu. A number of braided channels were examined on the alluvial fan that extends east from the outlet gorge almost to the Desert Road. On the same day the scene of the disaster at Tangiwai was also inspected

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